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Catalogue of the collection of birds' eggs in the British museum (Natural history) (Volume 1) online

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i *-



UC-NRLF




B M lift




BIOLOGY
LIBRARY



CATALOGUE



OF THE



COLLECTION



OF



B I R D S' EGGS



IN THE



BRITISH MUSEUM.



VOLUME I.



LONDON:
PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE TRUSTEES.

1901.
(All rights reserved.)



CATALOGUE



OF THE



COLLECTION



OF



B I EDS' EGGS



THE



BRITISH MUSEUM

(NATURAL HISTORY). :



VOLUME I.
RATITjE. CARINAT^ (TINAMIFORMES LARIFORMES).

BY

EUGENE W. GATES.



LONDON:
PRINTED BY ORDER OF THE TRUSTEES.

SOLD BY

LONGMANS & Co., 39 PATERNOSTER ROW, E.C. ;

B. QUARITCH, 15 PICCADILLY, W. ; DULAU & Co., 37 SOHO SQUARE, W. ;
KEGAN PAUL, TRENCH, TRUBNER & Co., CHARING CROSS ROAD, W.C. ;

AND AT THE

BRITISH MUSEUM (NATURAL HISTORY), CROMWELL ROAD, 8.W.

1901.






PRINTED BY TAYLOR AND FRANCIS,
RED LION COURT, FLEET STREET.



PREFACE.



THE present volume has been written by Mr. Eugene W. Gates,
who is well known to Ornithologists as the Editor of the second
edition of Mr. Allan Hume's ' Nests and Eggs of Indian Birds/ and
as the author of the earlier volumes of the ' Aves' in the ' Fauna of
British India.' That he has performed his task conscientiously will
be easily perceptible from a perusal of the following pages.

The Collection of Birds' Eggs in the British Museum now
exceeds a total of 50,000 specimens. It was arranged and labelled
some few years ago by Miss Emily Mary Sharpe, under the direction
of the late Mr. Henry Seebohm and her father, Dr. Bowdler Sharpe.
On that occasion Mr. Seebohm presented to the Trustees the whole
of his collection of eggs of Palaearctic Birds, and an opportunity was
thus offered of re-arranging the entire series in the Museum. At
the same time the valuable donations of Mr. A. 0. Hume, Messrs.
Salvin and Godman, Mr. Berkeley James, and other friends of the
Museum, were incorporated.

The original collection of Birds' eggs in the British Museum was
rendered of little worth by the exposure of many precious spe-
cimens to the light of the public galleries, and by the mounting of
the study collection on wooden tablets. Most of these specimens
have perished, or have become so bleached as to be worthless for
purposes of study.

A series of the eggs of British birds, illustrating even those
of species included as ' rare ' or ' accidental visitors ' to the British

418487



VI PREFACE.

Islands, has been carefully arranged for exhibition in the Pavilion
of the Bird-Gallery, and has proved of great assistance to students
of the eggs of our native species of birds.

It is to be regretted that the whole of the first volume of this
Catalogue was printed before the valuable bequest of eggs by the
late Mr. Philip Crowley could be incorporated ; but in the future
volumes of the Catalogue the collection bequeathed by Mr. Crowley
to the nation, one of the most valuable of the donations of recent
years, will be duly chronicled.

I have to acknowledge much assistance in editing the present
volume from Dr. Bowdler Sharpe, the Assistant Keeper in charge of
the Sub-Department of Vertebrata.



E. RAY LANKESTEK,

Director.
British Museum (Natural History),

February 25, 1901.



INTRODUCTION.



THE only Catalogue of the Birds' Eggs in the Collection of the
British Museum which has hitherto been published was prepared by
the late Mr. G. R. Gray, and issued by the Trustees in 1852. It
treats only of the eggs of British birds, but does not furnish a
history of the specimens.

The present Catalogue deals with all the eggs contained in the
Collection of the Museum with the exception of those in the Exhi-
bition Galleries, which have often to be replaced. A convenient
opportunity is thus afforded for reviewing the history of the entire
collection from its earliest commencement. Many ancient eggs
dating from the time of Montagu and Bullock are still preserved
in the Museum, but they are bleached and faded almost beyond
recognition, having been exposed to the light for many years in the
Museum galleries.

An early donation seems to have been made in 1842 by Mr. D. W.
Mitchell. It consisted of some eggs of British birds, chiefly from
Cornwall. In 1844 Sir T. Wilson presented the Trustees with
some specimens from Norway. In 1847 a small donation of sea-
birds' eggs from the Mauritius was made by Admiral Sir E. Belcher;
and in the next year Dr. Rae contributed some specimens taken by
him in Repulse Bay, Arctic America.

In 1850, Captain Stanley, the Commander of H.M.S. ' Rattle-
snake,' presented to the Museum the eggs collected, during the
voyage of that ship, by Dr. J. Macgillivray, the naturalist to the
Expedition. All the specimens are of great interest and are well
authenticated. In the same year the Trustees purchased a collection
of eggs made in South Greenland by Governor Holboll.

In 1851, two collections passed into the Museum. One was
acquired from Mr. A. D. Bartlett, and the other was presented by
Sir George Grey, then Governor of New Zealand.

In 1852, the Trustees received a small collection made by
Dr. Lyall during the voyage of H.M.S. ' Acheron ' in New Zealand



Vlll INTRODUCTION.

waters; and also a considerable general collection, presented by
Mr. H. F. Walter.

Two donations were made in 1853 : one by Mr. E. L. Layard of
the eggs of Ceylonese birds, and one by Sir Kenneth Loftus of eggs
collected in Persia and Mesopotamia.

No more acquisitions appear to have been made for three years ;
but in 1856 a small collection from India was presented by Professor
Oldham, and another from Australia by Sir D. Cooper.

In 1858, the Trustees were presented with a rather large collec-
tion of British birds' eggs by Mr. F. Bond ; and in 1859 with one
formed by Dr. Lyall during the voyage of H.M.S. ' Plumper ' in the
Northern Pacific Ocean. In the same year a collection made by
Mr. T. Ayres in Natal was acquired.

A considerable interval again elapsed without any accessions to
the Collection ; but in 1863 Mr. J. K. Lord presented the specimens
he had taken in the Rocky Mountains and British Columbia, while
attached to the North American Boundary Commission, and in the
same year a valuable collection was received from Mr. Bernard R.
Boss, from the Saskatchewan and Mackenzie River Districts of
Canada.

With the exception of a donation in 1869 from Mr. E. L. Layard
of specimens collected in South Africa, no additions were made
to the Collection till 1875, when Mr. S. 0. Sahlin presented a series
of Swedish eggs.

In 1876, a particularly fine collection of eggs, procured "by the
Rev. A. E. Eaton in Kerguelen Island during the ' Transit of Venus '
Expedition, was presented to the Trustees by the Royal Society.

The accessions in 1878 consisted of a small number of specimens
from Samoa and other islands of the Pacific Ocean, procured by the
Rev. S. J. Whitmee ; and the small collection made by Sir George
Nares's Expedition to the Polar Sea in the ' Alert ' and ' Discovery,'
of which ships Col. H. W. Feilden and Mr. C. Hart were respec-
tively the naturalists.

In 1879, Admiral A. H. Markham contributed a few specimens
taken in Novaya Zemlya during his voyage in the ' Isbjorn.'

In 1880, the valuable collection formed during the Voyage of
H.M.S. ' Challenger ' was received by the Trustees ; also a collec-
tion made by Sir Hugh Low in Borneo, as well as the eggs obtained
by Dr. R. W. Coppinger during the cruise of H.M.S. ' Alert.'

In 1881, the acquisition of the late John Gould's collection of
eggs of Australian and European birds was a notable event.



INTRODUCTION.



IX



In 1884, the Museum received two small collections, one made
by Mr. John Whitehead in Corsica, and the other by Mr. E. W.
Gates in Burma.

In 1885, a particularly valuable series of eggs of Madagascan
birds was acquired from the Rev. W. Deans Cowan. They are
the only specimens from this island in the Museum, and their
value cannot be over-estimated.

It was in 1885, and almost simultaneously, that the magnificent
collections formed by Mr. Allan 0. Hume, C.B., and Messrs.
Osbert Salvin and F. DuCane Godman were presented to the
Trustees. These collections were of such magnitude that some
time necessarily elapsed before they were finally incorporated with
the general collection and made available for study.

The Hume Collection consists almost entirely of the eggs of
Indian birds. Mr. Hume seldom or never purchased a specimen,
and the large collection brought together by him in the course of
many years was the result of the willing co-operation of numerous
friends resident in India and Burma. Every specimen in the
collection may be said to have been properly authenticated by a
competent naturalist; and the history of most of the clutches
has been carefully recorded in Mr. Hume's ' Nests and Eggs of
Indian Birds,' of which two editions have been published.

The Salvin-Godmari Collection is of a more general character.
As might be expected, it is rich in eggs of American birds. Not
only did the above-named naturalists themselves collect in Central
America, but they also purchased several important collections,
chief among which should be mentioned that of Mr. T. K. Salmon,
who formed a remarkably fine collection in the United States of
Colombia. The Henshaw Collection of eggs of North-American birds
was afterwards acquired by Dr. Godman ; and the Smithsonian
Institution appears to have been ever ready to present specimens to
these two well-known naturalists. The large collection made by
Salvin in Algeria, upwards of forty years ago, is most valuable, not
only on account of the rarity of many of the specimens but for the
absolute authenticity of their identification. The eggs of European
birds are well represented ; and a small number of Indian specimens
were received from Mr. E. L. Layard (Ceylon) and Capt. R. C. Beavan
(Bengal).

In 1887, a small but valuable collection of eggs from Norfolk
Island was presented by Dr. W. M. Crowfoot.

In 1888, two small donations were received : one from Lieut.-Col.



X INTRODUCTION.

Willoughby Verner of eggs obtained by him in the Soudan ; the
other from the Royal Society, consisting of the specimens taken
on the island of Fernando Noronha by Mr. H. N. Ridley.

In 1890 the bequest of Dr. R. McCormick, consisting chiefly of
sea-birds' eggs obtained during his voyages in the * Erebus ' and
' Terror/ was received by the Trustees. Also a collection made by
Mr. W. D. Gumming in the Persian Gulf, and a few specimens
brought by Mr. St. George Littledale from Central Asia.

Considerable additions were made in 1891. Foremost among
these was the donation by Mr. Howard Saunders of his well-known
series of eggs of Gulls and Terns. Professor George Dawson's
collection, formed while he was engaged on the North American
Boundary Commission, was of considerable interest. The follow-
ing small contributions were also made : A collection made by
Mr. J. J. Lister in the islands of the Pacific Ocean ; one made by
Captain Collinson, Commander of H.M.S. ' Enterprise,' in Arctic
America ; and, lastly, some eggs taken in North-west Australia
by Mr. J. J. Walker, during the voyage of H.M.S. Penguin/
presented by the Admiralty.

In 1893, Mr. F. A. Philbrick, Q.C., presented a collection of
eggs of Australian birds formed by his son, mostly in Gippsland,
Victoria ; and Sir W. M. Conway gave some specimens from the
Himalayas.

It was in 1893 that the late Henry Seebohm presented his fine
collection of eggs to the Trustees. This valuable gift was brought
to the Museum in instalments, and Seebohm was engaged for two
years, with the assistance of Miss Emily Sharpe, in arranging and
incorporating his specimens with the general collection of the
Museum. In fact, he undertook to rearrange the whole series of
eggs in accordance with the * Catalogue of Birds,' which was then
approaching completion, and to incorporate the Hume, the Salvin-
Godman, and some minor collections together. This task was
fortunately completed before his death, and he left the bulk of the
collection arranged in most methodical order, with the name of
each species and the history of each clutch of eggs carefully recorded,
not only in the cabinets but also in a Catalogue which occupies
ten volumes of manuscript. The eggs of the Passeriform.es were
arranged by Miss Emily Sharpe, under her father's direction.
Seebohm's labours, as may be imagined, have greatly facilitated the
writing of the present Catalogue.



INTRODUCTION. XI

Seebohm's Collection was composed almost entirely of the eggs
of Palaearctic species of birds. Not only was he a most energetic
traveller and successful collector himself in many countries of
Europe and in Siberia, but he was in constant communication with
many well-known naturalists on the Continent. He also acquired
some reliable collections, the most noticeable of which was the
excellent collection of British birds' eggs got together by that
sterling naturalist, the late Edward Hargitt, R.I.

In 1894, the Museum received a small collection made by
Mr. 0. V. Aplin in Uruguay, and another, presented by Mr. S.
Butcher, of specimens taken on the Arabian Coast.

In 1895, Colonel J. W. Yerbury presented some birds' eggs
obtained by him near Aden, and Mr. Alexander Fry a series from
Rio de Janeiro.

The accessions in 1896 and 1897 consisted of a few eggs taken by
Mr. A. W. Anthony on the Revillagegido islands and the islands of
the Gulf of California, and presented by him. With the purchase
of the Steere collection of Philippine birds, the Trustees also acquired
an interesting series of eggs.

No less than five collections were received in 1898. First -in
importance was the fine series of eggs of Chilian birds bequeathed
to the Trustees by Mr. H. Berkeley James. Almost equally
important was the one formed by Mr. A. H. Holland in the
Argentine Republic, and purchased by the Museum. The other
collections, though small, were of great interest. Sir John Murray
presented the eggs taken by Dr. C. W. Andrews on Christmas
Island, in the Indian Ocean ; from Mr. John Whitehead were pur-
chased the specimens obtained by him in the Philippine Islands ;
and Captain G. E. H. Barrett-Hamilton presented the birds' eggs
collected by him in the islands of Bering's Straits, in the Northern
Pacific.

In 1399 the acquisitions were small but of great interest. A set
of eggs collected by the Webster-Harris Expedition to the Galapagos
Islands was added to the Collection, as well as a small number of
authenticated specimens from Costa Rica, collected by Mr. C. F.
Underwood, while Dr. Cuthbert Christy presented some interesting
eggs collected by him on the Niger.

In 1900 a large contribution of the eggs of North- American
birds, collected by Mr. W. E. D. Scott, was received in exchange
from the Princeton University, New Jersey ; a small collection
of Australian eggs was presented by Mr. Donald Mackintosh ;



Xli INTRODUCTION.

several eggs were received from Mr. C. A. Barnard, a well-known
collector in New Guinea and Northern Australia; Mr. E. S.
Moulden of Adelaide also presented some interesting specimens ;
and a few eggs, taken by Mr. A. B. Percival in British Central
Africa, were also purchased.

Since the commencement of 1901 a very fine collection of the
eggs of Chinese birds has been presented by Mr. C. B. Ilickett.
Sir George Newnes has also given to the Museum a first set of the
specimens brought back by the ' Southern Cross ' Expedition to
the Antarctic Ocean. This selection comprises the eggs of three
species of sea-birds not previously represented in the Museum.

In addition to the above, it will be seen from the following pages
that presents of specimens have been received from many naturalists.
Among these may be mentioned the Hon. C. Baring, the late
A. H. Everett, Colonel H. W. Feilden, Mr. W. E. Ogilvie Grant,
Dr. A. Giinther, Mr. Charles Hose, Colonel L. H. Irby, Mr. F. G.
Jackson, Mr. F. J. Jackson, C.B., Sir H. H. Johnston, K.C.B.,
th*e late Lord Lilford, the late Sir Henry Peek, Captain G. Savile
Keid, Dr. P. L. Sclater, Dr. R. Bowdler Sharpe, and Mr. E. J.
Ussher. Many valuable eggs, laid in confinement, have been
presented from time to time by the Zoological Society of
London.

In this Catalogue, the arrangement and nomenclature of Dr.
Bowdler Sharpe's ' Hand-list of the Genera and Species of Birds '
have been adopted. This ' Hand-list ' and the ' Catalogue of the
Birds in the British Museum' have been invariably quoted through-
out the present work. The other references have been selected with
the view to present as complete a history of the eggs and nesting-
habits as possible. Good figures of the eggs are quoted, and
especial reference has been made to those authors whose reports, or
papers in periodical literature, treat of the particular specimens
in the Collection with which their names are associated.

The birds included in this volume embrace the Ratitcv and that
portion of the Carinatce extending in the ' Hand-list ' from the
Tinamiformes to the Lariformes. The total number of species
is 520 and of specimens 12,156, distributed in the following
manner :



INTRODUCTION. Xlll

RATITJE.

No. of species. No. of specimens.

Rheiformes 2 16

Struthioniformes 4 15

Casuariiformes 7 32

Dinornithiformes 1 4

jEpyornithiformes 1 4

Apterygiformes 1 2



Tinamiformes 17 109

GaUiformes 137 2310

Hemipodii 14 262

Pteroclidiformes 9 243

Columbiformes 87 752

Opisthocomiformes 1 7

Ralliformes 54 1026

Podicipedidiformes 15 313

Colymbiformes 4 124

Sphenisciformes 10 125

Procellariiformes 48 445

Alciformes 16 926

Lariformes 92 5441

520 12,156

It appears, therefore, that the British Museum Collection contains
specimens of the eggs of about one-third of the total number of the
living or recently-extinct birds belonging to the above mentioned
Orders, as enumerated in the ' Hand-list.'

With few exceptions, the eggs now illustrated have not been
figured before. It only remains to add that the measurements of
the specimens throughout this Catalogue are invariably in English
inches.

The symbols employed in the present volume are the same as
those in the * Catalogue of Birds.' [P.] means * Presented by,"
[C.] " Collected by," [E.] " Received in exchange."

EUGENE W. OATES.

February 20, 1901.



SYSTEMATIC IN HEX.



Sub-Class RATIT-ffi.
Order RHEIFORMES.






Family

Page

Rhea, Lath ............... 1

americana (Linn.) ...... 1

darwiui, Gould ........ 2

Order STRUTHIONIFORMES.
Family STRUTHIONID^.

Struthio, Linn ............. 2

camelus, Linn ......... 3

molybdophanes, Reichen.. 3

australis, Gurney ...... 3

masaicus, O. Neumann . . 4

Order CASUARIIFORMES.
Family DBOM^ID^.

Dromseus, Vieill ........... 4

novae-hollandiae (Lath.}. . 4

Family CASUARIIDJE.

Casuarius, Briss ........... 5

casuarius (Linn.} ...... 5

australis, Wall ........ 5

beccarii, Scl ........... 6

uniappendiculatus, Blyth, 6

papuanus, Schley ....... 6

bennetti, Gould ....... 7

Order DINORNITHIFORMES.

Family DINORNITHID^E.

Dinornis, Owen .......... 7



Order ^IPYORNITHIFORMES,
Family ^EPYORNITHID^:.

Page

^Epyornis, Is. Geoffr 8

Order AFTER YGIFORMES.
Family AFTER YGID^E.

Apteryx, Shaw 9 1

mantelli, Bartl 9

Sub-Class CARINAT^.

Order TINAMIFORMES.
Family TINAMID^E.

Sub-Family Tinaminae.

Tinamus, Hermann 10

robustus, Scl. 10

solitarius ( Vieill) 229

major (Gm.) 10

ruficeps, Scl. $ Salv 11

Nothocercus, Bp 11

frantzii (Lawr.) 11

intercedens, Salvad. .... 11

Crypturus, llliy 11

obsoletus (Temm.) 229

griseiventris, Salvad 11

pileatus (Bodd.) 12

cinnamomeus (Less.) .... 12

Rhynchotus, Spi.r 12

rufescens (Temm.) 12

Nothoprocta, Scl. $ Salr. . . 13

perdicaria (Kittl.) 13

curvirostris, Scl. 8f Salv. . 13

Xothura, Wagler 13

maculosa ( Temm.) 18

darwini, Gray 14



XVI



SYSTEMATIC INDEX.



Page
Sub-Family Tinamotidinse.

Calopezus, Ridgu- ......... 14

elegans (1)' Orb. $ Geofr. ) 14

Tinamotis, Vigors ........ 14

pentlandi, Vigors ...... 14

Order GALLIFORMES.
Sub-Order MEGAPODII.
Family MEGAPODIIDJE.

Megapodius, Q. # G ....... 15

nicobariensis, Blyth . . 16

cumingi, Dilhv ......... 16

eremita, Hartl ......... 16

duperreyi, Less, fy Garn. . 16

layardi, Tristr ......... 17

pritchardi, Gray ...... 17

Lipoa, Gould ............ 18

ocellata, Gould ........ 18

Talegallus, Less ........... 18

cuvieri, Less ........... 18

Catheturus, Swains ......... 18

lathami (Lath.} ........ 18

Megalocephalum, Temm. . . 19

maleo, Hartl ........... 19

Sub-Order GRACES.



Family C

Crax, Linn ............... 19

alector, Linn ........... 19

globicera, Linn ......... 20

carunculata, Temm ..... 20

Mitua, Less ............... 20

mitu (Linn.) .......... 20

Pauxis, Temm ............. 20

pauxi (Linn.) .......... 20

Penelope, M err em ........ 21

pileata, Wagler ........ 21

Ortalis, Merrem .......... 21

ruficauda (Jard.) ...... 21

albiventris ( Wagler) .... 21

maccalli, Baird ......... 21

Aburria, Reicherib ......... 22

aburri (Less.} .......... 22

Chamaepetes, Wagler ...... 22

goudoti (Less.) ........ 22

Sub-Order PHASIANI.
Family TETRAONIDJE.

Lagopus, Briss ........... 22

scoticus (Lath.) ........ 23

lagopus (Linn.) ........ 23



Page

nmtus (Montin) 24

rupestris (Gm.) 25

Lyrurus, Swains 25

tetrix (Linn.) 25

mlokosiewiczi ( Tacz.) . . 26

Tetrao, Linn 26

urogallus, Linn 26

Canacliites, Stejn 27

canadensis (Linn.) 27

Dendragapus, Elliot 27

richardsoni (Doug I.) .... 27

Tympanuchus, Gloger 28

americanus (Reichenb.) . . 28

Centrocercus, Swains, 28

urophasianus (Bp.) .... 28

Pedicecetes, Baird 28

phasianellus (Linn.) .... 28

columbianus (Ord) .... 29

Bonasa, Steph 29

umbellus (Linn.) 29

Tetrastes, Keys. % Bias 30

bonasia (Linn.} , 30

Family PHASIANID^:.

Tetraogallus, J. E. Gray 31

tibetanus, Gould. 31

altaicus (Gebler) 31

himalayensis(J". E. Gray). 31

caspius (Gm.) 32

caucasicus (Pall.) 32

Caccabis, Kaup 32

saxatilis ( Wolf $ Meyer). 32

chukar ( J. E. Gray) 33

rufa (Linn.) 34

petrosa (Gm.) 34

Aminoperdix, Gould 35

bonhami (Fraser) 35

heyi (Temm.) 36

Francolinus, Stephens 36

francolinus (Linn.) .... 36

chinensis (Osbeck) 37

pictus (J.tyS.) 37

pondicerianus ( Gm.) 37

kirki, Hartl 38

africanus (Steph.) 38

gularis ( Temm.) 38

bicalcaratus (Linn.) .... 39

sharpei, Ogilvie Grant . . 39

capensis (Gm.) 39

Pternistes, Wagler 40

nudicollis (Bodd.) 40

infuacatus, Cab 229

Perdix, Briss 40

perdix (Linn.) 40

hodgsoniee (Hodgs.) .... 40



SYSTEMATIC INDEX.



XV11



Page

Perdicula, Hodys 41

asiatica (Lath.) 41

argoondak (Sykes) 41

Microperdix, Gould 41

erythrorhyncha (Sykes) . . 41

Arboricola, Hodgs 42

torqueola ( Vale-nc.) .... 42

atrigularis, Blyth 42

crudigularis (Swinh.*). ... 43

intermedia, Blyth 43

rufigularis, Blyth 43

Rollulus, Bonn. ' 43

roulroul (Scop.') 43

Melanoperdix, Jerdon 44

nigra ( Vigors) 44

Coturnix, Bonn 44

coturnix (Linn.} 44

africana (T. $ S.) 45

japonica, T. Sf S 45

coromandelica (Gm.) .... 45

pectoralis, Gould 46

novse-zealandisB ( Q. fy G.) 46

Syncecus, Gould 46

australis ( Temm.) 46

raalteni (Milll. $ Schleg.). 47

Excalfactoria, Bp 47

chinensis (Linn.) 47

lineata (Scop.) 48

Bambusicola, Gould 48

fytchei, Anders 48

thoracica (Temm.) .. 49,230

sonorivox, Gould 49

Galliperdix, Blyth 49

spadicea (Gm.) 49

lunulata ( Valenc.) 50

Ithagenes, Wayler 50

geoffroyi, Verr 50

Tragopan, Cuvier 50

satyra (Linn.) 50

melanocephalus(7..Z2.G ? ray). 51

temmincki (J. E. Gray). . 51

blythi (Jerd. ) 51

Lophophorus, Temm 52

impeyanus (Lath.) 52

Lophura, Fleming 52

rufa(JK^.) 52

nobilis (Sclater) 52

Lobiophasis, Sharps 53

bulweri, Sharpe 53

Crossoptilum, Hodys 53

tibetanum (Hodys.) .... 53

manchuricum, Sivinh. . . 53

Gennseus, Wayler 54

albicristatus ( Vty.) .... 54

melanonotus (Blyth) .... 54

horsfieldi (Gray) 55

VOL. I.



Pago

lineatus ( Vig.) 55

nycthemerus (Linn.) .... 5.~>

swinhoei (Gould) 56

Pucrasia, Gray 66

macrolopha (Less.) 56

Catreus, Cabanis 56

wallichi (Hardw.) 56

Phasianus, Linn 57

colchicus, Linn 57

torquatus, Gm 57

versicolor, Vieill 58

scintillans, Gould 58

Calophasis, Elliot 58

ellioti (Swinh.) 58

Chr} r solophus, J. JE. Gray . . 58

pictus (Linn.) 58

amherstiaB (Leadb.) .... 59

Gallus, Briss. ~ 59

gallus (Linn.) 59

lafayettei, Less 60

sonnerati, Temm 60

Argusianus, Rcifin , . . . 61

argus (Linn.) 61

grayi (Elliot) 61

Pavo, Linn ..... 61

cristatus, Linn , . . . 61

muticus, Linn 62

Family NUMIDID^E.

Numida, Linn 62

meleagris, Linn. . 63



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