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Catalogue of the ungulate mammals in the British Museum (Natural History) (Volume 4) online

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(?) Cervus inaral californica, Scvcrtzow, Turkestan. Javotnie, 1873,

p. 103, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. ser. 4, vol. xviii, p. 386, 1876.
Cervus nannodes, Mcrriam, Proc. Biol. Soc. Washington, vol. xviii,

p. 83, 1905; Elliot, Check-List Mamm. N. Amer. (Zool. Pub.

Field M^ux. vol. vi) p. 42, 1905 ; Miller, List N. Amer. Mamm.

p. 385, 1912.

Typical locality Button willow, Kern County, California.

Type in U.S. National Museum, Washington.

Size smaller and legs relatively shorter than in any of
the preceding races; general colour pale and rump-patch
small in comparison with that of other races. There are also
skull-differences.

The range appears to he mainly, if not entirely, restricted
to the San Joaquin Valley, but formerly included the higher
ridges of the White and Mogollon Mountains of Arizona and
New Mexico.

No specimen in collection.

E. Cervus canadensis xanthopygus.

Cervus elaphus, Pallas, Zoogr. Rosso-Asiat. p. 216, 1811 ; Schrenck,
JReis. und Forscli. im Amur-Lande, vol. i, p. 171, 1851 ; Kaddc,
Reise Siid-Ost-Siberien, pt. i, p. 284, 1862 ; nee Linn.

Cervus xanthopygus, Milne-Edwards, Ann. Sci. Nat. Zool. ser. 5,
vol. viii, p. 376, 1869, Recli. Mamm. p. 181, pi. xxi, 1870-74 ;
Fitzinger, Sitzber. k. Ak. Wiss. Wien, vol. Ixix, pt. 1, p. 590,
1874 ; Brooke, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1878, p. 68 ; Lijdekker, Deer of
All Lands, p. 81, pi. iii, 1898 ; Pousargues, Mem. Soc. Zool.
France, vol. xi, p. 205, 1898 ; Allen and Andrews, Bull. Amer.
Mus. Nat. Hist. vol. xxxii, p. 488, 1813.

Cervus luhdorfi, Bolau, Abh. Ver. Hamburg, vol. vii, p. 33, pi. iv,
1880 ; Fitzinger, Sitzber. k. Ak. Wiss. Wien, vol. Ixxxiii, p. 373,
1881 ; Pousargues, Mem. Soc. Zool. France, vol. xi, p. 209, 1898
(as a synonym of xanthopygus).

Cervus luehdorfi, Sclater, List. Anim. Zool. Gardens, p. 263, 1883.

Cervus isubra, Noack, Humboldt, vol. viii, p. 6, fig. 5, 1889.

Cervus bedfordianus, Lydekker, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1896, p. 932, pis.
xxxviii and xxxix, Deer of All Lands, p. 101, 1898 (as a synonym
of xanthopygus).

Cervus canadensis luehdorfi, Lydekker, Deer of All Lands, p. 102,
1898.



134 CATALOGUE OF UNGULATES

Cervus manchuricus typicus. Pousargues, Mem. Soc. Zool. France,

vol. xi, p. 209, 1898.
Cervus canadensis xanthopygus, Lydelcker, Great and Small Game

of Europe, etc. p. 70, 1901 ; Ward, Records of Big Game, ed. 6,

p. 48, 1910, ed. 7, p. 48, 1914.

ISUBRA.

Typical locality Northern Manchuria, probably the Usuri
district.

Type in Paris Museum.

Antlers of a shorter and stouter type than in the Tien-
shan race (infra), with the fourth tine relatively smaller
in immature individuals, and the portion above it less
developed at all ages ; the tips of the fourth and fifth tines
in the 5-tined antlers of subadult stags curving towards one
another like the " pincers " of a crab. General colour of
immature and subadult individuals in summer bright reddish
brown, in some cases without a distinct rump-patch, in older
animals (luehdorfi) browner ; in winter brownish grey, with
the dark neck-mane and under-parts of typical wapiti.

97. 12. 23. 1. Head, mounted, and body-skin. Man-
churia. Type of C. ledfordianus.

Presented ~by the Duke of Bedford, K.G., 1897.

99. 2. 20. 1. Skin, mounted. Manchuria.

Same donor, 1899.

99. 8. 30. 1-3. Three frontlets, with antlers. Sutschan
Valley, 280 miles east of Vladivostock, north of Manchuria.
These represent the so-called C. luehdorfi. Same history.

F. Cervus canadensis baicalensis nom. n.

Cervus maral var. sibirica, Severtzow, Turkestan. Jevotnie, 1873,
p. 109, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. ser. 4, vol. xviii, p. 386, 1876 ; *
nee Cervus sibiricus, Schreber, 1784.

Cervus canadensis asiaticus, LydeTcher, Deer of All Lands, p. 102,
pi. vi, 1898, partim, Great and Small Game of Europe, etc. p. 67,

* Severtzow's classification is as follows :

Cervus maral (= C. wapiti).
A. Var. Americana. B. Var. Asiatica.

a. canadensis. a. sibirica.

b. californica. b. songarica.
Hitherto the writer has used the name asiaticus for the present

race, but he is now of opinion that Severtzow did not intend
" Americana" and " Asiatica " to be used as technical names.






135

1901, Field, vol. cxi, p. 70, 1908 ; Elwes, Journ. Linn. Soc., Zool.

vol. xxiv, p. 39, 1899 ; Ward, Records of Big Game, ed. 6, p. 47,

1910 ; Meliely, Termt. Kozl. Budapest, vol. xlii, p. 806, 1910.
Cervus sibiricus, Matschie, Sitzber. Ges. nat. Freundc, 1907, p. 222.
Cervus canadensis sibiricus, Lydekker, Field, vol. cxi, p. 70, 1908, as

an alternative name; Ward, Records of Big Game, ed. 7. p. 47,

1914.

Typical locality Sayausk and Baikal Mountains, west of
Lake Baikal.

Compared with those of the next race, the antlers,
according to Matschie, are less stout and lighter in colour,
and have the fourth tine inclining outwards instead of
inwards, with only a slight bend at the tip, and the beam at
this point curving gradually inwards and backwards, with
the backward inclination less marked than in the Tien-Shan
race. On the front surface of the upper half of the beam
there is only one large tine (the fourth), the terminal portion
forming a long-handled but short-tined fork. This terminal
fork inclines inwards from the line of the summit of the
fourth tine, and also somewhat inwards from that of the
third tine, while between the third and fourth tines there is
no sharp inward angulation of the beam.*

The range apparently includes a portion of the Altai, as
well as part of the district to the southward of Lake Teletsk,
near the sources of the Yenisei (whence the stag figured in
The Deer of All Lands probably came). Whether the some-
what darker wapiti from the Krasnoyarsk district of the
Upper Yenisei is identical with this race, is still uncertain.

78. 11. 21. 24. Antlers. Salair, Altai; collected by

Dr. 0. Finsch. By exchange with the

Geographical Society of Bremen, 1878.

97. 5. 18. 2. Head-skin. Chuja Steppe, Altai,

Presented ly Major C. S. Cumberland, 1897.

* The above details (as in the case of several of the other races)
are given solely on the authority of Matschie. A mounted specimen
of the present race in the Tring Museum appeared to the writer very
similar to the undermentioned example of the next race. As a rule,
however, the mammals of the Altai are distinct from those of the
Tien- Shan.



136 CATALOGUE OF UNGULATES'

G. Cervus eanadensis song-aricus.

Cervus maral var. songarica, Severtzoiu, Turkestan. Jevotnie, p. 109,
1873, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. ser. 4, vol. xviii, p. 386, 1876.

Cervus eustephamis, Blanford, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1875, p. 637, Sclent.
Results Second Yarkand Mission, Mamm. p. 90, 1875 ; Brooke,
Proc. Zool. Soc. 1878, p. 912 ; W. L. Sclater, Cat. Mamm. Ind.
Mus. pt. ii, p. 184, 1891 ; Pousargues, Bull. Mus. Paris, 1895,
p. 266 ; Ward, Records of Big Game, ed. 2, p. 42, 1896 ; Gillett,
Proc. Zool. Soc. 1904, vol. ii, p. 179; Bentham, Cat. Asiat.
Horns and Antlers Ind. Mus. p. 66, 1908.

Cervus eanadensis eustephanus, Blanford, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1893,
p. 447.

Cervus eanadensis asiaticus. Lydekker, Deer of All Lands, p. 108,
1898, partim.

Cervus xanthopygus eustephanus, Pousargues, Mem. Soc. Zool.
France, vol. xi, p. 211, 1898.

Cervus eanadensis songaricus, Lydekker, Great and Small Game of
Europe, etc. p. 59, 1901, Field, vol. cxi, p. 70, 1908; Ward,
Records of Big Game, ed. 6, p. 45, 1910, ed. 7, p. 45, 1914.

Cervus songaricus, Matschie, Sitzber. Ges. nat. Freunde, 1907, p. 222.

Typical locality the Zungarian Tien-Shan, probably in
the neighbourhood of Kulja.

Very similar to the typical American race, but apparently
distinguished by the narrower and more orange-coloured
rump-patch, not including the middle line of the tail, which
is coloured like the back ; the larger amount of black on the
borders of the rump-patch, thighs, and flanks, the greyer
general colour in summer, and the shorter and stouter fourth
tine of the antlers. Compared with those of the other
Asiatic races, the antlers are stated by Matschie to be
distinguished by their stoutness and the length and massive-
ness of their tines, as well as by their dark colour. From
the trez-tine the beam inclines slightly inwards towards the
root of the fourth tine, which is very large and strongly bent
inwards ; at the root of the fourth tine the beam is markedly
bent inwards and backwards, all the tines on its front
surface being long, stout, parallel, and nearly at right angles
to its axis. The upper portion of the antler in fully deve-
loped specimens is 3-tined, and placed practically in the
same place as the tip of the fourth, and nearly in that of the
tip of the third tine.

The range includes the Tarbagatai district.

79. 11. 21. 50-52. Three shed antlers. Tien-Shan; col-



CERVII'.K 137

lected (luring tlio Second Yarkaud Mission, under Sir Douglas
Forsyth, K.C.S.I., 1873. Co-types of C. custcplianux.

Transferred from India Museum, 1879.
'2. 13. 9. 8. Skin, mounted. Eastern Tien-Shan.

Presented ly St. George Littlcdale, Esq., 1902.
'2. 3. 9. 9. Skull and antlers. Same locality. '

Same history.

14. 9. 15. 8. Skin, imperfect. Chik Jirgalan Nulla,
Tekkes Valley, Tien-Shan.

Presented ly Col. J. W. Allot Anderson, 1914.

H.- Cervus canadensis biedermanni.

Cervns asiaticus sibiricus, Elwes, Journ. Linn. Soc. 1899, p. 32 ; ncc

C. maral sibirica, Severtzoiu.
Cervus biedermanni, Matschie, Sitzber. Gcs. nat. Freunde, 1907,

p. 223.
Cervus canadensis biedermanni, Lydekker, Field, vol. cxi, p. 70, 1908 ;

Ward, Eccords of Big Game, ed. 6, p. 48, 1910, ed. 7, p. 48,

1914.

Typical locality Lake Teletzk, at the source of the Obi,
and Barnaul, somewhat lower down the same valley.

According to Matschie's description, the beam of the
antlers is but slightly curved and forms an almost continuous
line with the axis of the fourth tine, which is relatively
small ; no inward bending occurs till the fourth tine, the tip
forms a long-handled fork, and the maximum span occurs at
the root of the fourth tine, as in the Sayansk race, but the
terminal fork inclines only slightly inwards, so that in a
front view it is concealed by the fourth tine, which in
sibiricus inclines outwards.

No specimen in collection.

I. Cervus canadensis waohei.

Cervus wachei, Noack, Zool. Anz. vol. xxv, p. 145, 1902 ; Matschie,

Sitzber. Ges. nat. Freunde, 1907, p. 228.
Cervus canadensis wachei, LydeMer, Field, vol. cxi, p. 70, 1908.

Typical locality Shingielt Valley, in the neighbourhood
of the Black Irtish, Kobdo, Eastern Zungaria.

Distinguished, according to Matschie, from the three



138 CATALOGUE OF UNGULATES

preceding races by the very strong incurving of the upper
portion of the stout beam of the antlers, in consequence of
which the base of the terminal fork is situated in nearly the
same plane as the root of the trez-tine ; the latter strongly
bent upwards and inwards and separated by a shorter
interval from the fourth tine than it is from the bez-tine ;
while the fourth tine conceals the terminal fork, which
consists of two sub-equal prongs mounted upon a relatively
short shaft.

No specimen in collection.

J. Cervus canadensis baetrianus.

Cervus baetrianus, Lydekker, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. ser. 7, vol. v,

p. 196, 1900.
Cervus hagenbecki, Shitkow, Zool. Jahrb., Syst. vol. xx, p. 91, 1905 ;

= baetrianus, Satunin, Zanucok. Kaukas. Omd. vol. xxv, p. 38,

1905.
Cervus canadensis baetrianus, Lydekker, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1902,

vol. ii, p. 79 ; Ward, Records of Big Game, ed. 6, p. 47, 1908,

ed. 7, p. 47, 1914.

Typical locality Kussian Turkistan, probably Bokhara.

In the under-mentioned specimen the whole margin of
the upper lip is light-coloured, instead of only the front
portion and a patch beside the nostrils, as in the Tien-Shan
and Canadian races ; and the dark patch on each side of the
lower lip does not extend downwards to join a larger patch
on the chin, as in those races, the whole chin being light-
coloured. General colour light grey.

2. 3. 19. 1. Head, mounted. Cherikend, Turkestan.

Presented ly the Duke of Bedford, K.G., 1902.

K. Cervus canadensis wardi.

Cervus canadensis wardi, Lydekker, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1910, p. 987.

Typical locality Sze-chuan border of Tibet.

Known only by antlers, which are lighter and more
slender than those of Sayansk and Tien-Shan wapiti, with
the terminal fork narrower, and the fourth tine smaller.
Not improbably this type of antler may prove to belong to
C. macneilli (infra, p. 145).



CERVID^E 139



10. 5. 14. 1. Two detached antlers. Sze-chuan border
of Tibet ; collected by the Eev. W. N. Fergusson. Type.

Presented by J. Rowland Ward, Esq., 1910.



X.VII. CERVUS YARKANDENSIS.

Ccrvus cashmirianus yarkandensis, Blanford, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1892,
p. 117; Lydekker, Deer of All Lands, p. 88, 1898.

Cervns yarkandensis, Blanford, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1893, p. 447 ;
Lydekker, ibid. 1896, p. 933, Game Animals of India, etc.*
p. 215, 1907, Cat. Hume Bequest Brit. Mus. p. 34, 1913;
Pousargues, Mem. Soc. Zool. France, vol. xi, p. 202, 1898,
partim ; Ward, Records of Big Game, ed. 6, p. 35, 1910, ed. 7,
p. 47, 1914.

Typical locality Maralbashi Forest, Eastern Turkestan ;
the range includes the Tarim Valley.

A rufous-fawn deer, with a large and well-defined orange
rump-patch, which includes the tail, and usually five-tined
antlers, which lack the lateral compression and large fourth
tine of those of the canadensis group, and have the terminal
fork placed at right angles to the middle line of the head,
so as to look directly forwards, and the fifth tine a little
inclined inwards, the beam not showing any marked angula-
tion at the origin of the third tine. By the development of
a third snag to the terminal fork (crown) the antlers may
become 6-tined, as in fig. 25.

79. 11. 21. 252. Skin, young. Yarkand.

Transferred from India Museum, 1879.

89. 6. 8. 3. Skull and antlers. Maralbashi Forest;
collected by Rev. H. Lansdell. Purchased, 1889.

91. 8. 7. 4. Skull and antlers. Same locality; collected
by Mr. A. Dalgliesh. Type ; figured by Blanford, loc. cit.
Length of antlers along outer curve 35 and 34 inches ; basal
girth 6| inches. Presented by A. 0. Hume, Esq., C.B., 1891.

91. 8. 7. 5. Frontlet and antlers. Same locality and
collector. Same history.

92. 3. 30. 1. Skin. Tarim Valley, Eastern Turkestan.
Mentioned by Blanford, loc. cit.

Presented by Major C. S. Cumberland, 1892.

* Name spelt, intentionally, yarcandcnsis.



140 CATALOGUE OF UNGULATES

92. 7. 17. 1. Frontlet and antlers. Maralbashi. Length
of antlers 41^ inches, which is the maximum on record.

Presented by Sir H. A. H. F. Lennard, Bart, 1892.




FIG. 25. SKULL AND ANTLERS OP YABKAND STAG (Cervus yarkandensis).

The development of a third tine in the terminal fork renders this

specimen less typical than most examples.

12. 10. 31. 3. Skull and antlers (fig. 25). Maralbashi;
collected by Mr. A. Dalgliesh. This specimen stands fourth
in Ward's 1910 list. The measurements of the antlers are :
length on outer curve 39 J, girth 6, tip-to-tip 24J, widest inside
span 25 inches. Bequeathed by A. 0. Hume, Esq., C.B., 1912.



141
XVIII. CERVUS WALLICHI.

Cervus wallichi, Cuvier, Ossemens Fossiles, 1812 (teste Pouaarguex),

ed. 3, vol. iv, p. 504, 1825, ed. 4, vol. vi, p. 89, 1835 ; F. Cuvier,

Hist. Nat. Mamm. vol. ii, livr. xxxix, pi. 225 (356), 1823;

H. Smith, Griffith's Animal Kingdom, vol. iv, p. 103, pi. ix, 1827 ;

J. B. Fischer, Synop. Mamm. p. 452, 1829 ; Jardine, Naturalist's

Libr., Mamm. vol. iii, p. 161, pi. x, 1835; Blyth, Journ. Asiat.

Soc. Bengal, vol. x, pt. 2, p. 745, 1841, vol. xxi, p. 341, 1852;

Gray, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1850, p. 227, partim ; Pousargues, Mem.

Soc. Zool. France, vol. xi, p. 195, 1898, partim ; Pocock, Proc.

Zool. Soc. 1912, p. 574 ; LydeTcJcer, Field, vol. cxx, p. 86, 1912,

Cat. Hume Bequest Brit. Mus. p. 32, 1913, Ward's Records of

Big Gam, ed. 7, p. 37, 1914.

Cervus (Harana) wallichi, Hodgson, Ann. Nat. Hist. vol. i, p. 158, 1838.
Cervus (Pseudocervus) wallichi, Hodgson, Journ. Asiat. Soc. Bengal,

vol. x, pt. 2, p. 914, 1841.

Cervus tibetanus, Hodgson, op. cit. vol. xix, p. 460, 1850.
Cervus nariyanus, Hodgson, op. cit. vol. xx, p. 392, pi. viii, 1851.
Cervus affinis, W. L. Sclater, Cat. Mamm. Ind. Mus. pt. ii, p. 184,

1891, partim; LydehJcer, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1909, p. 599, fig. 182;

nee Hodgson.
SHOU.

Typical locality probably the wooded country to the south
of the Mansarowar Lake, in the Nari-Khorsum district of
Tibet, whence the stag to which the typical pair of antlers
belonged appears to have been brought to Maktinath, lying
to the northward of Dwalagiri, central Nepal.

Type a stag in the Vice-Eegal Menagerie at Barrakpur,
near Calcutta ; now represented only by a pair of shed
antlers in the Indian Museum, Calcutta.

Type of Harana and Pseudocervus.

Somewhat inferior in size to a wapiti (shoulder-height
about 4 feet 3 or 4 inches), with a very short tail, the
(normally) 5-tined antlers (fig. 26), strongly angulated at the
origin of the third tine, and above this inclined markedly
forwards and inwards so that the tips of the fifth tines
(which are much larger than the fourth) are more or less
closely approximated ; general colour speckled earthy or pale
fawn brown, with a larger or smaller white rump-patch,
including tail and extending downwards posteriorly on to
back of hams ; * ears long and pointed ; muzzle and chin dark.

* In Pocock's key to this group (Proc. Zool. Soc. 1912, p. 574)
the white on hind-quarters is stated to extend above root of tail in
wallichi and affinis, but not to do so in cashmiriensis (hanglu), and
yet further on affinis is stated to come closest to cashmiriensis in
this respect.



142 CATALOGUE OF UNGULATES

The range apparently includes the Nari Khorsum district
and the neighbourhood of Lhasa, Tibet, and the Chambi
Valley and Bhutan.

The two races are distinguishable as follows :

A. Bump -patch large, undivided by a dark median line C. w. walliclii.

B. Bump-patch smaller, divided more or less com-

pletely by a dark median line C. w. affinis.

A. Cervus wallichi wallichi.

Cervus wallichi wallichi, LydeJcker, Cat. Hume Bequest Brit. Mus.
p. 32, 1913.

Typical locality probably the wooded country south of
the Mansarowar Lake, Nari Khorsum, Western Tibet.

General colour earthy brown ; rump-patch large and
undivided by a median dark line.

15. 5. 11. 1. Pair of antlers shed in 1913 by a stag,
from the neighbourhood of the Mansarowar Lake, presented
to the Zoological Society by H.M. the King. This stag is
the one described when young by the present writer, Proc.
Zool. Soc. 1909, p. 599, and, when grown up, by Pocock,
ibid. 1912, p. 574. Presented ly the Zoological Society, 1914.

B. Cervus wallichi affinis.

Cervus affinis, Hodgson, Journ. Asiat. Soc. Bengal, vol. x, pt. 2,
p. 721, 1841, vol. xix, pp. 466 and 518, 1850, vol. xx, p. 392,
pi. vii, 1851 ; Gray, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1850, p. 228, Cat. Ungulata
Brit. Mus. p. 199, 1852, Cat. Ruminants Brit. Mus. p. 69, 1872,
Hand-List Ruminants Brit. Mus. p. 140, 1873; Gerrard, Cat.
Bones Mamm. Brit. Mus. p. 69, 1862; Jerdon, Mamm. India,
p. 251, 1867 ; Sclater, Trans. Zool. Soc. vol. vii, p. 343, 1871 ;
Brooke, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1878, p. 913 ; Sterndale, Mamm. India,
p. 514, 1884; W. L. Sclater, Cat. Mamm. Ind. Mus. pt. ii,
p. 184, 1891 ; Blanford, Fauna Brit. India, Mamm. p. 537, 1891 ;
LydekJcer, Deer of All Lands, p. 88, 1898, Game Animals of
India, etc. p. 215, 1907 ; Bentham, Cat. Asiat. Horns and Antlers
Ind. Mus. p. 62, 1908 ; Ward, Records of Big Game, ed. 6, p. 37,
1910; Pocock, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1912, p. 572, Field, vol. cxxiv,
p. 613, 1914.

Pseudocervus wallichi, Gray, List Mamm. Brit. Mus. p. 180, 1843.
Cervus walliclii, Pousargues, Mem. Soc. Zool. France, vol. xi, p. 195,
1898, partim.

Cervus walliclii affinis, LydelcJcer, Cat. Hume Bequest Brit. Mus.
p. 32, 1913, Ward's Records of Big Game, ed. 7, p. 37, 1914.



CERVID^E



it:;



SHOU.



Typical locality probably the Chambi Valley of Sikhiiu ;
the range extends into Bhutan and the Tsari district of
Tibet, and apparently also the neighbourhood of Lhasa.

General colour pale fawn-brown, lighter on flanks ; rump-
patch much smaller than in typical race, and more or less




FIG. 26. SKULL AND ANTLERS OF SIKHIM SHOU (Cervus wallichi affinis).

completely divided by a median dark line continuous with
the fawn-brown of the back, and extending on to tail ; in
some cases a darker brown border to front edge of rump-
patch.

The finest known antlers are in the Museum collection,
four specimens in which head Ward's 1910 list.



144 CATALOGUE OF UNGULATES .

45. 1. 8. 94. Skull and antlers. Probably the Chambi
Valley, Sikhim. Type ; figured by Hodgson, Journ. Asiat.
Soc. Bengal, vol. x, p. 722.

Presented ly B. H. Hodgson, Esq., 1845.

57. 12. 14. 2. Skull, with antlers, and skin. Probably
Sikhim or Bhutan ; collected by B. H. Hodgson, Esq.

Transferred from Zoological Society's Museum, 1857.

57.12.14.3. Pair of antlers. Chambi Valley ; collected
by Dr. J. Campbell, Superintendent of Darjiling at the time
of Hooker's Himalayan journeys. Same history.

66. 8. 10. 5. Skull. Locality unknown ; collected by
Dr. Hugh Falconer. Purchased, 1866.

692, /. Frontlet and antlers (in Geological Department).
Locality unknown. No history.

79. 11. 21. 49. Skull and antlers. Locality unknown.
Transferred from India Museum, 1879.

79. 11. 21. 668. Head, mounted. Tibet (?); collected by
B. H. Hodgson, Esq. Same history.

91. 8. 7. 6. Skull and antlers. Northern Bhutan ; collected
by L. Mandelli, Esq.

Presented ly A. 0. Hume, Esq., C.B., 1891.

91. 8. 7. 7. Skull and antlers. Same locality and collector.

Same history.

91. 10. 7. 172. Skin. Sikhim ; same collector.

Presented ly Dr. W. T. Blanford, 1891.

91. 10. 7. 173. Skull and skin, immature. Same locality
and collector. Same history.

12. 10. 31. 4. Skull and antlers (fig. 26). Northern
Bhutan ; same collector. In this specimen, which stands
No. 1 in Ward's 1910 list, the dimensions of the antlers are
as follows : length on outer curve 55f , girth 6J, tip-to-tip 17J,
widest inside span 40 1 inches.

Bequeathed ly A. 0. Hume, Esq., C.B., 1912.

14. 8. 29. 1. Skull, with antlers in velvet, and skin.
Chosam, Tsari district, Tibet. Figured by Pocock, Field,
vol. cxxiv, p. 613. Presented ly Capt. F. M. Bailey, 1914.



CKKVID.K 145



XIX. CERVUS MACNEILLT.

Cervus cashmirianus macneilli, Lydekker, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1909

p. 588, pi. Ixix, 1910, p. 987.
Cervus macneilli, Pococh, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1912, p. 571.

Typical locality Sze-clman border of Tibet.

Antlers (in C. m. kansuensis) 5-tined, but of a more wapiti-
like type than in the preceding species, the two tines of the
terminal fork being apparently in a fore-and-aft plane, or
nearly so ; general colour ranging from light speckled grey
to speckled brown, with the white of the hind-quarters
restricted to back of hams, the middle line of tail dark, and
a blackish brown patch on croup, replacing the white one of
C. walliclii affinis ; ears and muzzle of the same type as in
latter.

Whether the antlers described under the name of C. cana-
densis wardi (supra, p. 138) really belong to this species,
remains to be proved.

The distributional area extends from the Sze-chuan
border of Tibet to Kan-su and Yun-nan.

The two races are distinguished as follows :

A. General colour grey, tail almost wholly black

above C. m. macneilli.

B. General colour brown, tail with a sinous black

median line ,. C. m. hanstiensis.



A. Cervus macneilli macneilli.

General colour pale speckled French grey, becoming
somewhat darker on back and still more decidedly so on
head, with the greater part of upper side of tail black. Male
unknown.

Typical locality Sze-chuan border of Tibet.

9. 5. 31. 1. Skin, female, mounted. Sze-chuan border of
Tibet.* Type. Presented ly Major M. Macneill, 1909.

* In the original description the locality was given as Sze-chuan.



IV.



146 CATALOGUE OF UNGULATES



B. Cervus maeneilli kansuensis.

Cervus kansuensis, Pocock, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1912. p. 573 ; Wallace,
Big Game of Central and Western China, pp. 195 and 296, 1913.*
Cervus maeneilli kansuensis, Lydekker, Field, vol. cxx, p. 860, 1912.

Typical locality Kan-su, China.

General colour speckled brown ; tail with an irregular
sinuous median dark line on upper surface. The finest pair
of antlers recorded by Wallace measure 43^ inches in length
along the curve, witli a basal girth of 5J, and a tip-to-tip
interval of 37 inches.

The range apparently includes Yunnan.

12. 7. 26. 16. Skin, female. Thirty miles S.E. of



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