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Catalogue of the ungulate mammals in the British Museum (Natural History) (Volume 4) online

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Ward, Records of Big Game, ed. 6, p. 85, 1910, ed. 7, p. 85,
1914.

Typical locality Kenai Peninsula, Alaska.

Type in American Museum of Natural History, New
York.

As dark as R. t. montanus, but with a heavy white
throat-fringe ; size large ; antlers somewhat larger than
those of other members of the Woodland Group, and thus
approaching those of the Barren-Ground Group.

4. 5. 27. 1. Head, mounted. Alaska. Eeference to this
race provisional. Purchased, 1904.

M. Rangifer tarandus fortidens.

Rangifer forfcidens, Hollister, Smithson. Misc. Collect, vol. Ivi, no. 35,
p. 3, 1912 ; Miller, List N. Amer. Mamm. p. 392, 1912.

Typical locality Alberta, Canada.
Type in U.S. National Museum.



252 CATALOGUE OF UNGULATES

The largest of the caribou, exceeding in point of size the
biggest examples of R. t. montanus and R. t. osborni; general
colour, inclusive of under-parts, very dark; lower incisors
of the type of those of R. t. caribou; cheek-teeth larger
than in any other American race ; antlers stout and broadly
palmated, shorter and thicker than in R. t. osborni, with the
beam nearly straight ; females usually without antlers.

No specimen in collection.

N. Rangifer tarandus osborni.

Rangifer osborni, Allen, Bull. Amer. Mus. Nat. Hist. vol. xvi, p. 149,
1992 ; Grant, 1th Rep. New Yor7c Zool. Soc. p. 5, 1902 ; Miller,
List N. Amer. Mamm. p. 393, 1912.

Rangifer tarandus osborni, Ward, Records of Big Game, ed. 6, p. 85,
1910, ed. 7, p. 85, 1914.

Typical locality Cassiar Mountains, British Columbia.

Type in American Museum of Natural History, New
York.

This and the next race are dark-coloured mountain
caribou, with antlers of the Barren-Ground type, but the
bodily size much greater than in R. t. arcticus.

The present race is characterised by the brown colour of
the autumn coat and the large amount of white on the rump
and the hind half of the under surface of the body; the
whole neck and shoulders, as well as the back and limbs,
being much lighter than in the Selkirk race. As the antlers
correspond in form and proportion with those of the Barren-
Ground caribou, they serve to connect the Selkirk race with
the latter.

5. 1. 16. 2. Skull and antlers. Ogilvie Mountains,
Alaska. Presented ly F. C. Selous, Esq., 1905.

6. 10. 10. 1. Head, mounted, with abnormal palmation
of tips of antlers. Dease Lake, British Columbia.

Presented In/ G. M. Norris, Esq., 1906.

7. 3. 11. 1. Skin, mounted. Yukon.

Presented by F. C. Selous, Esq., 1907.



253



0. Rangifer tarandus granti.

Rangifer granti, Allen, Bull. Amer. Mus. Nat. Hist. vol. xvi, p. 192,
1902 ; Grant, 1th Eep. N. York Zool. Soc. p. 5. 1902 ; Stone and
Cram, American Animals, p. 54, 1903; Hollister, Smithson.
Misc. Collect, vol. Ivi, no. 35, p. 7, 1912 ; Miller, List N. Amer.
Mamm. p. 392, 1912.

Eangifer tarandus granti, Ward, Records of Big Game, ed. 6, p. 85,
1910, ed. 7, p. 85, 1914.

Western end of Alaskan Peninsula, opposite Popoff
Island.

Type in American Museum of Natural History, New
York.

Nearly related to the preceding race, but distinguished
by details of colouring, and apparently by the markedly
hypsodont cheek-teeth. From E. t. stonei it differs not only
by its longer antlers and inferior bodily size, but also in
coloration and the characters of the skull. General colour
dark brown, varying somewhat according to season, with a
large white rump-patch and white tail, through the middle
line of the upper surface of which runs a dark streak ; this
white rump-patch serving at once to distinguish R. t. granti
from E. t. stonei, in which the whole of the hind-quarters
are dark-coloured. This caribou apparently inhabits an
isolated area formed by the treeless districts of the Alaskan
Peninsula and some of the adjacent islands, from at least
one of which it has been exterminated.

No specimen in collection.



P. Rangifer tarandus exeelsifrons.

Rangifeu exeelsifrons, Hollister, Smithson. Misc. Collect, vol. Ivi,
no. 35, p. 5, 1912 ; Miller, List N. Amer. Mamm. p. 392, 1912.

Typical locality Meade Valley, near Point Barrow,
Alaska.

Type in U.S. National Museum, Washington.

Described from the skull, which is characterised by its
shortness and breadth, with the brain-case much elevated,
and the hollow between the orbits deep and rounded ; teeth
of the general type of those of E. t. arcticus. A some-



254 CATALOGUE OF UNGULATES

what similar elevation of the frontal region is exhibited in
the skull of R. t. grcenlaudicus, which is, however, of a
narrow type.

No specimen in collection.

Q. Rangrifer tarandus arcticus.

Cervus tarandus arcticus, Richardson, Fauna Bor.-Amer. p. 23, 1829.
Tarandus arcticus, Baird, Rep. Comm. Patents, 1851, vol. ii, Agric.

p. 105, 1852.
Kangifer arcticus, Allen, Bull. Amer. Mus. Nat. Hist. vol. viii, p. 234,

1896 ; Elliot, Synop. Mamm. N. Amer. (Field Mus. Zool. Pub.

vol. ii) p. 37, 1901, Cat. Mamm. Field Mus. (op. cit. vol. viii)

p. 41, 1907; Grant, 7th Rep. New York Zool. Soc. p. 5, 1902;

Stone and Cram, American Animals, p. 53, 1903 ; Hollister,

Smithson. Misc. Collect, vol. Ivi, no. 35, pi, i, 1912 ; Miller, List

N. Amer. Mamm. p. 391, 1912.

Rangifer tarandus arcticus, LydeTcher, Deer of All Lands, p. 47, 1898,
Great and Small Game of Europe, etc. p. 38, 1901 ; Ward,
Records of Big Game, ed. 6, p. 84, 1910, ed. 7, p. 84, 1914.

BARREN-GROUND CARIBOU.

Typical locality Fort Enterprise, Mackenzie district,
Canada.

Size relatively small. Antlers (fig. 44) very long, slender,
and rounded, with few points on the expanded portion of the
beam, which is separated by a long interval from the third
tine ; the latter, which is but slightly palmated, generally
with one of the basal tines more or less expanded ; back-
tine usually, if not always, wanting; female-antlers much
smaller, simpler, and scarcely curved at all. General colour
in summer clove-brown, mingled with reddish and yellowish
brown, under-parts white ; in winter entire coat dirty white ;
lower incisors diminishing suddenly in size from the middle
to the outer pair, which are very small.

51. 10. 24. 1. Skull and antlers. Arctic America.

Purchased (Argent), 1851.

55. 5. 14. 2 (702, w). Skeleton and antlers. Arctic
America ; collected by Dr. J. Eae. Purchased, 1855.

7. 9. 4. 7. Skull and antlers. Baffinland.

Presented ly Crawford Nolle, Esq., 1907.




FIG. 44 SIDE VIEW OP SKULL AND ANTLERS OF BARREN-GROUND CARIBOU

(Rangifer tarandus arcticus), to show " Barren-Ground" type of antlers.

From 1th Il>-p. X. York Zwl. Soc.



256 CATALOGUE OF UNGULATES



R. Rangifer tarandus grcenlandieus.

Cervus tarandus grcelandicus, Gmelin, 'Linn's Syst. Nat. vol. i, p. 177,

1788.
Rangifer grcenlandicus, Baird, N. Amer. Mamm. p. 634, 1857 ; Caton,

Deer and Antelope of N. America, p. 105, 1877 ; Allen, Bull

Amer. Mus. Nat. Hist. vol. viii, p. 234, 1896; Elliot, Synop.

Mamm. N. Amer. (Field Mus. Zool. Pub. vol. ii) p. 37, 1901 ;

Grant, 1th Rep. New York Zool. Soc. p. 5, 1902; Stone and

Cram, American Animals, p. 54, 1903 ; Hollister, Smithson.

Misc. Collect, vol. Ivi, no. 35, p. 5, 1912 ; Miller, List N. Amer.

Mamm. p. 393, 1912.
Rangifer tarandus grcerilandicus, LydeJcker, Deer of All Lands, p. 47,

1898, Great and Small Game of Europe, etc. p. 37, 1901 ; Ward,

Records of Big Game, ed. 6, p. 85, 1910, ed. 7, p. 85, 1914.

Typical locality Greenland.

Closely allied to R. t. arcticus, with a broad sharply
defined white ring round each eye, and distinct broad white
bands above the hoofs ; skull with an elevated frontal region
comparable to that of R. t. excelsifrons, but markedly narrower.

10. 1. 20. 1. Skull and antlers. Greenland.

Presented ly Sir Robert Harvey, Bart,, 1910.

S. Rangifer tarandus pearyi.

Rangifer pearyi, Allen, Bull. Amer. Mus. Nat. Hist. vol. xvi, p. 409,
1902 ; Grant, 1th Rep. New York Zool. Soc. p. 5, 1902 ; Miller,
List N. Amer. Mamm. p. 393, 1912.

Typical locality Ellesmereland, Lat. 79 JST.

Type in American Museum of Natural History, New
York.

Wholly white at all seasons, with the exception of a
large slaty grey area, larger in females than in males, on
the middle and hind part of the back ; the long and thick
coat softer and finer than in the Greenland race, which is
much darker.

No specimen in collection.

The following specimens are not racially determined :-

46. 4. 25. 23. Frontlet and antlers. North America.

Purchased (Argent), 1846.

65. 10. 34. 5 (702, x). Skull and antlers. North
America. Presented by A. Murray, Esq., 1865.



CERVID^l 257



XV. Genus HYDROPOTES.

Hydropotes, Swinhoe, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1870, p. 89; Brooke, ibid.
1872, p. 522, 1878, p. 916 ; Garrod, ibid. 1877, p. 780 ; Riitimeyer,
Abh. scluvciz.pal. Ges. vol. viii, p. 21, 1881 ; Pocock. Proc. Zool
Soc. 1910, p. 956; nee Hydropota, BontJani, 1861.

Hydrelaphus, Lydckker, Deer of All Lands, p. 219, 1898 ; Troiiessart,
Cat. Mamm., Suppl. p. 691, 1905; Elliot, Cat. Mamm. Field
Mits. (Field Mus. Zool. Pub. vol. viii) p. 37, 1907.

Lateral metacarpals as in Odocoilcus, that is to say, repre-
sented by their lower extremities ; antlers wanting ; muzzle
with a large naked area surrounding nostrils ; ears moderate,
narrow, and pointed ; tail very short ; face rather long ; coat
uniformly coloured in adult, spotted in young; no metatarsal
or tarsal glands ; lachrymal pits of skull small but deep ; face-
glands small ; hind-pasterns with a gland forming a deep
interdigital cleft, as in Dama, and hoofs united at heels by
a fold of skin, no distinct gland in fore-feet ; lateral hoofs of
moderate size ; upper canines forming long, curved, and
slightly convergent tusks (fig. 45), which grow from semi-
persistent pulps, those of females smaller ; cheek-teeth
tall-crowned. Size small. In old animals the pulp-cavity
of the upper canines obliterates. The auditory bullae are
greatly inflated, and the hind angle of the lower jaw is much
produced backwards, forming a compressed semicircular
process projecting behind the level of the condyle; the
vomer does not divide the aperture of the posterior nostrils.

The distribution is restricted to China and Korea.



HYDROPOTES INERMIS.

Hydropotes inermis, Swinhoe, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1870, p. 89 ; Hamilton,
ibid. 1871, p. 258, 1873, p. 473 ; Brooke, ibid. 1872, p. 522, 1878,
p. 916 ; Gray, Cat. Ruminants Brit. Mus. p. 95, 1872, Hand-
List Ruminants Brit. Mus. p. 166, 1873 ; Garrod, Proc. Zool.
Soc. 1877, p. 789 ; Forbes, ibid. 1882, p. 636 ; Flower and Garson,
Cat. Osteol. Mus. R. Coll. Surg. pt. ii, p. 321, 1884 ; Flower and
Lydekker, Study of Mammals, p. 32S, 1891 ; LydeJcker, Horns
and Hoofs, p. 322, 1893 ; Hilzheimer, Abh. Mus. Naturkunde
Magdeburg, vol. i, p. 171, 1906; Pocock, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1910,
p. 956.

Hydropotes affinis, Brooke, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1872, p. 524 ; Hilzheimer,
Abh. Mus. Naturkunde Magdeburg, vol. i, p. 171, 1906.
IV. s



258 CATALOGUE OF UNGULATES

(?) Hydropotes argyropus, Heude, C. R. Ac. Sci. Paris, vol. xcviii,

p. 1017, 1884; Hilzheimer, Abh. Mus. Naturkunde Magdeburg,

vol. i, p. 171, 1906.
Hydrelaphus inermis, Lydekker, Deer of All Lands, p. 221, pi. xvii,

fig. 2, 1898, Great and Small Game of Europe, etc. p. 266, 1901 ;

Trouessart, Cat. Mamm., Suppl. p. 691, 1905; Elliot, Cat.

Mamm. Field Mus. (Field Mus. Zool. Pub. vol. viii) p. 89, 1907 ;

Allen, Bull. Mus. Harvard Coll. vol. xl, p. 204, 1912.
Hydropotes kreyenbergi, Hilzheimer, Zool. Anz. vol. xxix, p. 298,

1905, AbJi. Mus. NaturJcunde Magdeburg, vol. i, p. 171, pi. ii,

1906 ; Allen, Bull. Mus. Harvard Coll. vol. xl, p. 205, 1912.

CHINESE WATER-DEER.

Typical locality Chin-kiang, China.

Height at shoulder about 20 inches ; hairs coarse and
thick, longest on neck and rump, on back and sides flattened
and undulated from side to side ; general colour light rufous
chestnut, stippled with blackish, the rufous most marked on
head and backs of ears ; the individual hairs greyish white
from the base for the greater part of their length, then
blackish brown, and finally light chestnut, the dark rings
giving the stippled appearance to the coat ; neck paler than
back ; shoulders, limbs, and tail brownish chestnut ; under-
parts, front of thighs, chin, throat, a narrow band on muzzle,
a mark above each eye, and inner surfaces of ears white or
whitish ; young sparsely and indistinctly marked with white
spots running in longitudinal lines, especially on hind-
quarters, and the hair of back softer than in adults, and
uniformly chestnut, without annulations.

The range extends from the Yang-tsi-kiang Valley to
Korea (H. argyropus).

70. 7. 18. 15 (1551, a). Skull and skin. Island in
Yang-tsi-kiang, near Chin-kiang; purchased in Shanghai
market, November, 1868, by E. Swinhoe, Esq. Type.

Purchased, 1870.

72. 9. 3. 4 (1551, b). Skull and skin. Same locality and
collector. Purchased, 1872.

72. 9. 3. 5 (1551, e). Skull and skin. Shanghai (? mar-
ket) ; same collector. Same history.

72. 9. 3. 6 (1551, d). Skull and head-skin, immature.
Same locality and collector. Same history.

72. 9. 3. 7 (1551, e). Skeleton, mounted, and head-skin.
Same locality and collector. Same history.



76. 4. 4. 1 (1551, /). Skeleton and imperfect skin, albino.
Locality unknown. Purchased (Bartlett), 1876.

77. 7. 6. 1. Uterus, with live foetuses, in spirit. Yaug-
tsi Valley. Presented by Dr. G. K. Barton, 1877.

80. 3. 30. 6-7. Two skulls. Wuku, near Kiu-kiang,
Haukau district ; collected by C. Maries, Esq. This is the
typical locality (misprinted Kinkian in Hilzheimer's 1906
description) of H. kreyenlcrgi, and is much too near Chin-
kiang to admit of its water-deer being even racially distinct
from the typical form of the species. Purchased, 1880.

88. 11. 31. 2-3. Two foetuses, in spirit, Kiu-kiang;
collected by F. W. Styan, Esq. Purchased, 1888.




FIG. 45. SKULL OF CHINESE WATEE-DEEB (Hydropotcs incrmis).

0. 6. 27. 5. Skin, young. Pao-chi, Shen-si.

Presented ty Father Huyh, 1900.

0. 10. 30. 1. Skin, female, mounted. Island in the
Yang-tsi-kiaug. Presented by the Dulce of Bedford, K.G., 1900.

1. 3. 2. 22. Skull and skin. Ka-shing, Yang-tsi Valley.

Presented by F. W. Styan, Esq., 1901.
6. 5. 14. 3. Skull and head-skin, female, Chin-kiang.

Presented ly J. de La Touche, Esq., 1906.

6. 12. 5. 14-15. Two skulls. Chin-kiang. Same history.

7. 7. 3. 32. Skull. North China.

Presented ly E. B. Hoivell, Esq., 1907.

8. 7. 25. 43. Skin. Kun-tun, north-western Fo-kien.

Presented ly J. de La Touche, Esq., 1908.

s 2



260 CATALOGUE OF UNGULATES

8. 11. 14. 8-12. Five skulls, of which at least two are
female. Shanghai. Presented ~by F. W. Sty an, Esq., 1908.

13. 9. 13. 19. Skull and skin. Hwong-ti-tsze, Hupei ;

collected by Mr. W. E. Zappey. By exchange with

Museum of Harvard College, U.S.A., 1913.



SECTION B. TRAGULINA.

Chevrotains, or Mouse-Deer, as the members of this
group are commonly termed, are small artiodactyle ungulates
resembling the Pecora (vol. i, p. 8) in the absence of upper
incisors and in the possession of the power of ruminating,
but differing in that the stomach has only three (in place of
four) chambers, and by the complete development of the
lateral metacarpals. Horns or antlers are invariably lacking ;
and the main metacarpals and metatarsals may either remain
separate or may be respectively fused into cannon-bones ; the
fibula of the hind-leg is complete; and the navicular, cuboid,
and ectocuneiform elements of the tarsus are united into a
single bone. Four teats ; placenta diffuse. Face-glands,
together with lachrymal pits and vacuities in the skull,
invariably wanting, as are also tarsal and metatarsal glands.
The feet are of a primitive type, the web on the .hind aspect
of the pasterns consisting of a fold of skin which stops short
midway between the lateral hoofs and the heels ; the back of
the pasterns being open in its lower half, while the front
.shows a long triangular depression, with its apex reaching the
line of the lateral hoofs. Upper canines in males long and
tusk-like (fig. 46).

The range includes the tropical and subtropical forest-
tracts of south-eastern Asia and the African equatorial forest-
zone.

FAMILY TRAGULDLE.

As this is the only family of the section, its characters
may be taken to be the same as those of the latter. It is
divisible into the following two generic groups :



TRAGULIDyK 261

A. Main metacarpals and metatarsals fused, respec-

tively, into cannon-bones, feet relatively long and

slender, with the lateral toes small Tranulns.

B. Main metacarpals and metatarsals * separate, feet

shorter and stouter, with the lateral toes larger... Dorcatherium.



I. Genus TRAGULUS.

Tragulus, Pallas, Spicil. Zool. fasc. xiii, p. 27, 1779 ; Milne-Edwards,
Ann. Sci. Nat. Zool. ser. v, vol. ii, p. 49, 1864 ; Blanford, Fauna
Brit. India, Mamm. p. 554, 1891 ; Merriam, Science, ser. 2,
vol. i, p. 375, 1895 ; Stone and Rehn, Proc. Ac. Nat. Sci. Philad.
1902, p. 128; Bonhote, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. ser. 7, vol xi,
p. 296, 1903 ; Pocock, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1910, p. 979.

Memina, Gray, Med. Eepos. vol. xv, p. 307, 1821 ; nee G. Fischer,
1814.

Meminna, Ayassiz, Nomenclator Zool., Mamm. p. 20, 1842 ; Gray,
List. Mamm. Brit. Mus. pp. xxvii and 172, 1843.

Size small; main metacarpals and metatarsals fused,
respectively, into cannon-bones; feet relatively long and
slender ; muzzle with a large bare muffle ; coat fine and
close ; with characteristic light markings on throat and chest ;
skull elongated and compressed anteriorly, with premaxille
reaching nasals; dentition: i. J, c. ^, p. jj, m. |, the molars
selenodont and short-crowned, and the premolars in appo-
sition with one another and their crowns triangular in
profile ; tail short or medium.

Eestricted to the forest-tracts of south-eastern Asia.

The typical forms of the four species here recognised are
respectively characterised as follows :

A. Upper-parts spotted with white ; chin and throat

fully haired T. mcminna.

B. Upper-parts not spotted ; skin of area between

branches of lower jaw bare and glandular.

a. General colour tending to dark smoky grey, at

least on flanks, size larger, length of hind-foot

about 5 - to 6 inches T. javanicus.

b. General colour, at least on flanks and edges of

belly, rufous.

b'. General colour bright rufous ; nape not darker

than back ; size medium T. Stanley anus.

c' . Back greyish, brightening to rufous on flanks ;
a dark, sometimes black, nuchal stripe ; size
smaller ; length of hind-foot about 4$ to 5
inches T. Tiancliil.

'* These may more or less completely fuse in old age.



262 CATALOGUE OF UNGULATES

In referring all the unspotted chevrotains (with a possible
reservation in the case of one or two forms) to three specific
types or groups, the writer follows the lead of Bonhote, who
in 1903 stated that he could not agree with those who, while
using trinomials for continental races, refuse to allow them
for insular races, on the plea that, as intermediate forms do
not exist, they must be regarded as separate species. On the
contrary, it is in every way much simpler and easier to look
upon island forms, which are extraordinarily numerous, in
the light of local races, or incipient species, referable to a few
variable specific types. When these races are very numerous,
this renders it practically impossible to give a full definition
of the species, or a " key " to its local forms ; and in such
cases the only course is to give the leading characteristics of
the typical form under the specific heading, and the local
variations from this type under the headings of the \ arious
races. Even size cannot be taken as a definite specific
character, since one of the island forms included under the
heading of the larger T. javanicus is scarcely superior in
stature to the smaller T. Jcanchil.



I. TEAGULUS MEMINNA.

Moschus meminna, Erxleben, Syst. Eegn. Anim. p. 322, 1777 ; Sykes,
Proc. Zool. Soc. 1831, p. 104; Elliot, Madras Journ. vol. x,
p. 220, 1839 ; TicJcell, Calcutta Journ. Nat. Hist. vol. i, p. 420,
1841 ; Blyth, Journ. Asiat. Soc. Bengal, vol. xi, p. 96, 1842 ;
Tennent, Nat. Hist. Ceylon, p. 58, 1861.

Meminna indica, Gray, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1836, p. 63, List Mamm.
Brit. Mus. p. 172, 1843, Cat. Ungulata Brit. Mus. p. 246, 1852,
Cat. Ruminants Brit. Mus. p. 97, 1872, Hand-List Ruminants
Brit. Mus. p. 167, 1873 ; Kelaa.rt, Prodromus Faunae Zeylan.
p. 81, 1852 ; Gerrard, Cat. Bones Mamm. Brit. Mus. p. 269,
1862 ; Blyth, Cat. Mamm. Mus. Asiat. Soc. Bengal, p. 155, 1863 ;
Jerdon, Mamm. India, p. 269, 1867 ; McMaster, Notes on Jerdon,
p. 98, 1870; Sterndale, Mamm. India, p. 516, 1884.

Tragulus mimenoides, Hodgson, Journ. Asiat. Soc. Bengal, vol. x,
p. 914, 1841.

Meminna malaccensis, Gray, List Mamm. Brit. Mus. p. 172, 1843.

Tragulus meminna,* Milne-Edwards, Ann. Sci. Nat., Zool. ser. 5,
vol. ii, p. 160, pi. x, 1864 ; Blyth, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1864, p. 483 ;
W. L. Sclater, Cat. Mamm. Ind. Mus. pt. ii, p. 189, 1891 ;
Thomas, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1891, p. 385 ; Blanford, Fauna Brit.
India, Mamm. p. 555, 1891 ; Flower and LydekTter, Study of

* Frequently spelt memminna.



Ti;.\<;ruh.K



263



Mammals, p. 306, 1893 ; Merriam, Science, ser. 2, vol. i, p. 375,
1895 ; Lydekker, Great and Small Game of India, etc. p. 253,
1900, Game Animals of India, etc. p. 272, 1907 ; Bonhote, Ann.
Mag. Nat. Hist. ser. 7, vol. xi, p. 296, 1903 ; Hauxwell, Journ.
Bombay Nat. Hist. Soc. vol. xviii, p. 902, 1908.

INDIAN CHEVROTAIN, or MOUSE-DEER : MEMMINNA.

Typical locality probably southern India; the range
includes the larger forests of Peninsular India and Ceylon,
and, according to Hauxwell, Burma.

The type species (vide Merriam, op. cit.).

Size relatively large, shoulder-height 10 to 12 inches,
basal skull-length about 3|- inches (97 mm.); no naked




FIG. 46. SKULL OF INDIAN CHEVROTAIN (Tragulus mcminna).

glandular area on under side of chin and throat ; tarsus hairy
all round, except behind, close to the hocks; tail short;
general colour brown, darker or paler, minutely speckled
with yellow; the individual hairs brown at base, black
towards end, with a yellow ring a short distance from tip ;
sides spotted with white or buff on a brown ground, the spots
elongate and passing into longitudinal bands ; under-parts
white ; throat with three white stripes, one in the middle
pointed in front, and an oblique one on each side.
50, a. Skin, young. Madras.

Presented ly Sir Walter Elliot.



264 CATALOGUE OF UNGULATES

38. 3. 13. 47. Skin, young, formerly mounted. Northern
Circars ; collected by Mr. J. Turner. Purchased, 1838.

42. 5. 26. 19. Skin, formerly mounted. Locality
unknown; collected by J. Gould, Esq. Type of M.
malaccensis. Purchased, 1842.

45. 8. 12. 9 (679, a). [ Skull and skin (formerly mounted),

46. 4. 10. 10. | immature female. Eastern Ghats.
Skull figured in Gray's Catalogue of Ungulata, 1852.

Purchased (Bartlett), 1845.

47. 4. 10. 3. Skin, female, formerly mounted. India.

Purchased (Zoological Society), 1847.
67. 4. 12. 431. Spirit-specimen. Locality unknown.

Lidth de Jeude Collection, purchased, 1867.

76. 5. 30. 5. Skull and skin. Peradenya, Ceylon ;
collected by E. Boate, Esq. Purchased, 1876.

77. 3. 14. 1. Skull and skin, female. Kandy, Ceylon;
collected by A. Whyte, Esq. Purchased, 1877.

77. 11. 1. 8. Skin, young. Same locality and collector.

Same history.

79.11.21.588. Skin, immature. Dekhan; collected
by Col. T. Sykes. Transferred from India Museum, 1879.
79. 11. 21. 657. Skin. Same locality and collector.

Same history.
91. 6. 8. 1. Spirit specimen. No locality.

Presented ~by Sir W. J. Ingram, Bart., 1891.
94. 10. 21. 6. Skin, young. Trivandrum, Travancore.

Presented by H. S. Ferguson, Esq., 1894.
1. * * *. Skull. India.

Presented ~by E. Lydekker, Esq., 1901.
4. 1. 12. 1. Skin, female, mounted. Ceylon.

Purchased (Gerrard), 1904.

12. 11. 28. 124. Skin, mounted, and skull. Hulekal,
near Sirsi, Kanara ; collected by G. C. Shortridge, Esq.

Presented by the Bombay Natural
History Society, 1912.

12. 11. 28. 125. Skull and skin, female. Same locality
and collector. Same history.

13. 8. 22. 88. Skull and skin, female. Chamarajnagar,
south Mysore ; same collector.

Presented by E. Van Ingen, Esq., 191 o.



THAGULIDJ-: 265

13. 8. 22. 89. Skull and skin, female. Wokkoli, south
Coorg ; same collector.

Presented It/ the Bombay Natural History Society, 1913.



II. TBAGULUS STANLEY ANUS.

Moschus (Tragulus) stanleyanus, Gray, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1836, p. 65.

Tragulus stanleyanus, Gray, Knowsley Menagerie, pi. xxxiii, 1850,
Cat. Ungulata Brit. Mus. p. 249, 1852, Cat. Ruminants Brit.



Online LibraryBritish Museum (Natural History). Dept. of ZoologyCatalogue of the ungulate mammals in the British Museum (Natural History) (Volume 4) → online text (page 21 of 36)