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Catalogue of the ungulate mammals in the British Museum (Natural History) (Volume 4) online

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1902, p. 131 ; Miller, Proc. Biol. Soc. Washington, vol. xvi,

p. 37, 1905.
Tragulua kanchil pelandoc, Bonhote, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. ser. 7,

vol. xi, p. 296, 1903.
Tragulus focalinus, Miller, Proc. Biol. Soc. Washington, vol. xvi,

p. 35, 1905.
Tragulus kanchil focalinus, Trouessart, Cat. Mamm., Suppl. p. 690,

1904.

Typical locality Java.

Miller has stated that Hamilton Smith's Moschus pelandoc
cannot be definitely identified, but that it appears to be
nearly allied to the typical Sumatran T. kanchil; and he
accordingly proposed a new name for such specimens of
Javan kanchil s as came under his observation. Until, how-
ever, the so-called T. focalinus can be definitely proved to
be distinct from T.. k. pelandoc, it may be regarded as
inseparable therefrom.

A grey-necked race specially characterised by the great
width and distinctiveness of the tawny eyebrow-stripes and
the contrast between the grizzled grey of the neck and the
tawny head and body ; no dark nuchal stripe ; throat-
markings normal. General colour raw-sienna, gradually
paling, through buff, to creamy buff on flanks ; hairs drab
with black tips, the latter producing a faint dark clouding
on back but not on flanks ; neck coarsely grizzled grey, the
hairs black with a buffish terminal or subterminal ring;
crown blackish, its hair with inconspicuous tawny annula-
tions ; skull with a shorter muzzle and narrower auditory
bullse than in typical race.

Bonhote remarked that one specimen which came under
his notice resembled the type of the present race on the
throat and the typical kanchil on the nape.

51 a, 52. Two skins of fawns. Java ; collected by
Dr. T. Horsfield. Presented ly the Hon. East India Co.



293



9. 1. 5. 834.
Vries Bay, Java



Skull and skin. Parigandaran, Dirk-de-
collected by G. C. Shortridge, Esq.

Presented ly W. E. Balston, Esq., 1909.
ality and collector.

Same history.
ality and collector.

Same history.
ality and collector.

Same history.
Same locality and

Same history.
Same locality and

Same history.
Same locality and

Same history.
Same locality and

Same history.
ing female. Same

Same history.
Same locality and

Same history.
Same locality and

Same history.
ing female. Same
locality and collector. Same history.

9. 1. 5. 850. Skull and skin. Batavia, Java; same



9. 1. 5. 837.
9. 1. 5. 838.


Skull and skin.
Skull and skin.


Same Ic
Same k


9. 1. 5. 839.


Skull and skin.


Same Ic


9. 1.


5.


840.


Skull


and


skin,


female.


collector.














9. 1.


5.


841.


Skull


and


skin,


female.


collector,














9. 1.


B.


842.


Skin,


female, mounted.


collector.


9. 1.


5..


843.


Skull


and


skin,


female.


collector.














9. 1.


5.


844.


Skull


and


skin,


very y(


locality and collector.


9. 1.


5.


845.


Skull


and


skin,


female.


collector.














9. 1.


5.


847.


Skull


and


skin,


female.


collector














9. 1.


5.


848.


Skull


and


skin,


very y<



collector.
9. 1. 5.



851. Skull and skin, female.



Same history.
Tassik-malaja,

Preanger, Java ; same collector. Same history.

9. 1. 5. 852. Skull and skin, female. Tjilatjap, Java ;

same collector. Same history.

9. 1. 5. 853. Skull and skin, female. Same locality and

collector. Sam.e history.

KACIALLY UNDETERMINED SPECIMENS, OF WHICH
THE LOCALITIES ARE UNKNOWN.

45. 11. 24. 2. Skin. Purchased (Thomas), 1845.

47. 4. 30. 3. ) Skin, mounted, and imperfect

47. 4. 30. 9 (079, &). ) skeleton, immature female.

Purchased (Zoological Society), 1847.



294



CATALOGUE OF UNGULATES



48. 11. 5. 2 (853, &). Skull, female. No history.

50. 11. 22. 28 (853, a). Skull, immature.

Purchased (Zoological Society), 1850.
53. 8. 29. 39. Skin, five-days'-old fawn.

Purchased (Zoological Society), 1853.
56. 5. 6. 67. Skull. Presented by W. Theobald, Esq., 1856.
60. 3. 18. 29 (853, h). Skeleton, female, mounted.

Purchased (Zoological Society), 1860.

67. 4. 12. 294-6-7. Three skulls, immature.

Lidth de Jeude Collection, purchased, 1867.

68. 12. 29. 36 (853, g). Skeleton, mounted.

Purchased (Zoological Society), 1886.

MEASUREMENTS, IN MILLIMETRES, OF ADULT KHIO-LINGA CHEVROTAINS.

(From Miller.)



Name.


Locality.


Sex.


Total
length.


Head
and
body.


Tail.


Hind
foot.


Hind

foot
with-
out
hoofs.


T. stanleyanus formosus


Pulo Bintang


Male


620


540


80


142


129





M


J?


600


530


70


137


124


s> j j


yj


Female


650


570


80


143


\m








693


593


100


145


131


T. jaranicus lutcscens


Pulo Sugi Bawa




COO


510


90


131


117






Male


563


488


75


131


117


3 > M


Pulo Jan


Female


592


505


87


129


115






Male


575


503


72


130


118


T. stanleyanus perflamis


Pulo Batam


Female


620


535


85


135


122


T. jai-anicufi pretiostts


Liuga


Male


625


545


80


135


120


)>




Female


628


548


80


138


124


T. jamnicvs pretiellus


Pulo Bakong




675
605


565
515


90
90


140
122


125

108








575


500


75


123


107






Male


533


473


60


119


105





Pulo Sebang




615


535


SO


135


119


IT. javanicus nigrocinctus


Pulo Kundur




610
575


525
490


85

85


138
137


123

122








625


525


100


142


128





pj


Female




537




137


120




. -




598


513


85


140


126


T. javanicus nigncollis


Sin'kep


Male


620


540


80


138


123


) J )







655


570


85


143


130






Female


645


560


85


143


128


T. kanchil rubeus"


Pulo Bintang


Male


670
540


590
465


80
75


147
119


133
106








612


547


65


118


105






Female


543


478


65


125


113


T. kanchil subruftis


Sinkep




540


470


70


125


113




(


Male


528


450


78


118


108


j}


Linga




500


450


50


119


105


"




Female


500


450


50


118


105



These measurements, which are only a few of those given by Miller, will serve as a standard
in cases when other races are contrasted with the above in the matter of size.



TRAGULID.E 295



II. Genus DORCATHERIUM.

Dorcatherium, Kaup, Oss. Foss. Darmstadt, pt. 5, p. 92, 1836;

B&timeyer, Abh. scliweiz. pal. Ges. vol. x, pt. 2, p. 72, 1883;

Lydekker, Cat. Foss. Mainm. Brit. Mus. pt. ii, p. 153, 1885 ;

Thomas, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1891, p. 385.
Hyemoschus, Gray, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. ser. 1, vol. xvi, p. 350

1845, Cat. Ruminants Brit. Mus. p. 96, 1872.
Hyomoschus, Garrod, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1878, p. 682 ; Flower and

Garson, Cat. Osteol. Mus. B. Coll. Surg. pt. ii, p. 329, 1884.
Hycemoschus, Riitimcyer, Abli. scliweiz. pal. Ges. vol. x, pt. 2, p. 78,

1883.

Size larger than in Tragulus ; main metacarpals and
metatarsals separate, or the latter alone uniting partially or
wholly into a cannon-bone in old age; feet shorter and
stouter with larger lateral toes ; skull relatively short, with
premaxilke not reaching nasals ; dentition : i. , c. j, p. 3^4,
m. | ; tail medium.

Typified by D. naui (Kaup, op. cit. 1836; from the Upper
Tertiary of Eppelsheim, Hesse-Darmstadt, which differs from
the existing species by the presence (at any rate in many
cases) of the first lower premolar.

At the present day the genus is restricted to the equa-
torial forest-zone of Africa.



DOKCATHEKIUM AQUATICUM.

Moschus aquaticus, Ogilby, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1840, p. 35, 1841, p. 68;

Owen, Anat. Vertebrates, vol. ii, p. 487, 1866.
Hyemoschus aquaticus, Gray, Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. ser. 1, vol. xvi,

p. 350, 1845, Knowsley Menagerie, p. 42, pi. xxxi, 1850, Cat.

Ungulata Brit. Mus. p. 248, 1852, Cat. Ruminants Brit. Mus.

p. 99, 1872, Hand-List Ruminants Brit. Mus. p. 169, 1873;

Gerrard, Cat. Bones Mamm. Brit. Mus. p. 269, 1862; Milne-

Edwards, Ann. Sci. Nat., Zool. ser. 5, vol. ii, p. 133, 1864.
Hyomoschus aquaticus, Garrod, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1878, p. 682 ;

Flower and Garson, Cat. Osteol. Mus. R. Coll. Surg. pt. ii, p. 329,

1884 ; Jentink, Notes Leyden Mus. vol. x, p. 26, 1887 ; Pousargues,

Ann. Sci. Nat., Zool. ser. 7, vol. iv, p. 87, 1897.
Hycemoschus aquaticus, Riitimeyer, Abh. schweiz. pal. Ges. vol. x,

pt. 2, p. 78, 1883.
Dorcatherium aquaticum, Thomas, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1891, p. 385 ;

Flower and Lydekker, Study of Mammals, p. 306, 1891 ; Lydekker,

Great and Small Game of Africa, p. 515, 1899, Game Animals

of Africa, p. 386, 1908.



296 CATALOGUE OF UNGULATES

WATER-CHEVEOTAIN.

Typical locality Sierra Leone, West Africa.

The only existing species ; type of Hyemosclius.

Shoulder-height about 13 to 14 inches ; three pairs of
lower premolars ; tail rather bushy ; general colour olive to
chestnut-brown, profusely spotted and striped on the body
with white or yellow, the thick and irregular stripes being
longitudinal and for the most part restricted to the flanks ;
throat and upper part of chest with light and dark markings
comparable with those of Tragulus ; tail white below.

Distribution, at the present day, co-extensive with that
of genus.

The following races have been named :

A. General colour dark olive, with very little

speckling except on neck ; light markings on

back white and distinct D. a. aquaticum.

B. General colour more rufous, heavily speckled all

over upper-parts ; light markings on back straw-
coloured and indistinct.

a. General colour darker rufous, with light mark-

ings extending on to shoulders, and face

with distinct dark chevron D. a. batesi.

b. General colour lighter rufous, with light mark-

ings stopping short of shoulders, and face

without distinct dark chevron D. a. cottoni.

A. Dorcatherium aquaticum aquaticum.

Dorcatherium aquaticum typicum, Lydelclter, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1906,
vol. i, p. 113.

Typical locality Sierra Leone.

General colour dark olive, without any distinct speck-
ling except on neck ; light markings on back white, distinct,
and numerous; face dark in middle line, elsewhere olive-
brown with a tinge of rufous, a distinct white flank-band
running from shoulders along flanks to join transverse loin-
band, and two flank-bands below this ; spots on back forming
distinct and continuous transverse bands ; tail with much
brown above.

44. 8. 22. 1. ) Skin, mounted, and skull, imma-

44. 9. 5. 1 (680, a). I ture female. Sierra Leone ; col-
lected by Mr. J. Whitfield. Presented ly the Earl of Derby, 1844-



TRAGULID^E 297

44. 9. 7. 1. I Skin, mounted, skull, and scapula 1 .

46. 2. 28. 1 (680, 1). ) Same locality and collector. Type.

Same history.

46. 11. 2. 1 (680, d). Skull and limb-bones. Gambia;

same collector. Same history.

46. 11. 2. 3 (680,0). Skull and skin, young. Same

locality and collector. Same history.

46. 11. 19. 10 (680, c). Skeleton, immature. Sierra

Leone ; same collector. Same history.

680, e. Skeleton. Gambia.

Purchased (Zoological Society), 1854.
58. 5. 4. 452 (680,/). Skeleton. Gambia.

Purchased (Zoological Society), 1858.

14. 1. 19. 3. Skin, mounted, and skull, female. Ashanti.

Presented by the Zoological Society, 1914.

13. 11. 21. 16. Body-skin. Mount Barclay, Liberia;

collected by E. H. Bunting, Esq. Purchased, 1913.



B. Dorcatherium aquaticum batesi.

Dorcatherium aquaticum batesi, Lydekker, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1906,
vol. i, p. 113.

Typical locality Cameruns. General colour rufous brown,
heavily speckled all over upper-parts; ligbt markings on
upper surface yellowish and indistinct ; face with a blackish
chevron running from muzzle to eyes ; a distinct yellowish
flank-band joining transverse rump-band ; tail brown at base
with little white at tip.

5. 5. 23. 26. Skull and skin. Efulen, Cameruns ; col-
lected by G. L. Bates, Esq. Type. Purchased, 1905.

6. 4. 4. 1. Skin. Afikpo, Cross Eiver, Southern Nigeria.

Presented by J. C. Cotton, Esq., 1906.

7. 11. 19. 4. Skin (scalp separate). Oban, .40 miles
from Calabar, Southern Nigeria ; collected by P. A. Talbot,
Esq. Presented by Mrs. P. A. Talbot, 1907.

8. 6. 28. 3. Skin. Same locality and collector.

Purchased, 1908.

12. 10. 28. 57. Skull and skin, young female. Same
locality and collector. Purchased, 1912.



298 CATALOGUE OF UNGULATES

12. 10. 28. 74. Skull. Same locality and collector.

. Same history.

14. 2. 20. 1. Body-skin. Little Otomi Bush, Ikon
district, Southern Nigeria, north of Cameruns frontier.

Presented ly N. W. Thomas, Esq., 1914.

C. Doreatherium aquatieum cottoni.

Dorcatherium aquatieum cottoni, Lydekker, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1906,
vol. i, p. 113, Great and Small Game of Africa, p. 387, 1908 ;
Alexander, From Niger to Nile, vol. ii, p. 393, 1907.

Typical locality Ituri Valley.

General colour still more rufous than in last, with light
markings on back and flanks less distinct, less numerous,
and not extending on to shoulders; face without distinct
dark chevron ; flank-band yellowish and almost disappearing
midway between fore and hind limbs, no lateral bands below
it ; tail with much white and apparently more bushy.

6. 6. 2. 3. Skull and skin. Ituri Valley. Type.

Presented by Major P. H. G. Powell-Cotton, 1906.

7. 4. 23. 2. Skin. Ituri Valley.

Presented ly R. S. Reid, Esq., 1907.

7. 7. 8. 229-230. Two skulls and skins. Bima, Welle
Valley ; collected by Capt. G. B. Gosling.

Presented ly Capt. Alexander Gosling, 1907.



SECTION C. TYLOPODA.

In this section three pairs of upper incisors are present in
the young, the outermost of which persists throughout life,
the lower canines are differentiated from the spatulate,
forwardly directed lower incisors, and the anterior pair of
premolars, when present, separated from the other cheek-
teeth, which are tall-crowned and selenodont ; only the two
main toes (3rd and 4th) are developed in each foot, the
terminal segments of which carry nails instead of hoofs, and
have a broad fleshy pad inferiorly. on which the animal walks ;
the rnetacarpals and metatarsals are severally fused into
cannon-bones for the greater part of their length, but their
lower extremities (vol. i, p. 2, fig. 1, c) are divergent and



209

lack the pulley-like ridges and grooves on their articular
surfaces found in the two preceding sections ; in the tarsus
the navicular and cuboid remain distinct. The skull is
devoid of either horns or antlers. The stomach has no distinct
third compartment (maniplies), and the interior of the first
(paunch or rumen) lacks the villi of the Pecora, while both
the first and second chamber are furnished with large cells
in which water can be stored ; the placenta is diffuse, and
the female has either four or two teats. With regard to the
structure of the feet in this group, Pocock remarks that, with
the exception of Oreotragus, all ruminating artiodactyles
" walk upon the cutaneous pad forming the sole and heel of
the hoof, and upon more or less of the inferior edge and apex
of the nail in front. The camels [and llamas] form no
exception to this rule, the only difference being that the
small nail does not invade the area of the sole to anything
like the same extent, and that the sole and the heel are
continued further backwards."

At the present day the group has a remarkably discon-
tinuous distribution, the camels being restricted to the Old
World, and the llamas to South America; in the Tertiary
period it was, however, abundantly represented in North
America, as it also was in Eastern Europe.

FAMILY CAMELID^E.

As this is the only existing family of the section, its

characters may be regarded as the name as those of the latter.

The two existing genera are distinguishable as follows :

A. Size very large, back with one or two fleshy humps, ears

small Camelus.

B. Size much smaller, back without hump, ears larger Lama.

I. Genus CAMELUS.

Camelus, Linn., Syst. Nat. ed. 10, vol. i, p. 65, 1758, ed. 12, vol. i,
p. 90, 1776 ; H. Smith, Griffith's Animal Kingdom, vol. v, p. 297,
1827 ; Gray, Cat. Ruminants Brit. Mus. p. 100, 1872 ; Lydekker,
Cat. Foss. Mamm. Brit. Mus. pt. ii, p. 139, 1885 ; Blanford,
Fauna Brit. India, Mamm. p. 558, 1891 ; Pocock, Proc. Zool.
Soc. 1910, p. 972.



300 CATALOGUE OF UNGULATES

Typical locality probably Arabia.

Size very large, back with one or two large fleshy humps
in median line ; dentition of adult : i. J, c. \, p. f , m. |= 34 ;
anterior premolar placed nearly midway between second
tooth of that series and canine ; lower incisors somewhat
proclivous, with outer pair the largest ; skull elongated, with
overhanging occiput, orbits encircled by bone, and premaxillse
not articulating with arched and rather long nasals; ears
relatively short and rounded; feet broad, with toes imper-
fectly separated ; tail of medium length, tufted ; hair nearly
straight, not woolly ; teats four. No face-glands, but a pair
of occipital glands.

Kestricted at the present day to Asia and Africa, but
known in a wild state only in the neighbourhood of the Gobi
Desert of Central Asia.

The genus is typified by the single-humped Camelus
dromedarius, but as this species is unknown in the wild
state, it does not come within the purview of this Catalogue.

CAMELUS BACTKIANUS.

Camelus bactrianus, Linn., Syst. Nat. ed. 10, vol. i, p. 65, 1758,
ed. 12, vol. i, p. 90, 1766 ; H. Smith, Griffith's Animal Kingdom,
vol. v, p. 297, 1827 ; Hutton, Journ. Asiat. Soc. Bengal, vol. xv,
p. 162, 1846 ; Gray, Cat. Ungulata Brit. Mus. p. 253, 1852, Cat.
Ruminants Brit. Mus. p. 100, 1872, Hand-List Ruminants Brit.
Mus. p. 170, 1873; Radde, Reisen Ost-Siberien, p. 238, 1861;
Gerrard, Cat. Bones Mamm. Brit. Mus. p. 271, 1862 ; Severtzow,
Ann. Mag. Nat. Hist. ser. 4, vol. xviii, p. 170, 1876; Finsch,
Proc. Zool. Soc. 1876, p. 696 ; Przewalski, Petersb. Mitt. Erzb.
vol. xii, p. 17, 1876 ; Blanford, Eastern Persia, vol. ii, p. 97,
1876, Fauna Brit. India, Mamm. p. 558, 1891 ; Flower and
Garson, Cat. Osteol. Mus. R. Coll. Surg. pt. ii, p. 330, 1884;
W. L. Sclater, Cat. Mamm. fnd. Mus. pt. ii, p. 191, 1891 ;
Flower and LydeJcker, Study of Mammals, p. 296, 1891 ; Little-
dale, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1894, p. 446 ; Lesbre, Arch. Mus. Lyon,
vol. viii, p. 1, 1903 ; Pocock, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1910, p. 973.

Typical locality Eastern Europe or Western Asia.

Larger and more clumsily built than the typical species,
with two dorsal humps, a thicker coat, shorter limbs, and
feet more callous and better adapted for hard and rocky
ground.

Camels occur wild in the neighbourhood of the Tarim
Valley and other parts of Chinese Turkestan, but it is



CAMELID.*: 301

probable that the?e are the descendants of domesticated
herds. The same may be the case with some of the wild
camels in the vicinity of Lob Nor and on the fringes of the
Gobi, although it seems quite likely that others like the
horses of the same area may be truly wild.

94. 2. 8. 1. Skin, mounted, of a wild or feral individual.
East of Lob Nor, Chinese Turkestan.

Presented ~by St. George Littledale, Esq., 1894.

II. Genus LAMA.

Lama, Cuvier, Lemons Anat. Comp., Tableau gen. 1800; Desmarest,
Nouv. Diet. Hist. Nat. vol. xxiv, Table, p. 31, 1804; G. Fischer,
Zoognosia, vol. iii, p. 351, 1814 ; Thomas, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1891,
p. 386.

Lacma, Tiedemann, Zoologie, vol. i, p. 428, 1804.

Auchenia, Illiger, Prodr. Syst. Mamm. p. 103, 1811 ; Cuvier, Regne
Animal, vol. i, p. 25, 1817 ; H. Smith, Griffith's Animal Kingdom,
vol. v, p. 298, 1827 ; Flower and Garson, Cat. Osteol. Mus. E. Coll.
Surg. pt. ii, p. 338, 1884 ; nee Thunberg, 1789.

Dromedarius, Wagler, Nat. Syst. Amphib. p. 31, 1830.

Auchenias, Wagner, Wiegmanris Archiv Naturgesch. vol. i, p. 349,
1843.

Llama, Gray, Cat. Ungulata Brit. Mus. p. 254, 1852, Cat. Ruminants
Brit. Mus. p. 10i; 1872.

Neoauchenia, Ameghino, Rev. Argent. Hist. Nat. vol. i, p. 242, 1891.

Size much smaller than in Camelus, and back without
hump ; adult dentition normally : i. ^, c. -]-, p. f , m. f = 32,
but anterior premolars sometimes wanting ; upper premolars
small ; lower incisors long and procumbent, with the outer
pair smallest ; skull with less prominent ridges and relatively
larger brain-chamber than in typical genus, and premaxillae
'articulating with relatively short and broad nasals ; ears
rather long and pointed ; feet narrower, with the toes, each
of which has a distinct plantar pad, more separated than in
Camelus ; tail short ; coat long and woolly ; teats two.

Eestricted at present day to western and southern South
America.

The two species (as represented by wild forms) are
distinguishable as follows :

A. Size larger, callosities on limbs L. glama.

B. Size smaller, no callosities on limbs L. vicugna.



302 CATALOGUE OF UNGULATES



I. LAMA GLAMA.

Camelus glama, Linn. Syst. Nat. ed. 10, vol. i, p. 65, 1758, ed. 12,

vol. i, p. 91, 1766.
Lama glama, Cuvier, Lemons Anat. Comp., Tableau gen. 1800; Thomas,

Proc. Zool. Soc. 1891, p. 387.

Lacma peruana, Tiedemann, Zoologie, vol. i, p. 428, 1804.
Auchenia lama, Illiger, Prodr. Syst. Mamm. p. 103, 1811.
Auchenia glama, H. Smith, Griffith's Animal Kingdom, vol. v, p. 299,

1827.

Camelus lama, Blainville, Osteographie, Camelus, pi. ii.
Llama glama, Gray, Cat. Ungulata Brit. Mus. p. 260, 1852, Cat.

Euminants Brit. Mus. p. 101, 1872, Hand-List Euminants Brit.

Mus. p. 172, 1873.
Neoauchenia glama, Ameghino, Eev. Argent. Hist. Nat. vol. i, p. 242,

1891.

LLAMA (domesticated), GUANACO or HUANACO (wild).

Typical locality Peruvian Andes.

The type species ; first known in Europe by the domesti-
cated llama (L. glama glama), and likewise including the
long-woolled alpaca (L. g. pacos).

As represented by the wild guanaco, the species is dis-
tinguished by its relatively large size (typically about 3 feet
7 inches at shoulder), stout build, long head, darkish fawn-
brown colour, blackish face, and the presence of bare callo-
sities on the limbs.

The two wild races are distinguished as follows :

A. Size larger; basicramal length 11 to llf inches. L. g. huanacus.

B. Size smaller; basicranial length 9f inches L. g. cacsilensis.

A. Lama grlama huanacus.

Camelus huanacus, Molina, Saggio Storia Nat. Chile, vol. i, p. 317,

1782; Gmelin, Linn.'s Syst. Nat. vol. i, p. 170, 1788; H. Smith,

Griffith's Animal Kingdom, vol. iv, p. 55, 1827.
Auchenia huanacus, Illiger, Abh. Ak. Sci. Berlin, 1811, pp. 108

and 111, 1815.*
Auchenia huanaca, H. Smith, Griffith's Animal Kingdom, vol. v,

p. 299, 1827.
Auchenia guanaco, Meyer, Nova Acta Ac. Goes. Leop.-Car. vol. xvi,

p. 552, 1833; Schreber, Sdugthiere, vol. v, pp. 1803 and 1806,

1839.
Auchenia llama, Waterhouse, Zool. Beagle, Mamm. p. 26, 1839,



* Separate copies are stated to have been issued in 1811,



CAMELID.M 303

Auchenia lama, Brandt, Mem. Ac. Sci. St. Petersb. vol. iv, p. 1, 1845 ;
Burmcistcr, Descript. PJiys. Rep. Argent, vol. iii, p. 457, 1879.

Lama guanaco, Gay, Hist. Chile, Zool. vol. i, p. 153, 1847.

Llama guanacus, Gray, Cat. Ungulata Brit. Mus. p. 257, 1852, Cat.

Ruminants Brit. Mus. p. 101, 1872, Hand-List Ruminants Brit.

Mus. p. 171, 1873; Gerrard, Cat. Bones Mamm. Brit. Mus.

p. 272 S 1862.

Llama pacos (fera), Gray, Cat. Ungulata Brit. Mus. p. 260, 1852.

Auchenia huanacus, Flower and Lydekker, Study of Mammals,
p. 300, 1891.

Lama hnanachus, Thomas, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1891, p. 387 ; Lahille,
Ensayo Mam. Repub. Argent, p. 31, 1900 ; Prichard, Proc. Zool.
Soc. 1902, vol. ii, p. 275, Through the Heart o/ Patagonia, p. 253,
1902 ; Scliarff, Origin of Life in America, p. 406, 1911 ; Lonnberg,
Arkiv Zool. vol. viii, no. 19, p. 1, 1913.

Lama huanacos, Sclater, Proc. Zool. Soc. 1891, p. 669.

Lama huanacus, Matscliie, Sdugeth. in Ergebnisse Hamburg. Magal-
Tiaen. Sammclreise, vol. iii, p. 19, 1898 ; Berg, Comun. Mus.
Buenos Aires, vol. i, p. 260, 1900 ; LydekJcer, Great and Small
Game of Europe, etc. p. 375, 1901.

Lama huanacha, Elliot, Cat. Mamm. Field Mus. (Field Mus. Zool.
Pub. vol. viii) p. 36, 1907.

GUANACO or HUANACO ; WILD LLAMA.

Typical locality probably the Chilian Andes, whence the

range extends southwards to Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego.

Size relatively large ; shoulder-height about 3 feet

7 inches ; basal length of skull 11 J to llf inches (291-

295 nim.).

37. 3. 15. 46 (78, &). Skin, mounted. Southern Tierra-
del-Fuego ; collected during the voyage of H.M.S. " Beagle."
Presented ~by Admiral Sir R. Fitzroy, K.C.B., 1837.
674, a. Skeleton, immature. Chile.

Purchased (Zoological Society).

674, /. Skull. From an old skin collected in Patagonia



Online LibraryBritish Museum (Natural History). Dept. of ZoologyCatalogue of the ungulate mammals in the British Museum (Natural History) (Volume 4) → online text (page 24 of 36)