Brooklyn Fairchild sons.

Fairchild cemetery manual a reliable guide to the cemeteries of Greater New York and vicinity online

. (page 19 of 20)
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Hospital.
Borough of Brooklyn — Willoughby and Edward Sts.
Borough of Bronx — Foot of East 120th St.
Borough of Queens — None.
Borough of Richmond — None.



276



FAIRCHILD CEMETERY MANUAL.



H. DuHAMEL & Sons



INCORPORATED



ESTABLISHED 1874



Tops and
Slip

Covers ,,,

Made to h

m



Ordi



er




Painting, Trimming and Altering

Coaches, Landaus, Hearses and
Undertakers' Wagons Made to Order

Repairing in all its Branches
Estimates Furnished Phone 276 Williams

127-137 Wallabout Street,



BROOKLYN, N. Y.



FUNERAL DIRECTORS ASSOCIATIONS
OF THE UNITED STATES.

OFFICERS OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, 1910.

President — George L. Thomas, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
First Vice-president — J. W. Cookerly, Tacoma, Washington.
Second Vice-president — T. H. Reilly, Westboro, Mass.
Third Vice-president — G. C. Paul, Philadelphia, Pa.
Secretary — H. M. Kilpatrick, Elmwood, 111.
Treasurer — Charles A. Miller, Cincinnati, Ohio.
Executive Committee — President and Secretary, ex officio; A.
W. Brown, Grand Rapids, Michigan; J. R. Ragan, Grand
Rapids, Michigan; F. H. Ketcham, Chicago, Illinois.
The twenty-ninth annual Convention of the National Fun-
eral Directors Association of the United States will be held in
the City of Detroit, Michigan, in the month of October, 1910.

OFFICERS OF THE STATE ASSOCIATIONS, 19 10.

Alabama.

President — T. F. Leake, Montgomery.

Secretary — Isham J. Dorsey, Opelika.
Arizona.

President — J. T. Whitney, Phoenix.

Secretary — G. P. Driscoll, Phoenix.
Arkansas.

President — H. I. Holderness, Pine Bluff.

Secretary- — G. R. Overman, Texarkana.
California.

President — F. E. Pierce, Los Angeles.

Secretary — H. W. Maass, San Francisco.
Colorado.

President — E. R. O'Malia, LeadviUe.

Secretary — H. J. Sprinkler, Rocky Ford.

277



278 FAIRCHILD CEMETERY MANUAL.

Funeral Dirccioi's Associatiotis.

Connecticut.

President — James M. Bennett, New Haven.

Secretary — Ernest Ortlepp, Bridgeport.
Florida.

President — C. M. Bingliam, Daytona.

Secretary — F. L. Miller, Sanford.
Georgia.

President — E. F. Bond, Atlanta.

Secretary — S. C. Kytle, Carrollton.
Idaho.

President — N. C. Haitt, Boise.

Secretary — A. H. Lendquist, Pocatello.
Illinois.

President — M. M. Goodale, Chicago.

Secretary — H. M. Kilpatrick, Elmwood.
Indiana.

President — J. D. Emmons, Columbus.

Secretary — W. A. Ruston, Plainfield.
Iowa.

President — F. L. Daggett, OttuniAva.

Secretary — Charles Emerson, Creston.
Kansas.

President — C. H. McDuflBe, Waverly.

Secretary — L. M. Penwell, Topeka.
Kentucky.

President — John Allison, Covington.

Secretary — C. E. Cunningham, Bellevue.
Maine.

President — F. B. Wood, Hallowell.

Secretary — A. S. Plummcr, Auburn.
Massachusetts.

President — J. P. Cleary, Roxbury.

Secretary — E. L. Derby, Cambridge.
Michigan.

Puesident^ — E. L. Hughes, Traverse City.

Secretary — J. B. Mclnncs, Grand Rapids.
Minnesota.

President — M. J. Filiatrault, Duluth.

Secretary — Thomas Davidson, Maukato.



FAIRCHILD CEMETERY MANUAL. 279

Funeral Directors Associations.

Mississippi.

President — T. E. Taylor^ Jackson.

Secretary — W. I. Wilder, Gulfport.
Missouri.

President — Thomas O'Donnell, Hannibal.

Secretary — C. A. Schoene, Milan.
Montana.

President — J. S. Cook, Belt.

Secretary — Thomas Sullivan, Anaconda.
Nebraska.

President — O. L. Schumann, Fairbury.

Secretary — P. B. Skinner, Neligh.
Nevada.

President — T. F. Dunn, Goldfield.

Secretary — J. B. Kenny, Virginia.
New Hampshire.

President — Charles D. Fox, Milton Falls.

Secretary — J. M. Lamb, Hinsdale.
New Jersey.

President — G. H. Bunnell, Jersej^ City.

Secretary — W. B. Thompson, Atlantic City.
New Mexico.

President — J. A. Mahoney, Demig.

Secretary — H. C. Strong, Las Cruces.
New York.

President — G. E. Fairchild, Syracuse.

Secretary — G. L. Gilham, New York City.
North Carolina.

President — E. G. Flanagan, Greenville.

Secretary — F. P. Brovrn, Raleigh.
North Dakota.

President — W. M. Chandler, Grafton.

Secretary — S. H. Ashley, Grand Forks.
Ohio.

President — Joseph Gilligan, Cincinnati.

Secretary— F. M. Barnhart, Findlay.
Oklahoma.

President — D. H. Buffington, Sapula.

Secretary — A. E. Bracken, Kingfisher.



280



Fumral Directors Associatioiiii.



FAIRCHILD CEMETERY MANUAL.



SLATE GRAVE VAULTS

Slate IS taken out of the earth. Vaults are placed in the earth.
Is it not reasonable that Slate Vaults will last the longest.

Plain vaults are
held together by
the surrounding
earth.
Easily set up.

Plain \ ault

Grooved and Bolted Vaults are held se-
curely by an iron rod through each end, a Grooved and Bolted Vault
little cement hermetically seals them.

PITTSBURG SLATE COMPANY

BANGOR, PA.





Oregon.

PuESIDENT—

Sechetahy-
Pennsylvania.

Phksidext-

Sechetary-
Rhode Island.

Phesident-

SeC UK r.\HY-

South Carolina.
Phesiuext-
Sechetary-

South Dakota.

I'jlESinENT-

Secretary-
Tennessee.

Phesident-
Secretaky-



-W. T. Gordon, Eugene.
-A. L. rinley, Portland.

-II. F. Mooney, Wilkcsbarrc.
-G. C. Paul, Philadelphia.

-F. M. Wlii))ple, Pascoag.
y. J. McAloon, Pawtucket.

-T. J. McCarthy, ("harloston.
-J. P. Mackey, Greenville.

-C. T. Liddlc, Iroquois.
-L. J. Shaw, Watertown.

-William Martin. Xa.shville.
W. S. Cook, Bolivar.



FAIRCHILD CEMETERY MANUAL. 281

Funeral Directors Associations.

Texas.

Prjesident — W. B. Carson, Pilot Point.

Secretary— C. E. Smith, Dallas.
Vermont.

President — C. H. Hayden, Riverside.

Secretary — A. E. Hale, Bradford.
Virginia.

President — W. J. Morrisett, Manchester.

Secretary — L. T. Cristian, Richmond.
Washington.

President — George McMartin, Walla Walla.

Secretary — E. S. Hennessey, Walla Walla.
Washington, D. C.

President — G. P. Zurhorst, Washington.

Secretary — J. R. Wright, Washington.
West Virginia.

President — L. E. Kramer, Ronceverti.

Secretary — C. L. Musgrave, Fairmomit.
Wisconsin.

President^ — B. M. Hoppenyan, Ashland.

Secretary — T. F. Fleming, Eau Claire.

EMBALMING EXAMINERS.

New York State Board of Registration.

President — Cornelius T. Burns, Troy.

Secretary — W. J. Phillips, Albany.
New Jersey State Board of Registration.

President^ — W. Nelson Knapp, East Orange.

Secretary — J. F. Martin, Elizabeth.
Connecticut State Board of Registration.

President — Arthur R. Leete, Thompsonville.

Secretary — E. P. Jones, Winsted.
Massachusetts State Board of Registration.

Chairman- — Thomas H. Reilley, Westboro.

Secretary — F. L. Briggs, Boston.



282



FAIRCHILD CEMETERY MANUAL.



Nature's Own Method



By H. S. ECKELS



NA IT'RF. never makes a mistake. Her laws
are absolute and their workings inexor-
able. Omniscience has provided against
all contingencies and whatever of progress man
has made has been by applying, and not
altering, these eternally fixed laws. The
more nearly, therefore, we have been able to
approach Nature's methods, the more abso-
lutely scientific our work has been. Until very
recent times men believed that Nature and
Science were at variance, but this feeling was
born only of our lack of perception or conception
of Nature's processes. The first step that the
funeral director took towards placing his profes-
sion upon a scientific basis was when he realized
that arterial embalming was the best, and I
may say the only, method of permanently pre-
serving the dead human body. When he began
to realize that the embalming fiiiids after death,
to secure proper distribution, must follow ab-
solutely the course taken by the blood while
life existed, the first step was taken. He was
at least appro.iching Nature's own methods,
and since Nature's way must be the best, the
nearer he got to it the greater was the certainty
of his success.

.Arterial embalming, like most other scientific
processess, has passed through a number of
successively improving eras. One by one, the
arteries have been picked up and their capa-
bilities tested. 1 have done much of this re-
search work myself, and in the thousands of
bodies that have passed under my hands have
met almost every possible conceivable obstacle
that an undertaker would encounter.

The net result of this experience has been
that in ninety-nine cases out of a hundred I
now am using the axillary artery in preference
to the carotid, the brachial, the radial, the
iliac, or the femoral. With instniments de-
signed for the purpose I have found that
through the axillary artery it is possible to in-
ject the fluid directly into the arch of the aorta,
the beginning of the systemic circulation in life,
thus absolutely taking Nature's own method.
At the same time I drain blood by way of the
axillary vein, which is picked up through the
same incision, directly from the superior vena
cava, the great blood reservoir of the upper
portions of the body and the receptacle into
which Nature empties all of the veins which
Ic.td from those portions of the body which it is
desirable to beautify for funeral purposes, i. e..
the face and the hands.

The superiority of the axillary over the
brachial and the other arteries empfoye


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Online LibraryBrooklyn Fairchild sonsFairchild cemetery manual a reliable guide to the cemeteries of Greater New York and vicinity → online text (page 19 of 20)