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Calif.) Daughters of the American Revolution. Sequoia chap.

Ceremonies at the planting of the liberty tree in Golden Gate Park by Sequoia chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution. April 19, 1894, the one hundred and nineteenth anniversary of the Battle of Lexington online

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Online LibraryCalif.) Daughters of the American Revolution. Sequoia chapCeremonies at the planting of the liberty tree in Golden Gate Park by Sequoia chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution. April 19, 1894, the one hundred and nineteenth anniversary of the Battle of Lexington → online text (page 3 of 4)
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The Rector, the Rev. Dr. Duche, was chaplain of the first Continental Congress,
and his successor in the rectorship, Bishop White, was also chaplain of Congress.
Continental Congress, in a body, met in the church for a service of fasting and
prayer, before the Declaration of Independence; and all the distinguished
men of that historic time worshipped here on occasion, as also the men of the
Constitutional Convention of 1787, which gave the nation its present Constitution.
Many of these men wer members of the Episcopal Church ; but on account of
the patriotic position of Christ Church men of other religious bodies attended
from time to time during this period. Francis Hopkinson, Secretary of Congress,
was a member of the Vestry, a corporation of the church ; Robert Morris, Treasurer
of the Revolution, was a regular parishioner, and lies buried under the shadow of
the church; Benjamin Franklin was a pew-holder, for six years a member of the
Vestry, and a leader in the movement which erected the present spire. His
lineal descendant and representative is at the present time a member of our
Vestry, and, as you know, the tomb of Franklin, which next to the tomb of
Washington at Mount Vernon is the most interesting tomb in our country, is
in our churchyard. I send you dust from beside that grave.

Betty Ross, who made the first American Flag, was a parishioner of Christ
Church. Her house, where the flag was made, is within a few yards of the
church, and her pew in the church is kept decorated with a flag placed there by a
member of the Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution.

In our churchyard are buried many officers of the Revolutionary Army the
remains of Major-General Lee lying beside one of the church doors. In this
church the American Episcopal Church was organized after the Revolution ;
here its present Constitution was adopted, and here also the Prayer-Book was
adopted. Here lies buried the famous Bishop White, the friend and pastor of
Washington. Prominent military and naval officers of the War of 1812 were
connected with Christ Church, and in the churchyard are buried General
Thomas Cadwalader, Commodore Bainbridge, Biddle, Truxton, and Richard
Dale. Soldiers of the Rebellion lie in the same historic spot. In Christ Church
Lafayette worshipped on his second visit to America, and persons are still living
who remember the event. Here also Henry Clay commonly worshipped when in
Philadelphia, and the church has been visited by almost all the distinguished
men in the recent history of the country, on account of its unique position,
which ranks it with Independence Hall here, and Faneuil Hall, Boston, as one
of the great historic sites of our land.

Here are noted current historical events by the ringing of the bells a custom



CONTRIBUTIONS. 29

kept up from before the Revolutionary War. In accordance with this custom
were rung a peal on the first Fourth of July immediately after the old bell at
Independence Hall, close by, rang the Declaration of Independence. The crowd
came from the hall to Christ Church that day to hear the peal ring in
Independence. When the British army occupied the city, Continental Congress,
to save these bells, had them taken down and carried with the Liberty Bell to
Allentown, Pa. After the evacuation, they were re-hung at the expense of the
Continental Congress. Longfellow has immortalized them in the closing scene
of his " Evangeline."

You will not wonder that it is usually in "Old Christ Church" that the
patriotic services of this old Capital of the nation, Philadelphia, are held, on
the occasions of the assemblage for worship of the God of our fathers, by the
Societies of the Cincinnati, Sons of the Revolution, Colonial Wars, and Colonial
Dames. Yours sincerely,

C. ELLIS STEVENS,

Sector of Christ Church.

Soil from grave of General George Rogers Clark in Cave
Hill Cemetery, Louisville, Ky. A distinguished officer
of the Revolution.

Contributed by MRS. FANNY THURSTON BALLARD, Hon-
orary Regent D. A. R. for Kentucky.

Acorns from the oak trees overhanging the rocks (Oratory
Rock) on the spot where Mary Washington was accus-
tomed to spend a portion of each day in prayer for the
safety of her beloved son, who was perilling his life for
his country.

Contributed by MRS. MARGARET HETZEL, Clifton Station,
Va., Secretary of the Mary Washington Memorial Association.

Earth from grave of Captain and brevet Major John Phelan,
a distinguished officer of the Massachusetts Line, Conti-
nental Army from 1777 to 1781. Member of the Order of
the Cincinnati. Died in Baltimore in 1827. Remains
removed from Friends' Burying-Ground to Greenmount
Cemetery, 1852.

Contributed by his grandniece, MRS. REGINA M. KNOTT,
Baltimore, Md.

Earth and ivy-vine from grave of Charles Carroll of Carroll-
ton, the last survivor of the Signers of the Declaration of
Independence, whose remains lie in the Catholic Chapel
at Donghoregan Manor, the family estate.

Contributed by his great-grandson, MR. HARPER CARROLL,
of Carrollton.



30 PLANTING OF THE LIBERTY TREE.

Soil from grave of Major Jonathan Nowell in North Ber-
wick, Me., a Revolutionary Captain in the 7th Continen-
tal Infantry, Massachusetts, and who served on the Board
of Selectmen of the town of Berwick, Me., 1771-72-76.
Also from grave of Thomas Hobbs, Jr., North Berwick,
Me., who was at the first battle of Ticonderoga, about
1757 ; serving also as a Selectman of Berwick, 1771-72-
76-77.

Contributed by their great-granddaughters, MRS. CHARLES
FERNALD, Santa Barbara, Cal., and MRS. N. W. BLANCHARD,
Santa Paula, Cal., members of Sequoia Chapter D. A. R.

Soil from grave of General Ichabod Goodwin, South Ber-
wick, Me., who was elected delegate to the Provincial
Congress, May 29, 1775, afterwards a Major-General in
the Provincial Army.

Contributed by his great-grandnieces, MRS. CHARLES FER-
NALD and MRS. N. W. BLANCHARD.

Soil from the grave in Old Town, Md., of her great-great-
great-grandfather, Colonel Thomas Cresap, who was bom
at Skipton, Yorkshire, Eng., in 1683, and died at Old
Town, Md., in 1789. He was a pioneer soldier, surveyor,
school trustee and burgess, famous for his bold, adven-
turous disposition in dangerous border life, being endowed
with the highest courage and fortitude. His name was
a household word with the whites and Indians, who
called him "Big Spoon," on account of his great hos-
pitality. At that time his stronghold at Old Town, Md.,
Fort Skipton, was the only place of refuge for settlers in
all that part of the then frontier. He was an able officer
in General Braddock's army, and later an active supporter
of the Revolution, giving largely of his great wealth and
sending his sons to fight for the cause of freedom.

Soil from the grave at Old Town, Md., of her grandfather
Lieutenant-Colonel Daniel Cresap, who was born 1753,
and died December 3, 1794. He was a Lieutenant in his
uncle's (Captain Michael Cresap) battalion of riflemen,
and marched to Boston to join General Washington in
1775. He commanded the Militia of Alleghany County,
Md., was Lieutenant-Colonel commanding a regiment in



CONTRIBUTIONS. 31

General Lee's Army against the " Whiskey Rebellion,"
and served with distinction throughout the War of the
Revolution.

Soil from the grave in Trinity Churchyard, New York, of
Captain Michael Cresap, son of Colonel Thomas Cresap;
born June 29, 1742, died October 18, 1775. He was the
first settler on the Ohio, in Kentucky ; built " Red Stone
Old Fort," where Brownsville stands, for many years
a stronghold of safety for settlers. He was Captain of a
rifle company in the Continental Army before Boston,
and served as a Captain under command of Lord Dun-
more in an expedition against the Indians, in which he
eminently distinguished himself. He was buried with
military honors in Trinity Churchyard, New York.

Contributed by MRS. GEORGIAN A C. ORD HOLLADAY, first
Vice-Regent of Sequoia Chapter D. A. R. of San Francisco.

Earth from the grave of General Daniel Morgan, in the
Presbyterian graveyard at Winchester, Va., who died
July 6, 1802, in the 67th year of his age. The military
history of this brave commander of the celebrated rifle
corps is well known. He was called the " Thunderbolt
of War," this brave Morgan, who never knew fear.

Contributed by Miss MILDRED O. MATHES, Dolly Madison
Chapter, No. 2, Memphis, Tenn.

Earth from Wyoming Battle-field and Monument.

Contributed by MRS. CLARA RANDLE SPEERS, Dolly Madi-
son Chapter, No. 2, Memphis, Tenn.

Earth from the grave of Lieutenant-Colonel Peleg Slade,
Swansea, Mass.

Contributed by his great-grandson, WILLIAM SEWARD
FRANKLIN, San Francisco, Cal.



The silver trowel used in depositing the earth was
presented by Mrs. NATHAN W. BLANCHARD, of Santa Paula,
Cal. The handle is of wood from the branch of a tree at
Mount Vernon, planted during Washington's time.



32 PLANTING OF THE LIBERTY TREE.



SONG OF THE LIBERTY TREE.

Dolly Madison Chapter, No. 2, D, A. R., of Memphis, Tenn., to Sequoia
Chapter, of San JFrancisco, Cal., Greeting:



See the flaunting flags and pennants
In the toying winds released;

See the people crowding, crowding
From the North and South and East

From the nation's mighty highways,
As to fete or nuptial feast!



For, beside the foam-flecked billows
Where the Western gates unfold,

Swinging wide that there may enter
All the sunlight's slanted gold

In this wonderland of Promise
Lo, a carnival we hold!

Carnival of peace perpetual,
Love's triumphant jubilee;

And as pledge to unborn cycles
Deep we plant this slender tree,

Consecrating leaves and branches
With the legend " Liberty."

Count thyself, O proud Sequoia!

Blessed above the forest vast,
For we give safe in thy keeping

All the record of the past,
Of the days when England trembled

At the patriots' trumpet blast.



For although thy stem is reaching
Upward in the azure glow,

And thy arms point down the future
Where the star-eyed blossoms blow,

Deep thy roots strike in the ashes
Of the storied Long Ago.

Ashes of the old-time splendor
When our fathers conquered Might;

Dust of heroes brave who perished
Nobly striving for the right,

Gathered from far fields of battle
Where the war star glittered bright.



SONG OF THE LIBERTY TREE. 33

Gathered that Columbia's daughter

Born beside the Western sea,
Might have share in all our glory

As she shares our loyalty,
And in soil by heroes hallowed

Set her sign of fealty.



Round thee, O thou forest giant !

Brooding memories ever throng ;
Martial echoes haunt thy branches

With an unforgotten song
Drawn up through the golden sunlight

From the dust that slumbered long.

For each clod that feeds thy fibers
As thou climbest to the sun

Holds its story of a struggle
When the Nation's life begun.

List, O world, and hear the branches
Sing the deeds of valor done!



Faint at first, like prelude swelling
From the tree's green ambuscade,

Sweeping grandly from the old days
Comes the furious fusillade,

When on Lexington's broad common
Was unsheathed the first red blade.



Songs of Trenton and of Princeton
Other limbs are chanting shrill;

Rapturous roar from Saratoga
Which nor time nor space can still

Blend with requiems for the fallen
Stricken low on Bunker Hill.



Here, a bough is telling over

How McDowell's gallant line,
With a fortitude unfailing,

Climbed King's Mountain's steep incline;
There, another whispers alway

Of historic Brandywine.



Hark! from that green twig that dances

High up in the glinting sun
Marion's bugle-horn is winding

O'er the fields his valor won;
While from yon branch, downward drooping,

Booms Moll Pitcher's trusty gun.



34 PLANTING OF THE LIBERTY TREE.

Higher yet a bough is reaching
Like a banner brave and bright,

Tossing all its glancing tendrils
In the sea of crystal light,

Chanting Yorktown's crowning triumph
With a cry of glad delight.



Oh, each branch has caught its story
From the dust its roots among,

And aroused by wind-blown kisses
All the tree wakes into song,

Shouting psalms to Peace and Freedom,
Which the flying winds prolong.



And the anthem upward swelling
Seems like twilight hymn of rest

To the love-birds who have builded
On the topmost bough their nest

Coo of doves half drown the war-cries
On the slender, swaying crest.



O ye boughs that hold in keeping
Fame of many a hard-fought fray !

Ye shall lift the story upward
Till the stars their homage pay

Drooping low their golden torches
Where the darkness meets the day.



Tree of Liberty thus planted

In the soil where patriots trod,
Thou shalt blossom through the ages,

Like the prophet's wondrous rod:
As a covenant majestic

Stand thou twixt our souls and God!

SARA BEAUMONT KENNEDY.
Memphis, Tenn.



[TRANSLATION.]



J. OLLIVIER BEAUREGARD

Successeur de M. J. Marechal

101 Rue de Lille



PARIS, January 8, 1894.

I, undersigned, Mandatory of the Pro-
prietors of the Oratory of Picpus and of
the Cemetery of Picpus, hereby authorize
Mr. Paul Desormeaux, Surveyor-General of
the Cemeteries of the City of Paris, to take
from the tomb of General Lafayette the
quantity of earth which he will deem
necessary to be forwarded to San Fran-
cisco, to the Society of the Daughters of
the American Revolution, for the purpose
of planting therein a Liberty Tree, con-
secrated to the heroes of the American
Revolution.

The Guardian of the Cemetery is here-
by authorized to allow the taking and
removal of the said earth.

[SIGNED] J. 0. BEAUREGARD.



[TRANSLATION.]

R^publique Frangaise
Libert^ Egalite" Fraternite

Prefecture du De"partement de la Seine

Direction des Affaires Municipales

2 e Division 2 e Bureau



This twentieth day of January, one thousand
eight hundred and ninety-four, at ten o'clock
A. M., at the Cemetery of Picpus, Picpus street,
No. 35, Paris, with the authorization of Mr. Beau-
regard, Mandatory of the Proprietors of the
Cemetery of Picpus; in the presence of Mr. de
Corcelles, representing the family of General de
Lafayette, and under the direction of Mr. Paul
Desormeaux, Surveyor-General of the Cemeteries
of the City of Paris, delegated to that effect by
the Prefect of the Department of the Seine, there
was taken from the sepulchre of General de
Lafayette a quantity of earth, which was placed
in a metallic casket ; the same was there and
then closed and sealed with the seal of the City
of Paris. The casket was then placed in a wood-
en box, to be forwarded to the Consul of France
at San Francisco, under the care of the Minister
of the Interior.

In witness thereof have signed :

[SIGNED] CORCELLES, DESORMEAUX.



PLANTING OF THE LIBERTY TREE. 37



PLANTING THE LIBERTY TREE.

BY HELEN SATTEBLEE FRENCH.

As when, adown some lofty glittering height,
Jeweled with glaciers, the rushing rills

In sunlit shade or softly shadowed light
Blend in one stream that all the mighty chasm fills
While virgin forests ring and trembling echo thrills

Sprung from one fountain, nourished at one heart,

Leaping, as children at one mother's side,
Until some granite island cleaves apart

The noble stream whose foaming waves divide,

Forgetful of the ties that once allied

With angry babbling, and with ominous roar,
Fated to follow down the earth's resistless trend,

Predestined, after the mad strife is o'er,
In sacred Union never more to end
Again in one vast glorious surge to blend

So fared our Nation. Thus came Cavalier,

Exile, and stalwart Puritan, each urged
On by a mighty impulse, dominant, sincere.

Diverse in custom, lineage, and creed, they merged

All in one bloody baptism, while surged

Red waves of war, billows of patriot blood,
Until, victorious o'er the Tyrant's hireling horde,

Those billows overwhelmed them as a flood,
While conquering heroes, sheathing the triumphant sword,
"Glory unto the Lord of Hosts," proclaimed with one accord.

Thus, ere the century had grown ripe and old,
One frowning Rock arose and barred the way.

Oh! let not here that history be told,
How fierce the struggle, deadly the affray
Alas! that haunting dream ! that mournful day!

A mightier Will than will of mortal man,

A Voice, whom angry seas of old obeyed,
Spake, " Peace ! Ye dare not thwart the Eternal Plan,"

And, on that barrier His Rod He laid;

It sank from sight ; the stream one channel made.

And while we now stand by the Occident Shore,
Warm in every vein, tumultuously thrilling,

Runs the patriot blood of our sires of yore,
While we ponder the lesson they died instilling



290969



38 PLANTING OF THE LIBERTY TREE.

We raise here no altar to human pride,
We pour out the wine of no vain oblation;

While we chant the glory of those who died
Let us live our lives for the Life of the Nation

While in names of our fathers we firmly stand
For laws that to all yield a swift redress

Guard our children's rights from an alien band
Grant a purer People a purer Press



Then what shall we plant for our Liberty Tree?
Oh ! say what our symbol of Freedom shall be !
Shall Southern Palmetto or Pine of the North
Bear our Standard of Liberty now and henceforth f

Let its roots lie deep in the mountain's breast;
It must tower like a monarch above the rest ;
Till it counts its cycles where men count years ;
It must stand till the Prince of Peace appears.

The Palmetto quivers and droops her head ;
The Pine-Tree shivers and stands as dead ;
Thou alone, finite type of infinity,
Sequoia, we hail Thee our Liberty Tree

You have heard how they cast our Liberty Bell
And the Nation murmured, 'Tis well! 'tis well !
Let them give of their best, both of silver and gold,
As they gave in Colonial Days of Old.

But a nobler type is this living Tree,
For a growing thing should our emblem be
That incorporates into its tissue and food
All grosser things and makes them good.

And, lifting them up to a higher plane

Adds a sweeter note to the grand refrain.

In thy branches shelter the nesting-birds

While the winds sing ever their songs without words.

We welcome the lesson, dear Country of ours,
That, from Nature's decay spring her loveliest flowers,
And, though lowly and ignorant, poor and oppressed,
We fear not earth's millions that seek here for rest.

Let their strong life thrill in thy branch and leaf ;
Lift them up from bondage, and shame, and grief;
In thy nobler part, they shall share at length,
And gratefully yield thee their cruder strength.

O Liberty Tree ! was Thy Day foretold

By the Seer of Patmos in days of old ?

Are Thy healing leaves for the earth's deep grief?

Is Thy balm distilled for a world's relief?



PLANTING OP THE LIBERTY TREE. 39

Then rise, Sequoia ! from low estate,

Till you look on the Ocean, the Golden Gate !

For never grew Tree so grandly fed

From the mingled dust of a Nation's Dead !



Then come to the Planting ! Shall we bid you in vain T
Bring the sacred dust that you guard in your border !

From Plymouth, or Richmond, Savannah, or Maine.
Sequoia shall stand here henceforward as warder.

O Lexington ! spare but a handful of earth

From that sacred field of song and story
When re-incarnated Freedom found birth

And the Page of our History glows with glory.

Was it true? that weird legend a Hawthorne told

On that April Morning so long ago ?
How a Champion Gray in quaint dress of old

From his cerements rose to confront the foe

As he faced the Andros long before,

Till the craven shrunk appalled away ?
That at Freedom's call he will walk once more ?

Then welcome ! O Champion ! Rise to-day ! !

And you, O Monseigneur ! most honored guest !

Consul of France, whose presence crowns our day !
Take not our words alone, but what is unexpressed

Lest language fail our feeling to convey

Tell her oh ! tell the Land of Lafayette,

We send her greeting from our sunset sea ;
Tell her Columbia never can forget

Her priceless gift, her ancient sympathy.

Tell her oh ! tell the Land of Lafayette

This precious dust we deem a holy thing,
And that, perchance, around it lingers yet

Some sacred spark, some influence doth cling.

Then, should a later age unworthy grow.
Let danger threaten or should friends forsake,

Again, in hour of peril meet our foe,
O precious dust of Lafayette ! awake !

Until, beside the Nation's eastern porch

Where stands Bartholdi's Statue, cherished gift of France,
Shall flame triumphant, Freedom's deathless torch,

Lighting the stately progress of the World's Advance! !



SACRED TO THE LIBERTY AND THE RIGHTS OF MANKIND!!!

THE FREEDOM AND INDEPENDENCE OF AMERICA,
SEALED AND DEFENDED WITH THE BLOOD OF HER SONS.

THIS MONUMENT is ERECTED

BY THE INHABITANTS OF LEXINGTON,

UNDER THE PATRONAGE AND AT THE EXPENSE OF

THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS,

TO THE MEMORY OF THEIR FELLOW CITIZENS,

ENSIGN ROBERT MONROE, AND MESSRS. JONAS PARKER,

SAMUEL HADLEY, JONATHAN HARRINGTON, JUNR.,
ISAAC MUZZY, CALEB HARRINGTON, AND JOHN BROWN,

OF LEXINGTON, AND ASAHEL PORTER, OF WOBURN,

WHO FELL ON THIS FIELD, THE FIRST VICTIMS TO THE

SWORD OF BRITISH TYRANNY AND OPPRESSION,

ON THE MORNING OF THE EVER MEMORABLE

NINETEENTH OF APRIL, AN. DOM. 1775.

THE DIE WAS CAST ! ! !

THE BLOOD OF THESE MARTYRS

IN THE CAUSE OF GOD AND THEIR COUNTRY

WAS THE CEMENT OF THE UNION OF THE STATES, THEN

COLONIES, AND GAVE THE SPRING TO THE SPIRIT, FIRMNESS,

AND RESOLUTION OF THEIR FELLOW CITIZENS.

THEY ROSE AS ONE MAN TO REVENGE THEIR BRETHREN'S

BLOOD, AND AT THE POINT OF THE SWORD TO ASSERT AND

DEFEND THEIR NATIVE RIGHTS.

THEY NOBLY DARED TO BE FREE ! !

THE CONTEST WAS LONG, BLOODY, AND AFFECTING.
RIGHTEOUS HEAVEN APPROVED THE SOLEMN APPEAL;

VICTORY CROWNED THEIR ARMS; AND

THE PEACE, LIBERTY, AND INDEPENDENCE OF THE UNITED

STATES OF AMERICA WAS THEIR GLORIOUS REWARD.

INSCRIPTION ON THE LEXINGTON MONUMENT.




3 I

X H

o 3



HERE

ON THE 19 OP APRIL
1775

WAS MADE

THE FIRST FORCIBLE RESISTANCE

TO BRITISH AGGRESSION.

ON THE OPPOSITE BANK

STOOD THE AMERICAN MILITIA.

HERE STOOD THE INVADING ARMY,

AND ON THIS SPOT

THE FlRST OF THE ENEMY FELL,

IN THE WAR OF THAT REVOLUTION

WHICH GAVE

INDEPENDENCE

TO THESE UNITED STATES.

IN GRATITUDE TO GOD,

AND

IN THE LOVE OF FREEDOM,

THIS MONUMENT

WAS ERECTED

A. D. 1836.



INSCRIPTION ON THE OLD MONUMENT AT THK
NORTH BRIDGE, CONCORD.



-

<Sr & THE TOWN OF ACTON ^

CO-OPEBATING TO PERPETUATE THE FAME
OF GLORIOUS DEEDS OF PATRIOTISM HAVE
ERECTED THIS MONUMENT IN HONOR OF

CAPT. ISAAC DAVIS

& PRIVATES ABNER HOSMER & JAMES HAYWARD

CITIZEN SOLDIERS OF ACTON & PROVINCIAL MINUTE

MEN WHO FELL IN CONCORD FIGHT THE 19ra OF APRIL

A. D. 1775

ON THE MORNING OF THAT EVENTFUL DAY
THE PROVINCIAL OFFICERS HELD A COUNCIL OF

WAR NEAR THE OLD NORTH BRIDGE IN
CONCORD & AS THEY SEPARATED DAVIS EXCLAIMED

" I HAVE N'T A MAN THAT IS AFRAID TO GO "

& IMMEDIATELY MARCHED HIS COMPANY FROM THE

LEFT TO THE RIGHT OF THE LINE & LED IN THIS

FIRST ORGANIZED ATTACK UPON THE

TROOPS OF GEORGE III. IN THAT MEMORABLE WAR

WHICH BY THE HELP OF GOD MADE THE

THIRTEEN COLONIES INDEPENDENT OF GREAT

BRITAIN & GAVE POLITICAL BEING TO THE

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

ACTON AP. 19TH 1851



INSCBIPTION ON THE ACTON MONUMENT.




ACTON MOXl'MKNT.

To THE MEMORY OF CAPT. ISAAC DAVIS AND PRIVATES ABNER HOSMER^ AND JAMES HAYWARD,
WHO FELL IN CONCORD FIGHT, APRIL 19, 1775.



Sequoia Chapter



OF SAN FRANCISCO



of tfee Hmerican "Revolution




December 10, 1801



MRS. HENRY MCLEAN MARTIN MRS. LELAND STANFORD

Honorary Regent Honorary Regent

MRS. A. S. HUBBARD

State Regent



Officers of Sequoia Cbapter

Appointed December 10, 1891.



MARY E. ALVORD, Regent

GEORGIANA C. ORD HOLLADAY, Vice-Regent

L. E. A. HORSBURGH, .... Corresponding Secretary
MATTIE SPOTTS BLAKEMAN, .... Recording Secretary

FANNY M. SMEDBERG, Treasurer

S. ISABELLE HUBBARD, Registrar

MARY LYNDE HOFFMAN, -. . Historian



3Boar& ot /iDanaaement

MARY E. ALVORD, MART L. HOFFMAN,

GEORGUANA C. O. HOLLADAY, HELEN SATTERLEE FRENCH,

L. E. A. HORSBURQH, LEONTINE SPOTTS KEENEY,

MATTIE S. BLAKEMAN, ELLEN M. COLTON,

FANNY M. SMEDBERO, MARION SATTERLEE THOMPSON,

S. ISABELLE HUBBARD, EMILY SAWYER MOORE,
HELEN C. THORNTON.



fffcers of Sequoia Cbapter

Elected October 11, 1892.



MARY E. ALVORD, Regent

GEORGIANA C. ORD HOLLADAY, Vice-Regent

L. E. A. HORSBURGH, !.'.. Corresponding Secretary

ALMA PRISCILLA ALDEN, Recording Secretary

MATTIE SPOTTS BLAKEMAN, . Treasurer

S. ISABELLE HUBBARD, Registrar

MARY LYNDE CRAIG, Historian

CORNELIA ARMSTEAD CRUX, Delegate to Continental Congress


1 3

Online LibraryCalif.) Daughters of the American Revolution. Sequoia chapCeremonies at the planting of the liberty tree in Golden Gate Park by Sequoia chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution. April 19, 1894, the one hundred and nineteenth anniversary of the Battle of Lexington → online text (page 3 of 4)
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