Charles Darwin.

What Mr. Darwin saw in his voyage round the world in the ship Beagle. online

. (page 1 of 11)
Online LibraryCharles DarwinWhat Mr. Darwin saw in his voyage round the world in the ship Beagle. → online text (page 1 of 11)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


UC-NRLF








THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY
OF CALIFORNIA

PRESENTED BY

PROF. CHARLES A. KOFOID AND
MRS. PRUDENCE W. KOFOID




CHARLES DARWIN.



WHAT



MR. DARWIN



SAW



IN HIS YOYAGE ROUND THE WORLD
IN THE SHIP "BEAGLE"




THE " BEAGLE " LAID ASHORE AT THE MOUTH OF THE SANTA CRUZ



NEW YORK

HARPER & BROTHERS, PUBLISHERS

FRANKLIN SQUARE

1880



Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1879, by

HARPER & BROTHERS,
In the Office of the Librarian of Congress, at Washington.



\\



ft)

rtat Name of

Hattoin



WHAT MR. DARWIN SAW IN HIS VOYAGE

ROUND THE WORLD IN THE

SHIP "BEAGLE"



FOR PARENTS.



design of this book can be stated in a few words,
namely, to interest children in the study of natural his-
tory, and of physical and political geography.

I. It would be hard to find a child indifferent to stories
about animals. The number of books, both systematic and
unsystematic, to which this fact has given rise is very large ;
but the enormous progress in zoological science has been
fatal to the survival of most of them. Children of a prior
generation had their curiosity about the brute creation sat-
isfied by White's Selbome and Bewick's Quadrupeds; and
the former classic is even now reprinted in popular editions,
with illustrations which may and do attract the young. But
adults, and even scholars, alone can enjoy Selborne to the
full; while not merely is the Quadrupeds out of print and
difficult to procure, but its text is too antiquated to be use-
fully put before a child. Its incomparable illustrations de-
serve a perpetual lease of life. The first section of the pres-
ent compilation, entitled "Animals," though written more



10 FOR PARENTS.

than forty years ago, will, it is confidently believed, be as
fresh and trustworthy forty years hence as it is now.

The compiler has thought it an advantage to connect
stories about a great variety of animals with one person, and
he an observer of such credibility and authority that little
if anything that was learned of him would have to be un-
learned. Mr. Darwin is, of course, pre-eminently such an ob-
server. On the other hand, by carefully connecting these
stories also with the places on the earth's surface where the
animals were studied, a correct notion will be had of the
distribution of the animal kingdom, with a corresponding
insight into the geography of the globe in its broadest sense.
Finally, by placing these stories first in order, the attention
of the youngest readers is assured. No artificial grouping
has been attempted.

II. Scarcely inferior in interest to tales of animals are
accounts of strange peoples and customs, particularly of sav-
age and barbarous life. The section entitled " Man," there-
fore, should not disappoint the youthful reader.

III. Closely allied with the foregoing are the contents of
the section entitled (for want of a better designation) " Ge-
ography," which consists partly of descriptions of cities, the
habitations of man, partly of descriptions of rivers, moun-
tains, valleys, plains, and other physical features of the coun-
tries visited by Mr. Darwin.

IV. Finally, in the section styled " Nature " will be found
some account of the grander terrestrial processes and phe-



FOR PARENTS. 11

nomena, with other matters which a strict classification might
have placed in the preceding section, but which were inten-
tionally reserved till the last, as being least easy to compre-
hend. But experience may show that, on the whole, this is
far from being the least interesting of the four.

From what has been said, it will be perceived that, if the
attempted gradation has been successful, this book recom-
mends itself to every member of a household, from the
youngest to the oldest. A child may safely be left to read
as far as he is interested, or as far as he can understand with
facility, in the certainty that each year afterward he will
push his explorations a little further, till the end has been
reached and the whole is within his grasp. Meantime, par-
ents can read aloud selected passages even in advance of
the child's progress. Nor does the compiler seem to him-
self to overrate his collection of excerpts w r hen he suggests
its use as a graded reader in schools. Its capacity for rhe-
torical exercise will be found greater than might have been
expected, and those who have been led to believe Mr. Darwin
a materialist will discover here eloquent expression of human
sympathies as broad as those immortalized by the old Eo-
man comedian " Homo sum, humani nil a me alienum puto."

Some liberties have been taken with the original text.
Notices of the same animal, or place, or nationality, or phe-
nomenon, in different parts of the narrative, have been gath-
ered together and pieced where necessary; and (always after
much hesitation) a more simple word or phrase has occasion-



12 FOR PARENTS.

ally been substituted for a less simple. But the amount of
these additions and alterations is relatively so slight that it
is true to say that Mr. Darwin speaks throughout. A few
of the illustrations are borrowed from the original narrative
and from its sister reports; but by far the greater number
have been derived from other sources, and all with a view
to conveying correct information. The maps interspersed
with the text or placed at the end of the volume contain
every significant geographical name mentioned in the text.

After all, it is hoped that every one who here learns for
the first time a small portion of " what Mr. Darwin saw,"
on his memorable first journey abroad, will sooner or later
betake himself to the delightful and ever wonderful una-
bridged report of the most momentous voyage round the
world since Columbus.

NEW YORK, October 1, 1879.



FOR CHILDREN.



TWEKYBODY has eyes, but, as you know, some people

m 1

are blind ; and many of those who are not blind wear
glasses, and cannot see without them. But even those whose
eyes are good and strong do not all see alike. In a roomful
of people, you would be sure to see your father and mother;
and if all the rest were strangers to you, you would probably
not notice a good many of them. Or if you were just learn-
ing to read, and were shown a printed page, you would see
the words you know how to spell, and would pay very lit-
tle attention to most of the others. If we should go search-
ing for spring flowers, I, who know what anemones and
hepaticas are like, should find more than you who had never
seen them before. And if our walk was among woods, some
would come home remembering only that they had seen
trees; others, that they had seen pines and oaks; and I
alone, perhaps, that I had seen birches and ash -trees too.
And again, if our excursion was by roads you had never
travelled before, some of you could next time go the same



14



FOR CHILDREN.



way without my showing yon, while others would feel lost
at the first turn.




*.. & Str*ther,,-N. T.



So those see best who know the most, or who naturally
take notice of new things. Now Charles Darwin, about



FOR CHILDREN. 17

whom I am going to tell you presently, is one of the best
seers that ever lived, partly because he had learned so well
what to look for, and partly because nothing escaped his
eyes. Before he himself travelled, he read a great many
books of travel, and he seemed to remember at the right
time just what it was useful for him to remember. But
before that, he had trained himself, with the aid of the mi-
croscope, to observe little things; and people have not yet
got over their astonishment at learning how many important
things he thus saw which they had never seen, or had seen
without thinking them of any consequence. And now all
the world looks at things differently from what it used to
before he showed it how. How he saw things you will
partly see by reading the following pages, taken from his
account of the voyage of the Beagle.

Charles Darwin (whose full name is Charles Robert Dar-
win) was born at Shrewsbury, a famous town in Shropshire,
England, February 12, 1809. His father was Dr. Robert
Waring Darwin ; his grandfather Dr. Erasmus Darwin, also
a distinguished naturalist. His mother's father was Josiah
Wedgwood, the celebrated manufacturer of pottery, some
of which goes by his name. Mr. Darwin was educated, first
at Shrewsbury, then at the University of Edinburgh, and
finally at Christ's College, Cambridge. The end of his
schooling was in 1831. Then Captain Fitzroy invited him
to join the Beagle as naturalist, and he sailed from Devon-
port, England, December 27, 1831, not to return till October

2



18



FOR CHILDREN.



22, 1836. The object of the expedition was principally "to
complete the survey of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego, com-
menced under Captain King in 1826 to 1830, and to survey




THE KINGDOM OF .3ESOP.



the shores of Chili, Peru, and of some islands in the Pacific,"
besides sailing round the world. The first Christmas -day
spent away from England (1832) was at St. Martin's Cove,



FOR CHILDREN. 19

near Cape Horn; the second (1833), at Port Desire, in Pat-
agonia; the third (1834), in a wild harbor in the peninsula
of Tres Montes, also in Patagonia; the fourth and last (1835),
at the Bay of Islands, New Zealand. The map facing page
17 will show you the course of the expedition.

Before beginning to read "What Mr. Darwin Saw," try
how good a seer you are by counting the various animals
shown in the wood-engraving on the opposite page, by the
great Thomas Bewick.



CONTENTS.



PREFACE FOR PARENTS Page 9

PREFACE FOR CHILDREN . 13



ANIMALS.



The Horse Page 29

The Mule 33

The Ox 34

The Dog ........ 37

The Monkey 38

The Guanaco 41

The Puma 44

The Jaguar 46

The Bizcacha 48

The Seal - . . 50

The Whale 52

The Porpoise ........ 53

The Lizard 56

The Tortoise . 60



The Toad

The Cuttle-fish

The Cormorant

The Penguin

The Condor

The Ostrich

The Casarita . '

Tame Birds on Desert Islands

The Grasshopper

The Locust

The Ant

The Wasp

The Spider

The Crab .



63
64
65
65
66
71
74
75
81
81
83
84
85
86



MAN.



The Savage ....... 92

The Fuegian 93

The Patagonian 104

The Indian of the Pampas . .105

The Negro Ill

The Gaucho .116



The La Platan 124

The Uruguayan 125

The Chileno 128

The Spaniard 132

The Tahitian 135

The Australian Negro . . . .138



22



CONTENTS.



GEOGRAPHY.



Uruguay Page 143

River Parana 144

Plate River 146

La Plata 146

The Pampas 149

Tierra del Fuego 151

Chiloe . .153



Valparaiso Page 1 54

Quillota 157

Valdivia 158

Chile 159

Lima 159

Tahiti 163

New South Wales . 164



NATURE.



Forests 170

The Kauri Pine 171

The Beech 172

The Kelp 172

Mountains 175

Fossil Trees , .178



An Old Sea-bed . ... . .182

Earthquakes 183

Rainfall 193

Hibernation of Animals . . .195

The Ocean 196

Lagoon Islands 197



INDEX OF NOTABLE PERSONS 205

GENERAL INDEX . 219



ILLUSTRATIONS.



PAGE

1. CHARLES DARWIN Frontispiece

2. THE "BEAGLE" BEACHED AT THE MOUTH OF THE SANTA CRUZ Vignette

3. THE KINGDOM OF ^Esor (AFTER BEWICK) 18

4. ANCIENT GREEK HORSE-RACE 30

5. THRESHING GRAIN WITH HORSES IN ARMENIA (AsiA MINOR) ... 31

6. FOSSIL REMAINS OF A MEGATHERIUM 32

7. FOSSIL REMAINS OF AN ELEPHANT 32

8. GAUCHOS BRANDING CATTLE ON AN ESTANCIA 35

9. SHEPHERD-DOG 37

10. MONKEY WITH PREHENSILE TAIL 38

11. TOUCANS 41

12. GUANACO (FROM A PHOTOGRAPH) 42

13. PUMA .45

14. JAGUAR 46

15. CAPIBARA 46

16. AUSTRALIAN BOWER BIRD 49

17. SEAL 51

18. TERN 51

19. GULL 51

20. SEA-LION (FROM A PHOTOGRAPH) 52

21. PHOSPHORESCENT SEA 55

22. CACTUS GROWTH IN THE DESERTS OF UTAH 59

23. TORTOISE 61

24. CUTTLE-FISH 64

25. CORMORANT 65

26. CONDOR 67

27. SKELETON OF AN OSTRICH .72



24 ILLUSTRATIONS.

PAGE

28. ST. PAUL'S ROCKS 75

29. NODDY 76

30. FLYING-FISH 77

31. HEAD OF A FLY-CATCHER 78

32. TURTLE-DOVE 78

33. "EARTH" OF THE Fox 79

34. WILD GOOSE 80

35. OWL 80

36. GRASSHOPPER 81

37. LOCUSTS 82

38. ARMY OF ANTS .83

39. WASP AND SPIDER 85

40. SPIDER 86

41. ROBBER-CRAB 87

42. LION IN HIS DESERT (FROM A PHOTOGRAPH) 92

43. RHINOCEROS (FROM A PHOTOGRAPH) 93

44. NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN WINNEBAGO (FROM A PHOTOGRAPH) . . 95

45. SOUTH AFRICAN KAFFIR 97

46. AUSTRALIAN ABORIGINES 98

47. FUEGIAN FEAST 100

48. SOUTH SEA ISLANDERS 103

49. BUSHMEN OF SOUTH AFRICA 104

50. LENGUA INDIANS (PLATE RIVER BASIN) 106

51. SOLDIERS OF GENERAL ROSAS 107

52. POST ON THE PAMPAS 112

53. PERNAMBUCO 114

54. GAUCHO 117

55. NOT TO BE THROWN .119

56. USE OF LAZO AND BOLAS 122

57. AGOUTI 124

58. ESTANCIERO 127

59. TANATERO ORE-CARRIER 131

60. TAMARIND-TREE AT POINT VENUS, TAHITI, SOCIETY ISLANDS . . .133

61. NATIVE BAMBOO HOUSE, TAHITI 136

62. FIRE BY FRICTION . . ..-. . . .137

63. BANANA LEAVES AND FRUIT-STALK. . .... . . '. . . .137

64. BANANA BLOSSOM 138

65. AUSTRALIAN NEGRO . 139



ILL US TEA TIONS. 25

PAGE

66. KANGAROO 139

67. AUSTRALIAN "CORROBERY" 140

68. OLIVE BRANCH 143

69. MONTEVIDEO, FROM THE SEA 144

70. MONTEVIDEO, LOOKING TOWARD THE HARBOR 146

71. OX-CART OF THE PAMPAS 148

72. MOUNTAINS AND GLACIERS IN MAGELLAN STRAIT 152

73. CUSTOMS GUARD-HOUSE, VALPARAISO, CHILE 154

74. PLAZA DE LA CONSTITUCION, SANTA CRUZ 155

75. PEAK OF TENERIFFE 156

76. ORANGE-GROVES 157

77. LIMA 161

78. FRUIT OF THE BREAD-FRUIT TREE 163

79. AVENUE OF PALMS, BOTANIC GARDENS, Rio 164

80. TAHITIAN COAST SCENERY 165

81. CAPE TOWN, CAPE OF GOOD HOPE (FROM A PHOTOGRAPH) . . . 166

82. EUCALYPTUS-TREE, OR BLUE-GUM (FROM A PHOTOGRAPH) . . . .167

83. MANGO FRUIT . 171

84. CHRISTMAS HARBOR, KERGUELEN LAND 173

85. STAR-FISH ' 175

86. USPALLATA PASS 180

87. CAPE FROWARD (PATAGONIA), STRAIT OF MAGELLAN 182

88. ISLAND OF JUAN FERNANDEZ 189

89. ROBINSON CRUSOE 190

90. ALBATROSS 197

91. VIEW OF AN ATOLL 199

92. COCOA-NUT PALM (FROM A PHOTOGRAPH) 200

93. CORAL ARCHITECTS 202

94. POLYP 203

95. GROWTH OF CORAL ON A MOUNTAIN SLOWLY SUBSIDING .... 204

96. JOHN JAMES AUDUBON 206

97. ADMIRAL JOHN BYRON 208

98. CAPTAIN JAMES COOK 209

99. KARAKAKOOA BAY, THE SCENE OF CAPTAIN COOK'S DEATH . . . 210
100. CAPTAIN WILLIAM DAMPIER .... .212



MAPS AND CHARTS.



PAGE
I. ENGLAND AND WALES 14

II. COURSE OF THE "BEAGLE" 16

III. BAY OF Rio DE JANEIRO , .... 39

IV. GALAPAGOS ISLANDS 57

V. CANARY ISLANDS 155

VI. LIMA AND CALLAO 162

VII. ISLAND OF JUAN FERNANDEZ 189

VIII. KEELING ISLAND 198

IX. EASTERN HEMISPHERE 229

X. WESTERN HEMISPHERE 231

XL CHILE, ARGENTINE CONFEDERATION, URUGUAY 233

XII. PATAGONIA, TIERRA DEL FUEGO 235



I.

ANIMALS.



WHAT MR. DARWIN SAW.



THE HORSE.



URUGUAY.



T ONCE crossed the River Santa Lucia near its mouth,
-*- and was surprised to observe how easily our horses, al-
though not used to swim, passed over a width of at least
six hundred yards. On mentioning this at Montevideo, I
was told that a vessel containing some mountebanks and
their horses being wrecked in the Plata, one horse swam seven
miles to the shore. In the course of the day I was amused
by the skill with which a Gaucho forced a restive horse to
swim a river. He stripped off all his clothes, and, jumping on
its back, rode into the water till it was out of its depth ; then,
slipping off over the crupper, he caught hold of the tail, and
as often as the horse turned round the man frightened it
back by splashing water in its face. As soon as the horse
touched the bottom on the other side, the man pulled him-
self on, and was firmly seated, bridle in hand, before the
horse gained the bank. A naked man on a naked horse is
a fine spectacle; I had no idea how well the two animals
suited each other. The tail of a horse is a very useful ap-



30



WHAT MR. DARWIN SAW



URUGUAY



pendage : I have passed a river in a boat with four people
in it, which was ferried across in the same way as the Gau-
cho. If a man and horse have to cross a broad river, the




A NAKED MAN ON A NAKED HORSE. (ANCIENT GREEK HORSE-RACE.)

best plan is for the man to catch hold of the pommel or
mane, and help himself with the other arm.

We were delayed crossing the Kio Colorado by some
immense troops of mares, which were swimming the river in
order to follow a division of troops into the interior. A
more ludicrous spectacle I never beheld than the hundreds
and hundreds of heads, all directed one way, with pointed
ears and distended nostrils, appearing just above the water,
like a great shoal of some amphibious animal. Mares' flesh
is the only food which the soldiers have when on an expe-
dition. This gives them a great facility of movement, for
the distance to which horses can be driven over these plains
is quite surprising. I have been assured that an unloaded
horse can travel a hundred miles a day for many days suc-
cessively.

At an estancia (grazing farm) near Las Vacas large num-
bers of mares are weekly slaughtered for the sake of their
hides, although worth only five paper dollars apiece. It
seems at first strange that it can answer to kill mares for



THE HORSE. 31



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC.



such a trifle; but as it is thought ridiculous in this country
ever to break in or ride a mare, they are of no value except
for breeding. The only thing for which I ever saw mares
used was to tread out wheat from the ear; for which pur-
pose they were driven round a circular enclosure, where the
wheat-sheaves were strewed.

It is a marvellous fact that in South America a native
horse should have lived and disappeared, to be succeeded
in after-ages by the countless herds descended from the few
introduced with the Spanish colonists ! As the remains of
elephants, mastodons, horses, and hollow -horned ruminants
are found on both sides of Behring's Straits and on the
plains of Siberia, we are led to look to the north-western
side of North America as the former point of communication
between the Old and the so-called New World. And as so
many species, both living and extinct, of these same genera




THRESHING CORN WITH HORSES IN ARMENIA.

inhabit and have inhabited the Old World, it seems most
probable that the North American elephants, mastodons,



32



WHAT MR. DARWIN SAW.



ARGENTINE REPUBLIC.




FOSSIL REMAINS OF A MEGATHERIUM.



horses, and hollow-horned ruminants migrated, on land since
submerged near Behring's Straits, from Siberia into North
America, and thence, on land since submerged in the West




FOSSIL REMAINS OF AN ELEPHANT.



THE MULE. 33



CHILE,



Indies, into South America, where for a time they mingled
with the forms characteristic of that southern continent, and
have since become extinct.

The horse was first landed at Buenos Ayres in 1537, and
the colony being then for a time deserted, the horse ran
wild. In 1580, only forty-three years afterward, we hear of
them at the Strait of Magellan !

THE MULE.

WHEN about half-way up the Portillo Pass, we met a
large party with seventy loaded mules. It was interesting
to hear the wild cries of the muleteers, and to watch the
long descending string of the animals; they appeared so
diminutive, there being nothing but the bleak mountains
with which they could be compared. The madrina (or
godmother) is a most important personage: she is an old,
steady mare, with a little bell round her neck; and wher-
ever she goes, the mules, like good children, follow her. The
affection of these animals for their madrinas saves infinite
trouble. If several large troops are turned into one field to
graze, in the morning the muleteers have only to lead the
madrinas a little apart, and tinkle their bells ; and, although
there may be two or three hundred together, each mule im-
mediately knows the bell of its own madrina, and comes to
her. It is nearly impossible to lose an old mule; for if
detained for several hours by force, she will, by the power of
smell, like a dog, track out her companions (or rather the
madrina, for, according to the muleteer, she is the chief ob-

3



34 WHAT MR. DARWIN SAW.



URUGUAY.



ject of affection. I believe I am right, however, in saying
that any animal with a bell will serve as a madrina). In a
troop, each animal carries, on a level road, a cargo weighing
four hundred and sixteen pounds, but in a mountainous coun-
try one hundred pounds less; yet with what delicate, slim
limbs, without any proportional bulk of muscle, these animals
support so great a burden ! The mule always appears to me
a most surprising animal. That the offspring of the horse
and the ass should possess more reason, memory, obstinacy,
social affection, powers of muscular endurance, and length
of life, than either of its parents, seems to indicate that art
has here outdone nature.



THE OX.

THE chief trouble with an estancia (grazing farm) is
driving the cattle twice a week to a central spot, in order
to make them tame and to count them. This latter opera-
tion would be thought difficult where there are ten or fif-
teen thousand head together. It is managed on the princi-
ple that the cattle invariably divide themselves into little
troops (tropillas) of from forty to a hundred. Each troop
is recognized by a few peculiarly marked animals, and its
number is known ; so that, one being lost out of ten thou-
sand, it is perceived by its absence from one of the tropi-
llas. During a stormy night the cattle all mingle together,
but the next morning the tropillas separate as before; so
that each animal must know its fellow out of ten thousand
others.



THE DOG. 37



URUGUAY.



THE DOG.

WHEN riding, it is a common thing to meet a large
flock of sheep guarded by one or two dogs, at the distance
of some miles from any house or man. I often wondered
how so firm a friendship had been established. The method
of education consists in separating the puppy, while very
young, from its mother, and in accustoming it to its future
companions. A ewe is held three or four times a day for




SHEPHERD-DOG.



the little thing to suck, and a nest of wool is made for it in
the sheep -pen; at no time is it allowed to associate with
other dogs, or with the children of the family. From this
education, it has no wish to leave the flock ; and just as an-
other dog will defend its master, man, so will these the sheep.
It is amusing to observe, when approaching a flock, how the
dog immediately advances barking, and the sheep all close
in his rear, as if round the oldest ram. These dogs are also
easily taught to bring home the flock at a certain hour



38



WHAT MR. DARWIN SAW.



BRAZIL.



in the evening. Their most troublesome fault, when young,
is their desire of playing with the sheep ; for in their sport
they sometimes gallop the poor things most unmercifully.

The shepherd-dog comes to the house every day for some
meat, and as soon as it is given him he skulks away, as if
ashamed of himself. On these occasions the house-dogs are
very tyrannical, and the least of them will attack and pur-
sue the stranger. The minute, however, the latter has reached
the flock, he turns round and begins to bark, and then all
the house-dogs take very quickly to their heels. In a sim-
ilar manner, a whole pack of the hungry wild dogs will
scarcely ever venture to attack a flock guarded by even
one of these faithful shepherds. In this case the shepiierd-
dog seems to regard the sheep as its fellow -brethren, and

thus gains confidence ;
and the wild dogs,
though knowing that
the individual sheep are
not dogs, but are good
to eat, yet, when seeing
them in a flock with a
shepherd - dog at their
head, partly consent to
regard them as he does.

THE MONKEY.




MONKEY WITH PREHENSILE TAIL.



DUEING my stay at
Rio de Janeiro I resided



BAY OF
RIO DE JANEIRO




BmM>ll&8trathm.N.r.



THE GUANACO.



41



BRAZIL.



in a cottage at Botafogo Bay. An old Portuguese priest
took me out to hunt with him. The sport consisted in
turning into the cov-
er a few dogs, and
then patiently wait-
ing to fire at any
animal which might
appear. My com-
panion, the day be-
fore, had shot two
large bearded mon-
keys. These animals
have prehensile tails,
the extremity of
which, even after
death, can support
the whole weight
of the body. One
of them thus remained fast to a branch, and it was neces-
sary to cut down a large tree to procure it. This was
soon done, and down came tree and monkey with an awful
crash. Our day's sport, besides the monkey, was confined to
some small green parrots and a few toucans.




TOUCANS.



THE GUANACO.

THE guanaco, or wild llama, is the characteristic quadru-


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11

Online LibraryCharles DarwinWhat Mr. Darwin saw in his voyage round the world in the ship Beagle. → online text (page 1 of 11)