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From the collection of the



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LIBRARY

ESTABLISHED Io72

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" Tlie Story of our Lives from Year to Year.'''' — Shakespeaee.



ALL THE YEAR ROUND.



SI U\ttk\^ SouinaL



CONDUCTED BY



CHARLES DICKENS, Jun.



WITH WHICH IS INCORPORATED HOUSEHOLD WORDS.



J^EAAT" SEI^IIES



VOLUME V

From December 3, 1870, to May % 1871
Including No. 105 to No. 130.




LONDON:
PUBLISHED AT N^- 26, WELLINGTON STREET;

AND BY MESSRS. CHAPMAN AND HALL, 193, PICCADILLY.

1871.



^.



'-^



LONDON:
C. WHITINS, BEAUFORT HOUSE, DUKE STREET, LINCOLX'S-INN-FIELDS




2^b



^ -



.s^



CONTENTS.



Abbotsford .
AdYertisemeots
Africivn Diamond Fields
America, Lecturing in .
American Lyceums
American Phrases
Animals, Protective Tints of
Arthur's Seat .
Artist at Work, An

Badajoz, Siege of .

Bannockburn, Battle of

Batley, Bags Sent to

Batley Woollen Works .

Battle-Field, A

Bethany and Bethlehem

Big " Box o' Whustles," A

Bill Posting Advertisements

Bismarck

Bluff Harr,' .

Boar Hunt in Germany .

Bombay, A Day at .

Borrowing Trouble

Borthwick Castle .

Bradford to Brindisi . . 25

Brigands ....

Hunkum ....

Butterflies and Moths, Tints of

Cackleks ....
Canvas Under Canvas .
Capture of a Convoy
Carlisle, The Siege of .
Carthage, Siege of .
Cave of Adullam .

Cheese

Christmas Day in the East .
Christmas Under a Cloud
Christmas Under the Puritans
Ciudad Rodrigo
City of Honest Imposture, The
Clocks and Hour Glasses
Cloth Manufactures
Constantinople, Siege of
Cophetua the Second
Corvin, Colonel, Life of .
Country Scamps
Crichton Castle
Cromwell and Christmas
Cuba, A State of Siege in
Cuba, Prison Life in
Cyprus, The Three-Eyed Man of



Darwin's Descent of Man . . 445

Day at Bombay, A . . . . 584

Dead Sea, The .... 180

Dear Davie 379

Descent of Man , The . . . 445

Defence of London . . . 40'J

Defence of Saragossa . . . 280

Desirable Tenant, A . . . 4S5

Desert, In Danger in Ihe . . 450

Diamond Fields of Africa . . 617

Doctor's Mixture, The . . 1

25, 49, 73, 97. 121, 14-5, 187, 211
Doctor Tyndall on Science and

Imagination .... 174

Dryburgh Abbey .... 151



PAGE
41
329
017
317
317
270
469
37
594

296
154
441
441
104

61
201
329
127
297

91
584
162

38

>, 276

256

272

472

249

694
301
65S

56

33
488

84
101
101
294
440
419
441

59

565

321

8

38
104
610
222
516



TAGB
EAST, Travels in the, 15, 29, 35, 60, 84, 180
Eddy's, Mr., Scheme for Defence

of London 49G

Edinburgh 37

Entertainment at Mopetown . 539

Epigram Writers .... 34

Evenings at Mopetown . . 539, 607

Fairs 393

Falkirk, Th» Battle of . . . 153
Famous old Sieges .... 64
Field Hospital, In a . . . 372
Fishes, Poisonous .... 366
Fishes, The Thoughts of . . 535
Foreign Invaders .... 133
Fortification of London . . . 492
i France, May-Day in . . . 542
France. The Trianons at Ver-
sailles 6

French Refugees .... 134

French in London .... 134

From Bradford to Brindisi . 252, 276

Gala, The River . . . .39

General Reader, The . . . 465

German Sport 91

German Railway Stations . . 254

German-French War Scenes . 104
157, 205, 301, 384, 372, 399

Ghost Stories. A String of . . 77

Ghouls and VampjTes . . . 597

Gloomy Views .... 162

Golightly, .Mrs 464

Grand Duke of Mecklenburgh's

Corps 399

Greek Brigands .... 256

ROLBORN Races . . . .12

Holborn Theatre, Races at the . 12

Holy Sepulchre, Church of the . 18

Horses and Hedges . . . 463

Hotel, A, Visitor out of Season . 165

Household Ornaments . . . 416

House Hunting .... 485

How it Happened .... 07

How to See India .... 420

Ignis Fatuus 352

In Danger in the Desert . . 453

India, A Day at Bombay . . 584

Indi(, How to See .... 429

Insects. Protective Tints of . . 4S9

Institutions 391

In the Field with the Prussians :

A Battle-Field .... 104

Requisitioning .... 157

A Perilous Position . . . 205
A Convoy Captured, and how

we escaped .... 301
A Sortie from Metz . . . 348
Day's Routine in a Field Hos-
pital 372

With the Grand Duke of Meck-
lenburgh's Corps . . . 399
In the Penguin's Arms . . . 165
It ilian Peasant Stories . . . 3'24

Jack Cade's Riots .... 494



I '



page
Jericho, the City of . . . .184
Jericho Theatre . . . .111
Jerusalem . . . _. 15

Jerusalem, The Siege of . . 67
Jordon, The River .... 1S3

Last Town Besieged in England . 65S

Leaves from Old London Life . 232

Life of Adventure, A . . . 321

Lights, Will o' the Wisp . . 352

Linlithgow 151

Lon Ion, Defence of . . . 494

Loudon, Fortification of . . 492

London, Old, News .... '232

London Parcel Post . . . 670

London Sieges .... 492

London Wall 492

London Wants .... 305
Looseflsh, Mr. .... 464
Lost Literary Art. A . . .84
Lyceums and Lecturing in Ame-
rica 317

Lynch Law 394

Madame Crowl's Ghost . . 114
Magdeburg, Siege of . . . 293
Marked tor the Knife ... 46
Marriage of English Princesses . 376
May-Day among the Mules . . 542
May Queen. The .... 395
Melrose Abbey . . . .39
Mendelsshon Jackson Family . 608
Metz, A Sortie from . . . 348
Military Talkers and Doers . . 64
Miss Ponsonby's Companion . 236
259, 284, 307, 332, 358
Mopetown, Evenings at . . 539, 607
Jlorro Castle, In Prison in . . 223

Jlount Olivet 15

Mountain's, Mrs^ Entertairmient . 539
My Boy in Indui .... 420
Mules, May-Day Among the . . 542

Munich 276

My Census Paper .... 621
My New Idea . . . 403, 427

Newark Castle .... 151
New Years Day in Scotland . 108
Numantia, Siege of ... 54

Old Household Ornaments . . 416
Old London News .... 232
Old London Wall . . . .492
Old Project and a New One, An . 670
Olives, The Mount of . . . 15
Omnibus Dinner, The ... 42
Oloron, May-Day at . . . 642
Only on the Box . . . .199
Organ-building .... 201
Ornaments of the Household . 416
Overland Route .... 422

Parcel Delivery, An Old Scheme



for
Parcel Post Delivery

Peace of God, The .
Peace, Treaties of .



570
570
397
398
423



<^-^



IV



CONTENTS.



PACE

Penguin's Arms, The . . . l'<-5
Perturbed Spirit, A . . . .141
Philiphaugh Castle . . . 151
Plogarrian . 473, 498, 523, 547, 572



Poisonous Fishes
Popular American Phrases .
Post Office Parcel Delivery .
Princesses (English) Marriages of
Prison Life in Cuba
Protec-tive Eesemhlances
Prussia, Winter Shooting in .
Prussia, Sporting in
Prussian Eevolution, A .
Puffing Advertisements .
Puritans Putting Down Holidays .



37,



337

.',29.

57



36G
270
571
376
222
469
91
91
321
329
101

, G13
441

150
134
157
306
40
169
361,
553,
601
395
376



PAGE
Christmas Day in the East . 84
The Dead Sea, The Jordan, and

J[ericho 180

Smoking 395



Eackstraw'S Client . . 587.

Eags

Raids Over the Border :

The Land of Scott

Refugees

Requisitioning

Roadways, New Material of .
Robert Bruce, Tomb of .
Rose and the Key, The .

1J.3, 217, 241, 265, 289, 31-3,

385, 409, 433, 457, 481, 505,

Rosifere, The ....

Royal Marriages

■SAetTNTUM, Siege of ... 54

Salisbury Crags .... 37

Saltaire 185

Saragossa. The Defence of . . 280 i

Scamps of the Village, The . . 8

Science and Imagination . . 174 \

Scorpion Fish .... 371
Scotland, Tour in . . . 37, 150

Scotland, New Years Day in . 108

Sea Monster.? .... 371

Seven Dials, Sunday in . . . 511

Siege of Bailajoz .... 296

Siege of Carlisle .... 558

Siege of Ciudad Rodrigo . . 294

Siege of Magdeburg . . . 293

Siege of Saragossa . . . 280

Sieges in Ancient History . . 64

Sieges of London .... 492

Sir Thomas Wyatt's Rebellion . 494

Sir Walter Scott's Home . . 41
Six .Mouths in the East :

At Jerusalem .... 15

The Wilderness of Judeea . . 29

Cave of Adullam ... 33

Bethany and Bethlehem . . 60



Social Brigandage
Social Sinners ....

Solar Furnace, The
Some Famous Treaties .
Spiritual Stance, A . . .

South of France, May-Day in the .
State of Siege in Cuba
Stories :

Cophetua the Second .

Dear Davie

How it Happened

In Danger in the Desert

In the Penguin's Arms

Madam Crowl's Ghost

Marked for the Knife

Miss Ponsonby's Companion
259,

My Census Paper

My New Idea

Only o!i the Box .

Perturbed Spirit .

Plogarriau . 473,

Rackstraw's Client

Stories of Italian Peasantry

String of Ghost Stories

Three-Eyed Man of Cj-prus
Stirling Castle ....
Stories of the Italian Peasantry .
Street Advertising ....

■Street Shows

String of Ghost Stories .

Sun. The

Sunday in the Seven Dials
Surgeon's Day in a Field Hospital
Swindling Professors



257
463
324

4-'3
297
542
610

565

379

67

450

165

114

46

236

284, 307, 332, 356

. 521

. 403, 427

. 199

. 141

499, 523, 547, 572

. 587, 613

342

77

516

153

324

329

443

77

324

511

372

138



Talkers and Doers . . . . 64

Telegraph Employment . . 232

Telegraph Service, The . . .228

Thames Embankment . . . 305

Theatre Royal, Jericho . . . Ill

Theatre. Holborn, Races . . 12

Three-Eyed .Alan of Cyprus . .516

Three Modern Sieges . . . 293

Thoughts on Puffing . . . 329

Thoughts of Fishes, The . . 535

Tints of Animals, &c. . . . 473

Tower of London .... 493

Travelling Entertainments . . 539

Treaties of Peace .... 423

Treaties, Historical . . . 423

Treaty of WestphaMa . . . 424



PAGE
Trianons, The, at Versailles . . 5
T. S 227

Unexpected Expostulation, An . 465
Useless Warnings .... 138

Vamptres and Ghouls . . .587
Vehmgericht, The . . . .394
Versailles and the Trianons . . 5
Village Scamps .... 8

Wanted for London . . .305
War between France and Prussia,

Scenes in the 104

157, 205, 301, 348, 372, 399
Wat Tyler's Rebellion . . .494

"Who Was He? 20

Wild Boar Hunt in Germany . 91
William the Conqueror's March

on London 493

Will o' the Wisp and his Relations 352
Wilderness of Judtea ... 29
Winter Shooting in Prussia . . 91
Wool Workers at Saltaire . . 185
Woollen Works .... 441
Work of an Artist . . .594

Wyatt's Rebellion . . . .494

Yarrow River . . . .150
Yorkshire Colony .... 185

POETRY.

Chastened 4r2

Evening 396

Fredericus Rex fOId Fritz) . . 179

From Bordeaux to Paris, 1871 . 348

Good-Bye 372

German Hussar Pongs . . . 227

Harp Unstrung, The . . . 420

Last Words 60

March 323

Morning on the Mountains . . 301

My Toy 157

'Neath the Scaur . . . .251

News to Tell 516

Passing 565

Regrets 445

Sea Song 541

Sleeping Homestead, A . . . 108

Soldiers' Ballads . . . . ?75

Song for Music, A . . . . 587

Sortie from Naumburg ... 84

Squire Coe and his Daughters . 468

Swing, The 133

Two Points of View . . .12
Wife's Vigil , . . .205




i



n



THE DOCTOPi'S MIXTUPiE.



BOOK III.
CHAPTER XVI. AN AWKWARD MEETING.

On the next day the young lord began
to find himself bored, and hearing there
was a regiment quartered in the town, said
he would go in and "beat them up," to see
if he knew any of them. He returned at
lunch-time, having " beat up " Colonel
Bouchier, who he found "had known his
father" — that very common link of ac-
quaintance, like some useful nag which jogs
between two distant posts.

The band played, it seemed, at three,
so, with a yawn, he said he would stroll
in and see what that was like. He then
set off. The day passed by. Miss Jessie
paid a visit to Mr. Leader in the library,
and was shocked to find him there. She had
thought she would have it all to herself
She had been thinking over the wonder-
fully interesting things he had been telling
her last night. It grew dark — came to
dressing-bell — to dinner — but the young
lord had not returned. His mother sud-
denly recollected Colonel Bouchier — his
father's old friend. The colonel had kept
him to dine; that explained it all. The
dinner passed over. Katey appeared, shy,
and almost cowed. The poor girl at times
felt her courage and resolution quite aban-
don her. It grew to ten, eleven o'clock ;
and it was not until past one o'clock that
the young gentleman got to his bedroom.

At breakfast next morning he was jDlied
with a shower of questions. He must have
had a very agreeable party ? How did he
like the officers ? He was a little embar-
rassed, as Katey alone noticed, laughing
before he answered. "Ob, the officers were
uncommon nice — that is, the colonel and

VOL. V.



never



Lead



er.



a man they called Montague — a very good
fellow." But where were the rest of the
mess ? " Oh, they weren't asked. I never
said I was dining at the mess,
thought of such a thing."

A nervousness came over Mrs.
" And where did you dine, then, Lord Sea-
man r

" Oh, didn't I tell you?" he said. " Well,
the colonel introduced me to such a first-
rate fellow, who was smoking a cigar at
his rooms. Mr. Cecil Leader knows him,
and so do you, Mrs. Leader," he added,
slyly.

"No — not that— Doctor Findlater?"
she said, with a sort of horror.

" That Doctor Findlater ? He's a very
good fellow — tilled my case with smuggled
cigars, and insisted on us all dining Avith
him — such a dinner as he gave ! And there
was a parson that sang and made us all die
laughing'. And then he has a daughter —
I beg your pardon, Mrs. Cecil — that's the
prettiest, liveliest young girl I ever met.
Lord, how we got on !"

The consternation, the stujoefied looks at
this news, may be conceived ! It was a
most awkward situation. If Katey had
been absent, some attempt at showing him
the heinousness of his conduct could have
been made. But the young man went on
recklessly : " Why don't you have him up
here ? They are Mrs. C.'s relations, and, as
Doctor Pin says, are now your connexions,
Mrs. Leader. He says that's the common
sense of the thing ; that it's like the ostrich
sticking its head in the sand, and thinking
it's hid all the time. He is the pleasantest,
most genial creature, full of stories, and so
gentlemanly. Quite a wrong view you gave
me, Mrs. Leader. As for the daughter. Miss
Polly, I am quite in love with her. She'c
be the handsomest girl in London."




.&



2 [December 3, 1870.]



ALL THE TEAR ROUND.



[Conducted by



Lady Seaman said austerely, " You are
talking folly, child. You sliould recollect
that this subject is not very suitable here."

"What nonsense," said the young man,
eagerly. " Are not the fixniihes connected '?
Isn't Cecil Leader here Doctor Fin's son-
in-law ? As the Doctor says, you might as
well try and wash the spots off a cat's tail.
Oh, how I laughed last night !"

Mrs. Leader was looking a little wildly
from one face to the other, murmur-
ing something that was unintelligible, not
knowinof whether she ousfht to smile or
not. Katey was looking at him with a
friendly good-nature which she could not
restrain.

"Put such nonsense out of your head,"
said Lady Seaman. " It is very bad taste
of you under the circumstances. Mrs.
Cecil Leader knows the footing her father
is on with the family, and she must excuse
me if I tell you that gentleman is not a
person you should know."

"Oh, I have no quarrel with him, mother,"
said the young lord, carelessly. " And he
knows everybody about here."

After breakfast he said he would take a
gun and go "potting about the country."
It was a bitter, sharp, miserable day,
but Miss Jessie and Mr. Leader appeared
muffled up, and ready for a walk. He was
going to show her their little court, where
the magistrates sat, and which she was
" dying to see." He was rather sheepish
as he announced this plan, and actually
blushed.

As he was going out, the voice of Mrs.
Leader was heard to call after him sweetly,
" I want to speak to you, John dear, in
the boudoir a moment."

Her husband made a muttered protest :
" Oh, it will do when I come in. What's
the use of going now, and keeping Miss
Forsythe waiting." But he went, never-
theless.

" Surely you are not mad enough to
go out such a day, with your weak chest,
making yourself ridiculous, besides, with
that girl. Everybody is laughing at you
for making such a fool of yourself. You
know you are not fit for these young
pranks."

"Now don't worry me," said he, fret-
fully. " You are always worrying me. I
can't stay. I promised to go."

" Yes, always after some trifle. And
what are we to do with this Findlater,
A\'ho, remember, I tell you, vdll try and get
hold of this boy for that low girl of his ?"

Much put out, Mr. Leader depai'ted, pro-



mising to return soon. The foolish little
man, unaccustomed all his life to hear
words of compliment, or to have his stories
listened to, was quite enchanted by the
zest exhibited by his new friend.

After they had gone her ladyship gra-
ciously signified that she should like a
drive. " To be sure, dear Lady Seaman.
I will drive you myself" And presently
the amazed lady of quahty came down to
the door to find a dainty little carriage and
skittish little ponies, and the engaging
chariotress, in a light hat, with a fairy-like
parasol-whip, and all the charming cha-
racteristics of sweet seventeen. A smile
came to her guest's face as she took her
seat, and they drove away. How many
plans, how much of " laying heads to-
gether" took place in that little drive ^ A
perfect hatching of a conspiracy, with low,
earnest voices.

They drove into the town, as her lady-
ship wished to buy a cap "cheap," and
Mrs. Leader believed somethinar of the kind
could be got at M'lntyi-e's. As they were
driving away out of the town, past one of
the little lanes near the Doctor's house,
they saw two figures, and Lady Seaman
called out :

" Bless me ! who on earth is that Seaman
is with ?"

The figures heard the sound of the
wheels, and turned to look. That action
revealed our blushing Polly, quite scared,
like some tender fawn who has been brows-
ing, lifting nervously her pretty head as
she hears the distant barking of the dogs.
She made as though she would spring
away over the fields, and escape. The
young man coloured, then cried out :

"Don't go. It's only my mother."

The carriage was now up to them, and
Mrs. Leader had to pull up her ponies.

" Of course you know Mrs. Leader ?
Mother, this is the young lady at whose
father's house I was telling you we had
such a jolly night — Miss Polly Leader."

The lady bowed stiffly, and Polly dropped
a sort of stage curtesy.

" I thought you had gone out shooting,"
said his mother, without noticing "the
gii'l." " Here, get up into the back seat,
and come home."

"Oh, I can't, indeed. I've an — ap-
pointment in the town ; and you wouldn't
have me leave a nice young lady alone in
the fields ?"

" Oh, papa is at the band," faltered
Polly, really frightened at the two terrible
ladies. "I can easily get there."



- ^



Charles Dickens, Jan.]



THE DOCTOR'S MIXTURE.



[December 3, 1870,]



"Not at all," said lie. "I'll go with
yon." And, in trnth, the sonndof military
mnsic could be heard where they were
standing. " I tell you what, why .shouldn't
yon drive round and see it ? It's great
fun. All the town is there."

At this moment were seen the figui-es of
two gentlemen approaching. How had it
happened ? Was it that our Doctor had
seen from afar off the glittering equipage,
and Avas attracted by it, in the hope of
something- turning up ? Or was it that he
had seen "the situation," and what could
be made of it ? With him was Captain
Molyneux.

" I declare here is the Doctor himself,"
said the young man, in mischievous enjoy-
ment of what was to follow. " He does not
know that it is you who are here."

Mrs. Leader knew not what to do ; her
impulse was to drive on ; but she did not
want to seem afraid before Lady Seaman.

" Oh, really this is unbearable," said
that lady.

" You down here, my dear Lady Sea-
man ?" said the captain, taking off his hat.
He knew nearly all the " figure-heads of
society," as they might be called. "Ah,
Miss Polly, and you here ? Nice work this.
Your father won't approve of this."

The Doctor made a respectful bow to
Mrs. Leader. " Ah, captain, she's think-
ing of the pleasant evening we had the
other night, when his lordship amused us
all so much. Eh, Polly pet ?"

All this was so much torture for Mrs.
Leader, perched up high, in a yery awk-
ward position. She was, besides, con-
scious that the Doctor was gazing, with a
sort of scofl&ng air, at her finery and gene-
ral costume.

" We need not stay here, dear Lady
Seaman," she whispered. "Do let us go."

" Come, Seaman, we'll take you home.
I want to speak to you. Really."

" Oh, never mind dressing, my lord, and
all that," said the Doctor, eagerly. " We
don't stand upon ceremony at our house.
Polly will excuse the wedding garment — I
mean, of course, always excepting on the
grand occasion." And the Doctor and the
young lord roared at this joke, while Cap-
tain Molyneux smiled.

" Oh, you can't dine out to-day," said
his mother; "it's quite rude — not good
manners to your host."

" Oh, nonsense," said he, sulkily. "It
would be worse ill manners to throw over
an engagement. Mrs. Leader has plenty
of the family to entertain."



" I am sure I don't want to stand in the
way of Lord Seaman's movements," said
the Doctor, maliciously, to Mrs. Leader.
" Mrs. Leader knows that in my little hos-
pitality is the only opportunity I have of
securing the pleasure of his company."

The two ladies had to drive away, frus-
trated in their schemes. It looked, indeed,
as though things were turning out ill for
their little plot.

" My dear Mrs. Leader, it is all for your-
self," were the last words of the noble lady
as they drove up the avenue. " If your
husband is indisposed to exert himself, or
allows himself to be laughed at by a low
fellow like that, why, it is not my affair,
but yours. If it were my case I should
settle it off-hand, and not listen to any
more such nonsense. If my husband were
afraid to act for the interest of the family
I should take it on myself"

Mrs. Leader, entering the house, allowed
these words to sink into her soul, and her
compressed lips showed that she had taken
a resolution.

CHAPTER XVII. A SKIRMISH.

Over dinner that day there was quite a
blank solemnity, owing to the late events,
though there ought to have been joy and
good spirits, from the invalid's coming down
for the first time, and joining the family at
dinner. He was gi-eatly changed, with a
wild, shifting look in his eyes, and with a
singular irritation and fretfulness, which
his wife had noticed was growing on him
steadily. Mr. Leader and his companion
came in late, after a most delightful day
and charming expedition ; but at dinner no
one was in a humour to rally him, as per-
haps he wished to be rallied. To him his
wife assumed a stern, offended manner,
which disturbed him not a little, and to
Katey she was specially hostile.

After speaking of their drive, Mrs.
Leader said: "But I suppose we shall
have to give up driving about the place at
all. We cannot be secure an instant from
intrusion."

" I think Mrs. Cecil Leader," said the
guest with affected respect, " might without
difficulty contrive thatj^ou should be saved
from intrusion of this kind. I am sure her
relations would listen to her."

"Are you speaking of my father ?" said
Katey, coldly. She had heard of the adven-
ture before. "I implore you, madam, to leave
that subject alone. It is as painful to me to
hear him attacked, as for you to hear him
defended."



4 [December 3, 1870.]



ALL THE YEAR ROUND.



[Conducted by



The servants were out of the room. The
liostile ladies looked at one another. Lady
Seaman then said :

" Yon see, Mrs. Leader, there are sub-
jects which we are not to talk of at your
own table."

Here Cecil struck in angi^ily. "Well, it
is hard to have her father brought up thus
for abuse. They're always nagging at him
here. I believe she hates the ground he
walks on."

Mrs. Leader looked over at her husband.
"You are privileged as an invalid," she
said.

" Oh, I want no privilege," he said.
"But I think you might let her fa.ther
alone. He's a good fellow, and liked by
every one that knows or meets him. Only
there are special reasons in this house for
running him down."

Mr. Leader, with both ladies looking to
him, now interposed. " Don't say any more,
Cecil. You must consult your mother's
wishes."

" Mother," said the young man, " no,
not quite. There's been very motherly
conduct going on about me."

" He wishes us to leave the room, Mr.
Leader allows me to be spoken of any way,
in my own presence."

Mr. Leader, emboldened perhaps by the



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