Charles Edwin Booth.

Audels answers on automobiles, for owners, operators, repairmen ... including chapters on the storage battery, electric vehicles, motor cycles, overhauling the car, etc. Fully illustrated and indexed online

. (page 1 of 30)
Online LibraryCharles Edwin BoothAudels answers on automobiles, for owners, operators, repairmen ... including chapters on the storage battery, electric vehicles, motor cycles, overhauling the car, etc. Fully illustrated and indexed → online text (page 1 of 30)
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69 68 67 66



45 43 42 41 40



CROSS-SECTIONAL DIAGRAM OF A FOUR-CYLINDER TOURING CAR.



1 — Divided front scat fi)r chauffem.

2 — Throttle lever.

3 — Steering wheel.

4 — Steering pillar.

5 — Brake or clutch lever.

6 — Spark coil.

7 — Spark coil vibrator.

S — Gravity feed (ja-soleiu' liink.

9— Water jacket wall.
!0— C.vlinder wall.
1 1 — Piston.
12 — Piston rinc.
13 — Compression chamber.
14 — Inlet valve
l.'i — Spark plug.
10 — Relief cocT;.
17 — K.vhaust valve.
IS— Mixer.
19 — Intake pipe.
JO — Exhaust pipe.



21 — Engine Bonnet.

22 — Water circulating jjipe.

23 — Water circulating pipe.

24 — Oil pump gear.

25 — Radiator caj).

26 — Water tank.

27— Radiator.

28— .\ir CooUng fan.

29 — Driving chain for fun.

30 — Starting crank.

31 — Water pump.

32 — Forward spring support.

33 — Commutator.

34 — Forward spring.

35 — Tubular front nxle.

36— Spoke.

37— Felloe.

38 — Rim.

39 — Pneumatic tiie.

40 — Oil governor, actuating pump.



41 — Tubular sub-frame of engine.

42 — Oil governor piston.

43 — Reserve oil chamber.

44— Parallel rod end.

45 — Steering rod.

46 — Cam actuating the exhaust valvi

17 — Cam actuating the inlet valve.

48 — Sliding bearing for cam shaft.

49 — Connecting rod end.

50 — Connecting rod.

51— Crank.

52 — Crank shaft of engine.

53 — Fly-wheel.'

54-^Expansion clutch.

55 — Ball bearing for transmission shaft.

56 — Planetary transmission.

57 — Transmission brake drum.

58 — Universal joint.

59 — Exhaust pipe.

60— Brake rod.



61 — Pressure feed pipe for gasolene.

62— Driving shaft.

63 — Muffler.

04 — Universal joint.

65 — Rear side spring.

66 — Bevel gear driving pinion.

67 — Differential pinion stud.

68 — Differential pinion.

09 — Differential housing.

70 — Main gasolene tank.

71 — Rear spring support.

72— Pressed steel side frannv

73 — Swinging filler for gasolene tank

74— Wooden frame of bod) .

75 — Upholstering.

76 — Upholstering spring.

77 — Aluminum body.

78 — Tonneau.

79 — Side entrance door.




THE KNIGHT SLIDING SLEEVE VALVE ENGINE.

This engine, as shown above, is of the four cycle type with 4| by 5^ cylind-
ers, cast m pairs. The A. L. A. M. rating is 38 horse power, or as cla med by
the builders. 70 to 85 horse power.

th. ^^^^""'f^ ^"Sine has in place of poppet valves two sliding telescopic sleeves-
the e contain the ports and perform the valve duties, being driven by short cot
necting rods from a half speed shaft at the side.

In operation, the right hand ports of the sleeves register with each other on
the suction stroke, exposing a large opening through which the charge of fuel
mixture enters; at the beginning of the compression stroke, the sleeves slide one
up and one down, thus closing the ports for compression.

All ports remain closed until the end of the power stroke, when the left
hand ports open and register with each other, leaving a large exit for the exhaust
of the burnt gases.



The advantages claimed for this valve gear are large port openings and
noiseless operation; the above cut illustrates the Columbia design of the Knight






The Thought is in the Question; the Information is in the Answer.



Au^clS'



. AisigWER S




ON



AUTOMOBILES

FOR

Owners — Operators — Repairmen



RELATING TO

The parts, operation, care, management, road driving, carburetters, wiring, timing, ignition,

motor troubles, lubrication, tires, etc., including chapters on the storage battery,

electric vehicles, motor cycles, overhauling the ca', etc.

Fully illustrated and indexed.

BY

GIDEON HARRIS and Associates




THEO. AUDEL & CO.. PUBLISHERS

7 Imperial Arcade, London 63 Fifth Ave.. New York

19 12



TL .
37



Cop)Aright,j 1911
by ^-
THEO. AUDEIv & CO.. NEW YORK



Entered
Stationers Hall, London



Printed in IT. S.




CONTROL



A — Gear changing hand lever ;
B — Friction clutch foot lever ;
C — Ignition and throttle control

operating lever sector;
D — Ignition and throttle control

operating lever sector bolt ;
K — Ignition and throttle control

operating lever sector bolt ;
F — Rear wheel brake hand lever ;
G — Gear changing hand lever gate ;



H — Rear wheel brake foot lever ;
I — Gear changing hand lever

lock rod head ;
J — Oiler dash sight feed ;
K — Accelerator foot lever ;
L— Coil ;
M — Cylinder compression relief

operating rod handle ;
S — Spark control operatinglever ;
T — Throttle control operating

lever^



I4337S



FOREWORD



FOREWORD



The Thought is in the Question; the Information is in the
Answer,

Now, the Teacher possesses information which he is
more than wilhng to communicate to the pupil ; the former's
fund of knowledge we may suppose is derived from per-
sons, books, and observation; he knows the exact rules that
govern the Mechanic Arts; these relate always to things
to be done; he also, it may be assumed, is familiar with the
broad collection of Industrial Facts which, when arranged
and rightly ordered, have become known as an important
part of Science.

Against and over this array of accomplishments of the
Teacher, stands the expectant Scholar with his mind a
blank or dimly illumined.

The problem is, in its first stage one of transferrence,
in which the Scholar asks a question relating to the problem
to be made clear, and the Teacher rephes with an inform-
ing Answer.



FOREWORD



The communication has been made by a question and
an Answer. These being followed by a repeated exercise
of similar import, have completed the mental achieve-
ment, and there are two persons instead of one who pos
sess — let it be said — the desired secret of the Art. Hence :

There must, in similar cases, perforce be: i, an Inform-
ing (and willing) mind, and 2, a Receptive mind, which is
able and anxious to acquire. The first is often, it may prop-
erly be said, made willing by a Fee, and the second also
animated by the hope of future reward, as of Wages.

The ideas now advanced, it may be explained, are
confined mainly to the Mechanic Arts, whose secrets are
handed down from generation to generation.



PREFACE



PREFACE



There are no hard and fast rules which can be laid down
to insure a person becoming proficient in driving an auto-
mobile. Some people have the erroneous idea that only
those who have received a first class mechanical training
can become good operators.

A man who is a first class horseman will usually make a
first class driver of an automobile, or, in other words, the
man who shows mercy to his beast will show mercy to his
car. This type of driver does not belong to that class gen-
erally found at the side of the road with something broken
or out of order. An automobile, if properly designed, will
withstand a great deal of rough usage, but there is bound to
come a time, sooner or later, when it will rebel at being used
like a battering ram.

The automobile is a machine, which involves the con-
sideration of an extensive range of facts in several widely
separated departments of mechanical knowledge, hence the
study of its construction and operation is a liberal education
in itself. Like any other piece of machinery, it requires
attention, care, and intelHgent handling. If the highest
degree of elTiciency be desired, the operator should spend a
little time each day going over the machine to see that it is
well lubricated, and the necessary adjustments properlv
made, also that the whole car is in working order.



PREFACE



The object of this book is to give, in a form so simple
and concise that anyone can easily understand it, the in-
formation necessary for the proper operation, care, and
maintainance of an automobile.

In order to successfully run a gas engine, it is of prime
importance that the operator understand the principles of
carburetters and ignition. With this in view the author has
given considerable space to these subjects, which should
receive careful attention before reading the instructions on
engine operation

In order to adapt the book to the use of students, the
subject matter is presented in the form of questions and
answers; where technical terms are used they are either
explained or made clear by the wording of the answer. In
order not to divert the mind and confuse the reader, the
answer is always made short and direct, giving simply the
information demanded by the question.

Detailed explanations, or items of secondary importance, are
printed in small type in separate paragraphs, hence, on first read-
ing, the student may, if he desire, omit these paragraphs in order
to more quickly grasp the VITALS of the subject, and afterwards
enlarge the knowledge thus acquired by a complete reading of
the book.

To aid the reader in quickly finding any desired infor-
mation, the book has been thoroughly indexed, each item
being entered under every possible heading.



TABLE OF CONTENTS



TABLE OF CONTENTS



INTRODUCTORY ^ i— 16

Foreword — preface — table of contents — index



Online LibraryCharles Edwin BoothAudels answers on automobiles, for owners, operators, repairmen ... including chapters on the storage battery, electric vehicles, motor cycles, overhauling the car, etc. Fully illustrated and indexed → online text (page 1 of 30)