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and the healer, 187.— Jesus withdraws from the public, 189.— Heals a paralytic, LS9. —Importance
of a word, 190.— An awful claim, 19U— Call of Matthew, 191.— Matthew's feast, 192— John's dis-
ciples object, 193 The Old and the New, 194.— Illustrations, 195.— Jesus the dividing line of his-
tory, 196.

PAKT IV.

FROM THE SECOND UNTIL THE THIRD PASSOVER IN THE PUBLIC MINISTRY

OF JESUS.
[From A.D. 2S to A.D. 29. One year.']

CHAPTER I.

THE SABBATH QUESTION.

The House of Outpouring, 198.— The impotent man, 200. — Cured on the Sabbath, 200.— The Sabbath
before Moses, 201.— The Sabbath in the Decalogue, 202. — Its lessons, 203.— Pharisaic exactions,

204.— Jesus never broke the Sabbath law, 205.— His reply to accusations, 200. —Remarkable dis-
course, 200.— Jesus no egotist, 209.— The battle begun, 210.

CHAPTER II.

THE SABBATH QUESTION AGAIN.

The disciples in the grain-field, 211 The example of David, 211.— Example of the priests, 212.—

Key to the Sabbath-idea, 212. — The battle continued, 213. — Question of healing on the Sabbath,
213. — A counter-question, 214. — An ad hominem question, 215. — The cure of the withered hand,
215. — The Hcrodiaus, 216. — Crowds follow Jesus, 216. — A movable pulpit, 217.

CHAPTER III.

THE TWELVE.

A crisis, 218.— Selection of the twelve, 219.— Simon I., or Peter, 219.— Andrew, 221.— James I., 222.—
John, 223.— Philip, 225.— Nathanael, 226.— Levi, or Matthew, 227.— Thomas, 227.— James II.,
228.- Ju. I i- [., 230.— Simon II., 231.— Judas II. (Iscariot), 232.— "The Twelve," 235.— Whythis

number, 235. — Their order, 236. — Types, 2.17. — Nothing of tho "church" idea 239.

CHAPTER IV.

Till*. SHIMON ON' THE MOUNT.

Place of delivery. 241.— Reports by Matthew and Luke, 242.— The time, 245.— The Text: C/iaracter,
215. — Tin; Beatitudes: Element* of lofty character, 248. — The poor in spirit. 248. — Those who
mourn. 251 —The meek, 252.- Those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, 254. — The merci-
ful, :.'.")">. — The pure in heart, 256. — The peace-makers, 258. — The persecuted, 259. — The reviled,
•Value of a lofty character, 261. — Jeroa tin- completer of the law, 263.— Refutation of
Pharisaic errors, 266.— Of murder, 266.— Of adultery, 271.— Of divorce, - JT'J.
273. — < If revenge, 274. — Love a in I hatred, ~T7. — Direc cions for thj

— Alms-giving. 281. — Prayer, 282. — "Tho Lord's Prayer," 284, I 292. — fasting, 293. —

Warnings: Against covetuusness, 291. — Against doublc-mindcdness, 294. — Against excessive
anxiety. 295. — Against harsh judgments, 29. t. — Against doubting Cod, 301. — Against the broad
way, 301. Against hypocrisy, 303. — Conclusion: The safe foundation of character, 804. — The
manner of Jesus, 305.

CHAPTER V.

IN CAPERNAUM AND NAIN.

servant, 807. — Tho centurion's humility, 808, — Tesns aamlrcs him, 808. — The ;orvnnt

ed, 809.— In Nain, 309. — resus raises tho d id 111 3 tin hen Jesus, 812.—

His message to Jesus and reply, 812.— Defence or John by Jesus, 313. — Relative estimate of John,

31-1. — Both John and .1. i -Jesus dines with a Pharisee and is anointed by a

woniun, 317. — The delicacy of Je.siis, 818.

CHAPTER VI.

THE SECOND TOU1! OF CM. II. ii: ami RETURN TO CAPEBXAUM.

Accompanied by women; 820 820, Harj Magdalene, 321.— Her devotion to

The mo i beautiful * i lern mm, 824 Thi 824, -Phari-

saic ■ rgo thai Jesus has n denv

is more powerful than Satan, ' : Jonah,

-A woman's compliment, ind her son . ■ cats with a Pharisee and

dene ii in, 334. \ "law ngalnsl hypocrisy, 887.— Parable ol tho

rich fool, 837. — One of Pilate's outrages, 841. — Parable of the i ,



XVI CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VII.

A CHAPTER OF PARABLES.

Parable of the sower, 345. — Of the tares, 340. — Of the patient farmer, 340. — Of the mustard Reed, 34Q
— Of the leaven, 847. — Explication of the parable uf the sower, 349. — Of the putient farmer, 355
—Of [he mustard -seed. 350. — Of the leaven. 357. — Similitudes, 357. — The treasure in the Uekl
357. — The pearl-buyer, 358. — The drag-net, 359,

CHAPTER VIII.

A CHAPTER OF MIRACLES.

Jesus had no politics, 361. — A political follower, 3fil'. — A hard saying, S(!2. — Its difficulty, £63. — Iti
lesson, 363. — Another lesson. 804. — Storm on the lake, 304.— Jesus stills tin' storm. £65. — Gadara,
8(15. The demoniac, 307. — The .-.wine, 80S.— In Capernaum, 37U. — lairus, 371. — The woman with
the hemorrhage, 371. — Is healed in touching Jesus, 371. — Death of Jairus'S daughter, 372.— JcRUfi

res I lie daughter of Jairus to life. 373. — Two blind men restored, 315. — Jesus, cures a dumb de-
moniac, 375. — In Nazareth, 377. — Again rejected by his own people, 377.

CHAPTER IX

THE THIRD TOUR OF GALILEE AND RETURN TO CAPERNAUM.

In Galilee, .379. — A missionary movement, 370. — Address of Jesus, 880. — The route of the twelve, 381.
— The home-altar, 3S2. — A warning, 382. — A consolation, 383. — The gospel to he a discrimination,
3S4.— A frightful ligure, 385.— A great step forward, 885.— John Baptist beheaded, 885.— Herod
hears of Jesus. 3S(>. — Return of the twelve. 38(1. — Miraculous feeding of live thousand, 388. —
Storm on the lake, 390. — Jesus walking on the waters, 3111. — Progrossivenoss of Jesus, 893. — In-
tense excitement, 393. — The bread-seekers, 394. — They demand a sign, 3'J5. — Jesus again offends
the Pharisees, 390. — Their puzzle, 397. — Jesus sifts his followers, 398.

PART V.

PROM THE THIRD PASSOVER TO THE ENSUING FEAST OF TABERNACLES.
[From April to October, A.D. 29. Six mo/U/ta.]

CHAPTER I.

UNSETTLED.

Tradition, 399. — Jesus rebukes the Pharisees, -RIO. — What defiles a man, 401. — In Phoenicia, 402. —

dtes holy wit, 406.— The Deeapolis, 406. — Cure
of the deaf stammerer, 408.— Healing. 409.— Feeding of four thousand, 409.— Dahnamitha, 410.—
A sign demanded, -111. — Addressed to weather prophets, 412.— The leaven of the Pharisees, 413. —
Bethsaida, 413.

CHAPTER II.

THE GREAT CONFESSION.

Cresarea Philippi, 415. — Another crisis, -115. — Not struck root, 410. — Peter's solemn confess! in, 117. —
Jesus receives Messianic homage, -117. — Address of Jesus to Peter, 418. — The word "chun h." 490.
—His "congregation," 420. — The power of the keys. 421. — Jesus controls history. 428. — He pre-
dicts his resurrection, 424. — Rebukes Peter, 424. — Address to his disciples, 425. — Its meaning, 425.

CHAPTER III.

THE TRANSFIGURATION.

■ by the Evangelists. 427. — Why Elijah must first come, 428. — Site of the transfiguration, -128.
— Peter's conjecture, 129.— The voice, 429. — lnlluence on the disciples, 430. — A perplexity,

Another perplexity, 430. — Region of Gesarea Philippi, 431. — The demoniac boy, 432.— Jesus heala
him, 433.

CHAPTER IV.

LAST DAYS IN GALILEE.

h Northern Galilee, 435. — The Temple-tax, -130. — A miracle of knowledge, 437. — Messianic
hopes, 43,s. — The rule of precedence, 438. — John's frank confession, 439.— Schism. 440. — •■ If two
agree," 441. — Idea of a true ehtireh. 442. Parable of the unmerciful servant, 442. — The -
of the Sevcuty, 444. — Inhospitable Samaritan village, 440.

PART VI.

FROM THE FEAST OP TABERNACLES UNTIL THE LAST PASSOVER WEEK.

[From October. A.D. 29, to April, A.D. 30. Six Jtuitlhu.]

CHAPTER I.

AT THE FEAST OF TAliEENACLES.

The Feast of Tabernacles. 447.— Evening service, 1 18.— Supplemental festival, 449. — Jesus at the feast,
419.— His defensive speech, 45U. — He attacks his enemies, 451.— Asserts his heavenly origin, 452.



CONTENTS. Xvii

— An alarming speech, 453. — The great day of the feast, 154. — The fountain of Siloam, 454.—
They cannot arrest Jesus, 455. — In the treasury. 45(i. — The woman taken in adultery, 456.— ■
Caught in their own trap, 457. — Conflict of Jesus with his enemies, 457.— Jesus more deeply in-
censes his enemies, 400. — Jesus charged with having a demon, 401. — His reply, 402. — Jesus before
Abraham, 402.

CHAPTER II.

THE FEAST OF DEDICATION.

Near Jericho, 463.— Parable of the Good Samaritan. 404. — From Jem =alem to Jericho, 465.— Bi
Mary and Martha. 466.— Reply of Jesus to Martha. 467.— The blind man, 46!).— Existence o
409. — The ancient pagan idea. 470.— The Hebrew idea, 470.— "Who did sin?" 471. — What Jesu^
thought of it, 472. — Manner of the healing, 473.— Healed on the Sabbath, 473. — The patient and
his parents examined, 474. — Jesus meets him, 477. — Discourse of the shepherd and the sheep, ITS.
— Division among his enemies, 479. — A challenge, 480. — Exalted claims, 480.

CHAPTER III.

IN PEKEA.

Bethany, east of Jordan, 482. — Jesus visits the place of his baptism, 4S2. — The dropsical man, 48-1. —
Parable of the Great Supper, 485. — Terms of discipleship, 480. — Parable of the Lost Sheep, 487. —
Of the Lost Coin, 487.— Of the Prodigal Son, 487.— Of the Unjust Steward. 489.— Meaning of the
para I ile, 48'.). — Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus, 491. — Prayers to saints. 493. — Of o1
and forgiveness. 404. — A prayer for faith, 494. — Sickness and death of Lazarus, 405. — Devotion
of Thomas, 497.

CHAPTER IV.

JESUS ON HIS LAST CIRCUIT.

Bethany, near Jerusalem. 498. — Jesus claims to be The Resurrection, 500. — Mary and Jesus, 501. —
grief of Jesus. 502. — At the grave. 503. — Lazarus raised from tho dead, 504. — The Sanhedrim,
505. — Acknowledge his mirai les, 51 5. Hcjecl him as Messiah, 506.— Caiaphas, 506. — His prophecy,
507. — Ephron, 507.— Ten lepers healed, 509.— The Purnwtiaof the Son of Man, 511. — Parable of
the Unjust Judge. 512. — lt> lesson. 51 ! ncy of Jesus, 514.— Parable of the Pharisee and

Publican, 514. — Pinal departure fiom Galilee, 510. — Divorce, 510. — Mosaic law of divorce, 517. —
True law of divorce. 5,20.

CHAPTER V.

GOING TO JERUSALEM.

Jesus blesses little children. 523. — The rich ruler, 524. — " Who can be saved ? '* 527. — The PaUilf/eJie-fia,

528. -Parable of the laborers, 528. The lesson. 530. — A third warning, 530. — The ambitions

tiers, 532. — The blind men. 533. — Blind B ' is, 537.

-His conversion. 538. — Parable ol the pot nds, 539. — Bethany: House of Lazarus, 541. — Crowds

Cock to see Jesus, 512. — His last Sabbath, 5 12.

PART VII.

THE LAST WEEK.

[From April 2 to April 8, A.D. 30.]

CHAPTER I.

THE FIRST DAT.

Palm-Sunday, 543.— Jesus riding, 544. — Great excitement, 545. — "The church" 546. —

In sight of Jerusalem. 5 17. — resits apostrophizes Jerusalem, 548. — Entering the city and the

Temple, 54S. — Greeks seek him, 549. — The Dath-Kol, 550. — What was it'.- 551. — Jesus knew it, 552.

I'll \PTICR II.

TUB SECOND HAT.

oi the narrative. 555. — A great lesson, 550. — A grand truth.
557. — The second cleansing of the Temple, 557. — Fine discriminations, 558, — An act >\

CHAPTER III.

TIIK 1 Until DAT.

" Jy what authority?' 1 .101. — A counter-dilemma, 56 ! he Two

4._r

505. — Without the wedd
An adroit question, 570

reply \\ David's

I with the "

Jesus melt . — P oablo

— General judgment of man!.. t

dogmu. ism, .V.rj.



XV111 CONTENTS.



CHAPTER IV.

THE FOURTH DAY.



Disappointed hopes, 00(1. — Feast in Pinion's house, 600. — Mary anoints Jesus, 000. — Judas objects, (501.
— Reply of Jesus, 601. — A meeting of conspirators, (it)".'. — The capture postponed, 002. — Judas cornel
to them, 003.— The case ol Judas, 608. — Fresh examination, 0U4-011.

CHAPTER V.

THE FIFTH DAY.

The first day of unleavened bread, G13. — Preparations for the Paschal Supper, 014. — At whose house,
014. — Between the evenings, 015.

CHAPTER VI.

THE SIXTH DAY.

Sec. 1. The Sutpeb. Jesus's opening speech, 010. — Washes their feet, 017. — Peter's refusal, 017. —
The lesson, 018. — Sad prediction, 6l9.— Self-inspection, 619. — Judas leaves, (W0. — l'cter puzzled,
(W0. — Consoling words, 632. — Philip's materialism, 628. — Thaddeus perplexed, 624.

Sec. 2. The Valedictory and Last Prayee. The Hallel. 624. — An out door discourse, 625. —
A pause, 626. — Disciples express belief, 627.— The la i prayer with the disciples, 627.

Sec :;. Gethsemane. The Kedron valley. 628. — In the garden, 630.— Solitary prayer, 680. — A horror,
6S0. — The sweat of blooil, 631.— The betrayal, 631. — Jewish criminal law, ('>•,"..'. at, KM

— Irregularities, 633. — The signal. 634.— The arrest, 634. — Peter's zeal, 635.— Forsaki n, K 5.

Sec. 4. The Trial. 636. Fresh outrage, 636. — Annas, 636. — Caiaphas, 0-'i7. — Reply of Jesns, 038.—
Peter, 638. — His denials, 637-64C— Daybreak, 0-11. — False witnesses, 0-11. — Jesus put on oath, 642
— The judge in a rage, 043. — Intense excitement Oil.

Sec. 5. Pilate. The Procurator, (ill.— The jn.s gladii, (ill. — To Pilato. 015. — Play of passions, 0-15
— A halt, 046.— Change of ground, 047.— In the pnetorium, 046.— Jesus replies to Pilate, 649. —
A contrast, 050.

Sec. 0. Herod. Herod and Jesus, 650. — Herod and Pilate, 051. — Jesus sent to Herod, 651.— Jesna
i bless, 652.

See. 7. Pack to Pilate. Pilate and the Sanhedrim, 652. —The people against Jesus, 653.— Barabbas,
054. — Pilate's wife's dream, 054. — The unstable people, 055. — Pilate washes his hand-. 656
scourged and mocked, 656. — Pilate in trouble, 057. — " Ecce Homo ! " 057. — Pilate seeks to release
Jesus, 05S. — "Cajsar's Friend," 059.— A dying nationality, 660. — The sentence, 660.

Sec. 8. The last of Judas. His hopes and fears, 660.— The ground gives way. 001.— He returns to
the priests, 001. — They regard him a fool, 662. — He flings the money away, 662. — rotter's Field, 663.

Sec. 9. Going to Calvary. Bearing the cross, 663. — The Cyrenian, 663. — Form of the cross, 664. -
Daughters of Jerusalem, 004. — Jesus prophesies, 665. — Golgotha. 005. — The sour wine, 000.

Sec. 10. From Nine o'clock till Noon. Jesus prays for his tormentors, 667. — The scamli

ment, 007. — The epigraph, 00s. — Caesar's verdict, Otis. — Jesus reviled. 009. — The impenitent thief,
009. —The penitent thief. 070. — Jesus accepts him, 071. — Near noon, 671.— His mother. 672.

Sec. 11. From Noon until Three o'clock. Noon and darkness, 673.— The cry, 074.— A mys-
tery, 674. — The light returns, 075. — Jesus thirsts and dies, 070. — An earthquake, 070. — The cen-
turion, 070.

Sec. 12. From Three o'clock until Evening. A ritualistic difficulty, 677.— The thieves killed, 078.
— The spear-thrust. 078. — Physical causes of death of Jesus. 079. — What was his agony? Os-'J.—
Joseph and Nicodcmus, 684. — Secret disciples, 084. — In a garden, 085.— Love's last vigil, 085.

PART VIII.

RESURRECTION OF JESUS AND SUBSEQUENT EVENTS.
[Forty Days. From April 9 to May 19, A. I). 30.]

I. The Sabbath after crucifixion, 0S0.— The sepulchre guarded. 687.— Preparations for embalming,

087.— A vision in the sepulchre, 0ss._ A message to Peter. 688. — John and Peter, 6S9.— Mary of
Magdala see- Jesus, 690.— Her obedience, 690. — The other women, 691. — The watch, 691. — The
Sanhedrim, 001. — The conspiracy, 692.— On the way to Enimaus, 693. — Jesus reveals himself, 695.
— He appears to Peter, 696. — First assembly of the disciples, 697. — Jesus in their midst, 6!I7. — The
Holy Spirit. 698.— Absolution, 698.— Thomas incredulous, 699. — Th

II. The Apostles in Galilee, 700.— Jesus by the lake, 701.— Peter's ordeal, 702.— A prediction, 703.—
John, 703.

III. Tabor, 704. — " Five hundred brethren at once," 704. 05.— The commission,

The last recorded word, 705. — Jesus's concept of God, 706.- All restrictions removed, 700.
— A universal religion, 7u7. — A claim and a prediction, 707. — The fulfilment, 7UT.

IV. The Ascension, 709.

APPF.NDICE8.

Chronology of the Birth of Jesus. 711.— Capernaum, 711.— Addition to note on page 189, 7)1.—.
Blavi 711.— Mary of Magdala, 712.— A translation explained, 712.— Discipline, 7P2.

The woman taken in adultery, 7KI.- Bethany = I'.ethabur.i, 713. — Translation of .Matt lew xxiv.
10, 713. — Physical cause of the death of Jesus, 713.

Description of Illustrations, 729.



WHO WAS JESUS ?



PART I.
THE BIRTH AND CHILDHOOD OF JESUS

FROM B.C. 6 TO A.D. 8— ABOUT THIRTEEN YEARS AND A HALF.



CHAPTER I.



PRELIMINARY EVENTS.



In the reign of Herod the Great, in Judca, lived Zacharias and
Elizabeth. They were of priestly descent and of great age, were
childless and without hope of children. Their
rives had been blameless. Their family, their
employment, and their character gave them an air of sanctity.
Zacharias was of the course of Abia. being the eighth of the
twenty-four courses established by David. (1 Chron. xxiv. 10.)

One day, in the order of his course, according to the custom
of the priest's oflice, his lot was to burn incense when he went
into the temple of Jehovah. While engaged in this solemn act,
he beheld an apparition standing on the right side of the altar of
incense. The sight troubled Zacharias. Luke says it was an
angel, and that Zacharias was told by the angel that bis Dame

was Gabriel. This is the name of the man whom Daniel had

I",



1C



THE BIRTH AND CITILDUOOD OF JESUS.



seen in a vision, and from whom he learned the time when the
Messiah should appear. (Daniel ix. 21-1^. Gabriel = Man i
God.) Gabriel predicted to Zacharias that Eliza-
Birth of John \jQfa should bear a son, whose name should be
announced. v .. TT .

called John (in Hebrew, Jehoanan, meaning tlie
gift of Jehovah, equivalent to Theodore); that he should drink
neither wine nor strong drink (Numbers vi. 1-21), but that he
should be rilled with the Holy Ghost, and have the power and
office of Elias, namely, to go before the Lord and turn the hearts
of the fathers to the children, and to make the people ready for
the Lord, as Malachi had predicted in the last words of the Old
Testament. Zacharias, being incredulous, asked a sign of Gabriel.
It was given. He was to be dumb until the birth of his child.

While this was going on, the whole congregation — at this time
i ^usually large — were silently praying in the outer court. The
people wondered at the tarrying of Zacharias. When he came
forth he could not speak. From his solemn manner and speech-
lessness the people concluded that he had seen a vision. They
were then in expectation of the Messiah.

Zacharias finished his week's work and departed to his own
house, which was probably in Hebron, or Juttah. There Eliza-
beth conceived, and hid herself five months, saying, " Thus hath
Jehovah dealt with me, in the days wherein He looked on me, to
take away my reproach among men." As a Deliverer was always
looked for, the highest desire of a Hebrew bride, in the line of
David, was to become a mother — if perhaps it might be, mother of
the great Expected King. Barrenness, therefore, was a reproach.

While Elizabeth was quietly awaiting her time in the hill coun-
try of Judea, another wonder occurred in the obscure little city
of Nazareth, in the heart of Galilee of the Gen-
ary " tiles, far from the splendid temple where Zacha-

rias had beheld his vision. In that remote place dwelt a simple
Hebrew maiden, whose name was Mary. She was poor. Hei
society was that of the common work-people. She was betrothed
to a kinsman, a carpenter,* named Joseph. But royal blood ran



* The word translated "carpenter"
means any worker in wood, builder of
houses or of ships, or maker of wooden
furniture. We know that Joseph was
not a ship -builder. It is not probable



that he was a house-builder, because of
the scarcity of wood and the custom of
building stone houses. He was probably
a maker or mender of furniture. It has
beeu sufrjrested that he was an architect.



PRELIMINARY EVENTS. 17

through her veins, and the gifted King David was her ancestor.
So great, however, had been the decline of her people, that even
the race of Jewish kings had failed to keep so accurate an account
of their genealogy as to save historians from great perplexity.

Two tables of genealogy have been preserved — one in the bio-
graphical sketch by Matthew, and another in that by Luke. It is
noticed that both trace the descent of Joseph
rather than of Mary, for whom it is specially M
necessary to make a descent from David, seeing
that her wonderful Son is reputed to have had no earthly father.
But if Mary was the daughter of Jacob, as has been supposed,
she was the first cousin of Joseph, so that a table of his genealogy
is in fact, if not in form, a table of Mary's.

These two tables present very grave difficulties, but not per-
haps insurmountable. Matthew says that Joseph was the son of
Jacob ; Luke says that he was the son of Ileli. The former pre-
serves the genealogy of Joseph as legal successor to the throne of
David, the latter his, private genealogy, showing his real birth as a
descendant of David. Jacob and Ileli might both have been sons
of Matthan, who was thus grandfather to both Joseph and Mary.
Jacob might have been Mary's father, as was generally supposed.
and Ileli Joseph's father. Or, Mary might have been Matthan's
granddaughter by her mother, whose name has not been pre-
served. This latter is asserted to have been the fact by Hippo-
lytus of Thebes, in the 10th century; but his statement pmbably
rested upon tradition, the value of which we cannot now ascertain.
But if it were true, then Jacob might really have had no son, and
Matthew gave his name as Matthan's eldest son, because Matthew
was making a list of successive heirs to the throne, not of succes-
sive progenitors, the latter being the work of Luke.

If we compare Luke's personal table with Matthew's official
table of genealogy, we find that the lineal descent was broken in
Jechonias (Matt. i. 12), who could not have been Literally the
father of Salathiel, as he is declared childless in Jeremiah xxii.
30. It is clear from tins that Matthew could have been eivins
only the names of the heirs to the throne. And this simple es
plauation, if applied to Matthew's table, according to the Jewish
law in Numbers xxvii. 8-11, may go far towards dealing up diffi-
culties. Even if, with Dean Alford, we take the ground that the

difficulties created bv the two tables cannot be solved without
2



18



THE BIRTH AND CHILDHOOD OF JESUS.



knowledge which we do not possess, it would not be positive proof
against the general conclusion which the tables undertake to
reach, namely, that Jesus was a descendant of David, because the
writers may have had knowledge which we do not possess, — or
there may have crept some clerical errors into the text, which do
not vitiate the general line.

If even the tables were abandoned, there still remain such ev-
idences as these: (1). The nearly contemporaneous biographies of

~,, ., Jesus, all indeed upon which we base our knowl-

Other evidences. {

edge of him, speak of him as the "Son of Da-
vid.'' He was repeatedly addressed as such, and never declined
the title. Unless we accept it, we are obliged to consider Jesus
an arrant impostor. There can be no middle ground. So great
a man could never, without being a very bad man, be party to
what the gifted M. Eenan mischievously calls " innocent frauds"
a solecism in language and a contradiction in thought,* (2). Paul
was a scrupulous Pharisee. lie knew where to find the records
and how to satisfy himself. In 2 Tim. ii. S he speaks positively
of " Jesus Christ of the seed of David," '«* a-Trtp^xroi Acc/ziS.
(3). " The Emperor Domitian was at first uneasy at this illus-
trious descent, which might lend itself to ambitious or seditious
views, but was reassured on seeing the horny hands of these
children of a king, become common artisans." (De Pressense's
" Jesus Christ," book ii.)



* M. Kenan denies the existence of
the family of David, on such slender
grounds as the following question indi-
cates : "If the family of David still
formed a distinct and well-known group,
how happens it that we never see it
figuring by the side of the Sadokites,
the Boethuses, the Asmoneans, or the
Herods, in the great struggles of the
times?" (Life of Jesus, ch. xv.) That is



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