Charles Frederick Holder.

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producing condition and the land is paid for, when it becomes the individual property of the
subscriber. It is evident that to purchase a large tract of land it may be had on better terms
than a small one ; also that by doing the work on a large scale, under one management, not only
may the cost be brought down much lower than if it were all done under individual ownership
and management, but that more uniform results may be secured ; besides every one knows that
the greatest bar to individual enterprise of this sort is the comparatively large outlay necessary
to begin. The great number of people who live upon a salary and never <;in save enough to un-
dertake the work of procuring such a home is very large, and without such a plan as this they
can never hope to become independent land-owners.



A FEW QUESTIONS ANSWERED.

1. Our tract is from two to five miles from R. R. station.

2. It is two to five miles from Madera and twenty from Fresno.

3. Water rights are a part and parcel of the land and cannot be separated from it.

4. Water for domestic use is found at from 50 to 75 feet (surface water at 10 feet) of the
purest and best quality.

^ 5. The elevation above sea level is 300 feet.

6. It is forty miles to the mountains and only 100 miles to the famous Yosemite Valley, re-
nowned all over the world for its remarkable scenery.

7. Plenty of deer are found in the mountains and foothills, and small game such as quail,
ducks, geese, rabbits, etc., abound in the valley. If you are of the dangerous, yellow-backed
sort, you can receive satisfaction by clambering up high into the mountains and encountering
bruin.

8. The rainy season begins in October and ends in April. It does not rain all the time but
as much as it does in the East during the summer.

9. The climate is fine for consumptives if they come in time for it to help them. Rheuma-
tism, catarrh and kindred troubles are usually helped.

10. Fog is almost unknown here in the summer, and it only occurs in winter during damp
weather during which times it will be foggy in any land.

11. The sea breeze reaches us in the afternoon, blowing from the northwest.

12. The soil of the land we offer is alluvial, deep and strong.

13. Good oak wood is sold at six dollars a cord.

14. Groceries and provisions are a little higher than in the East in some items. Flour and
meat are about the same price.

~ 15. Lumber is worth from $15 for refuse to $35 per M. for best.

16. Wages for farm laborers are $30 per month and board, the man furnishing his own
blankets.

17. There is less danger from earthquakes than there is in the East, and none at all from
lightning, which is seldom seen.

18. Strawberries can be had ten months out of twelve.

19. Good teachers can always find a position. Teachers' wages range from $60 to $125 per
month.

20. All attainable Government land is of rugged nature, not capable of irrigation, far dis-
tant from business centres, and it would require more capital to settle on it than is required for
settlement in close neighborhoods.

21. Our land is entirely level, has no brush, trees nor stones upon it, and is free from alkali.

22. While at Washington and Philadelphia people fall dead in the streets with the ther-
mometer at 90 degrees, in the San Joaquin valley the hay harvest is gathered in absolute safety
with the thermometer at 110 degrees. The exceedingly dry atmosphere promotes rapid evapora-
tion, which works this apparent wonder.

If you desire land in this colony, send the money to Bank of Madera, Treasurer, $300 per
five-acre lot if you wish it planted this winter, otherwise $150 which will secure you the lot and
put it in preparation for planting to the best of advantage next year. Send money by bank
draft. Do not send personal checks as it costs exchange to collect them.

List of colonists and references as to our reliability furnished upon request. Address

The John Brown Colony, Madera, California



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NESTLINGS



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£LLA FRASER W£LLER



The Successful Book of the Season.

Beautifully and fully Illustrated.

For Sale by all Booksellers.

Price, §1.50.

SENT POSTPAID DY

The Californian Publishing Co.

47 Lafayette Place

New York




Ttye Ni cara ^^ a G a i> a l

AND

OTHER ESSAYS

BY

Richard H. McDonald, Jr.

Vice-President oe the Pacieic Bank, of San Francisco.



PRESS NOTICES



The articles give ample proof that Mr. McDonald is a
pungent and incisive writer, and, while some cannot agree
with his conclusions, all must admire his style and I In-
masterly use of the English language.— Wasp, San Fran-
cisco.

The essays are very ably written and reflect great credit
on Mr. McDonald. The work is highly commendable and
invaluable to all who wish to be well informed on the
political and economic questions of the day upon which
it treats.— Times, Pleasanton.

One of the clearest and comprehensive reviews of the
Nicaragua Canal is furnished by Richard H. McDonakl,
Jr., and should be read by every American citizen who

has the interests of his country at heart.— Argus. A din.

The work is artistic from a typographical point < & \ icw.
and the subject matter is treated in a terse, scholarly
manner. — Express, Winters.

The writer is undoubtedly a scholarly , but what amounts
to a great deal more, a thinking man. One would sup-
pose that the topics which he discusses had lie.n utterly
exhausted by this time, but all of his essays ares., v.iy
masterfully handled, that they appear decidedly new. t'.»
an attentive reader. Mr. McDonald has the ability to make
even a dry subject interesting reading, and in that respect
he surpasses the many writers on political economy.
Independent, Santa Barbara.

Mr. McDonald holds to a high conception of the duties
of citizenship, and no one can read his lines without being
impressed with the earnestness of Ins purpose. Main
festly these papers are but the beginning of more serious
literary work.— Sun, San Diego.

The essays are not only worth reading, but the subjects
show that they are deserving of careful study and con-
sideration by all interested in political and economic
topics.

"The Nicaragua Canal and Other Essays." by Richard
H. McDonald, Jr., is an intensely interesting work upon
live questions of the day.— Gazette, Los Angeles.

They are essays of great importance and such that
every good citizen should have a copy to read and study
over.— Observer, Corning.

There are no higher class essay on leading public ques-
tions than these. They are not written in a partisan
spirit.— Times, Pomona.

The essays show thought, and are logical presentations
of subjects from a Republican standpoint.— Arqus, Au-
burn.



We earnestly recommend them to our readers for care-
ful perusal.— News, Rio Vista.

Mr. McDonakl is a forcible writer and his essays on the
great questions of the day will be read i>y all who take an
Entered in the advancement and betterment of our politi-
cal, commercial and social usages.— Times, Escondido.

These articles have already appeared in print and at-
tracted much attention on account of the recognized,
ability With which the subjects were p resented. Mr.
McDonald is a thorough student, and the salient points of
the queationfl under discussion arc brought out clearly
and forcibly.— Gazette, Martin.-/.

The contents are masterly essays on important ques-
tions of the day— topics of importance and interest to
every public spirited person OH this coast written by

Richard H. McDonald, Jr., rice-president of the Pacifu

Hank of San 1'rancisc.., and reprinted from previous
numbers of the I'alifornian Magazine.— Ojai, NordholT.

Those who Are at all familiar with Mr. McDonalds
method of grappUng with these important problems wffl
hail the appearance of tl w it li delight. They

are admirably written and get at the root of the matter
with charming distinct; F.ra, Monterey.

Mr. McDonald is ■ constant student, thinker and writer
upon the great questions of" the day. In speaking of the
writings embraced In this volume, he says: "If they aid
in establishing better standards in political, commercial
and social usage, in influencing any citizen to take a
tinner stand for all that is good and right in public, then
the purpose of the writer will have been served."— Appeal,
Marysville.

Richard H. McDonald, Jr., vice-president of the Pacific
Hank of San Francisco, has during the past tew months
contributed to the Odafomian a number of interesting
and scholarly articles on the Nicaragua Canal and other
political and economic topics.— New Era, Benicia.

These essays, besides discussing the Nicaragua Canal,
cover quite a range of economic subjects, the topics
being "Is Labor in Danger* 11 "Regulation of Railway
Charges, 11 " How to Secure Good Municipal Government."
"Political Duty of Californians. 11 "Our Commercial
Urowth and the Tariff, 11 from both a Republican and
Democratic standpoint: " Ballot Reform 11 and "The
Danger to the Republic. 11 There is much matter in the
pamphlet for thoughtful people to consider.— Times, Los
Angeles.



PUBLISHED BY THE



CALIFORNIAN PUBLISHING CO.



No. 916 Market Street.
For Sale Iby all Booksellers



Price, 30 Cents.



•^ ^ ^g"~ M iSC EL L A N EOUS H I I l I" ;r lfs*

SPECIAL OFFER TO SUBSCRIBERS



If you will renew your subscription direct to main office we will send you, postage
paid, any one of the following books:

The Nicaragua Canal, and Other Essays, by Richard H. McDonald, Jr., one of

the most valuable books now on sale and of interest to all loyal Americans.

Uncle Tom's Cabin, by Harriet Beecker Stowk.

Scarlet Letter, by Nathaniel Hawthorne.

Barriers Burned Away, by E. P. Roe. Or we will bind free in cloth and gold, one
volume (six months) of the Californian, you furnishing the parts!

Our terms are $3.00 per year, in advance.

Very respectfully,

The Californian Illustrated Magazine

47 Lafayette Place, New York City



A NEW BOOK

* * BY * *

Charles Frederick: Holder, LIv.D.

EDITOR OF THE CALIFORNIAN

Along the Florida Reef

D. KPPLETON St CO.. NEW YORK, PUBLISHERS



PRESS NOTICES



'Dr. Holder has written a perfectly fascinating account "The story is a charming one of out-door life."—

hard to lay down when once begun. "'— The Critic. Rochester Post.

"This is abook todelight . . . Mr. Holder has a charm- "A volume we are glad to commend as captivating. 1 '

ing knack of making his facts take on all the romance —Philadelphia Press.

of fiction."— The JV. Y. Independent. " Will at once charm and instruct all who read it."—

"It will be hard to match this volume."— Boston Baltimore American.

Herald. "Those interested in natural history will welcome

"This book will be found of fascinating interest."— this charming volume.'"— Boston Traveller.

Philadelphia Telegraph. "It is one of the best of good books."— Boston Globe.

"Ought to occupy a high place among the few 'best "The text is charmingly interesting."— Chicago

books.' 1 "—Detroit Journal. Inter-Ocean.



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The GAMF0RJ1IAN :




££*«££& illustrated fflaga;

Slope. SHN FRANCISCO, CTL

Do You Wish to Reach the Moneyed People of the

Pacific Slope ?

If so, it will pay you to patronize the Californian Illustrated
Magazine of San Francisco.

The Californian has the largest circulation of any magazine of
the first class published west of New York.

The Californian is seen monthly by over a quarter of million
persons, and is the best advertising medium in Western North
America.

Manufacturers in the East find it the most valuable medium
through which to reach Pacific Coast buyers and consumers.

The Pacific Slope has grown with phenomenal strides within the
last ten years; towns and cities have sprung up like magic, and thou-
sands of happy homes dot the fertile valleys.

The Californian Magazine can be found in most of these homes;
it is the popular home magazine, and the only Illustrated Magazine
that has been accorded rank with the Century, Harper's, Cosmopolitan
and Scribner's, published in Western North America or west of New
York.

The Californian is the leading literary monthly of the West.



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Preferred position next to reading 15 per cent extra

10 per cent discount on contracts for six months

25 per cent discount on contracts for one year

Monthly change of copy allowed on time contracts.

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Online LibraryCharles Frederick HolderThe Californian (Volume 4) → online text (page 120 of 120)