Charles Frederick Holder.

The Californian (Volume 4) online

. (page 2 of 120)
Online LibraryCharles Frederick HolderThe Californian (Volume 4) → online text (page 2 of 120)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


This trip to Alaska is becoming a fad with Eastern people who desire to escape their
hot Bummer weather. Many of the best people of the land may be met on these steamers.
As they are greatly crowded, it is well to secure the passage a few weeks ahead of the time
you wish to go. See The California* for March, May and June, 1892, for beautifully
illustrated articles on the glaciers of Alaska.

The price for the round trip from San Francisco to Alaska, including board < n one
of these fine steamers, is $130.( 0. We will give this round trip ticket as a premium for a
club of 200 yearly subscribers at $3.00 each, or 75 vearly subscribers at $3.00 each and
$80.00 cash, or 50 yearly subscribers at $3.00 each and $110 .00 cash.

Any article in this Premium List may be purchased from us at the retail price, by any
paid up subscriber to the " Calif ornian."



PREMIUM LIST OF CALIFORNIAN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE



No. 351-LOVELL'S DIAMOND SAFETY BICYCLE

Retail Price, *125.00




For Ladies. Loop pattern frame, suspension saddle, cushion tires. Given for 50
annual subscribers at $3.00 each and $70.00 cash, or for 30 annual subscribers at $3.00
each and $80.00 cash. Express charges to be paid by receiver.



No. 353-REMINGTON SAFETY B I C Y C L E-Retaii Price, •i40.»e




High grade, ball bearing, cushion tire3. Strong, handsome, durable.
Given for 70 annual subscribers at $3.00 each and $95.00 cash, or for 40 annual sub-
scribers at $3.00 each and $110.00 cash. Express charges to be paid by receiver.

Any article in this Premium List may be purchased from us at the retail price, by any
paid up subscriber to the " Calif ornian."



0<R^Pffi MISCELLANEOUS WWW ""• Ibo

dorflinqer's
Aherican

Cut Glass.

ff



Combination

Glass and Silver

Candelabra.




No piece genuine
without our trade-mark
label.



C. Dorflinger & Sons



NEW YORK.



Height of Gla



over all 15 inches.



»OOOw*OOG •VX>0OOm*0OOw*OOO'W




SHE CAN BEND ,

No steels to break — no uncomfortableness O
— no sacrifice of grace or figure outline — Q
charming style and absolute >vOOCm*OOC<
comfort and ease of motion — J [[ ^^ ^
And the little one, how rugged
she looks — The strength of pos
terity is regulated by the sense
of the mother — The Equipoise
Waist is sensible. To know
all about it, and where to buy it,
write George Frost Co.,Boston.




BEST DINING CAR SERVICE IN THE WORLD.



A VERY POPULAR TRAIN

on the Chicago, Rock Island and Pacific
Railway leaves Denver, daily, at 8 :oo P. M.
It is called

"THE WORLD'S FAIR SPECIAL"

13 only one day out, and passengers arrive a
Chicago early the second morning.

The "Rock Island" has become a popular
route for East bound Travel, and the train
above referred to is Vestibuled, and carries
the "Rock Island's" excellent Dining Car
Service.

JNO. SEBASTIAN, G. T. & P. A.
Chicago, T\j m
W. H. FIRTH,
Genl A£t. Pass. Dept., Denver.




BUSINESS DTRECTORY







attorney



C R. KING

* • Attorney and Counselor-at-Law
Office 530 California Street, Room 1,
San Francisco, Cal.



EJ. & J. H. MOORE
• Attorneys and Counselors-at-
Law. Nos. 77, 78 and 79 Montgomery
Block, San Francisco, Cal. Telephone
No. 343.



Dentists



D



R. S. E. GOE



210 O'Farrell Street, San Fran-
cisco, Hours from 9 to 5.



D



. ARTHUR T.

REGENSBURGER

Dentist, ii4.Geary SUeet,
San Francisco



Scbools



u



NION ACADEMY



Workman Building, 230^ S.
Spring Street, Los Angeles. Private
Tuition reasonable. We prepare for
Stanford or University of Cal. C. L.
Green, A. B., Principal.



IReal Estate



QLOUGH & BAKER

^ Dealers in Real Estate. 1002
Broadway, bet. 10th and nth Streets,
Oakland, Cal. Property bought, sold
and exchanged. Money to loan.

Houses rented. Telephone 637.



JOHN F. WARD

^ Real Estate Broker. Notary
Public. 1500 Park Street (Tucker
Building), Alameda, Cal.



AN IDEAL STUB PEN-Ester brook's Jackson Stub, No. 442.
A specially EASY WRITER, a GOOD INK HOLDER and a DELIGHT TO
those who use a STUB PEN. ASK YOUR STATIONER FOR THEM. Price,
$1.00 per gross THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEN CO., 26 John St., New York.



JOSEPH GILLOTT'S

STEEL PENS

Iff EXTRA FINE, FINE AND BROAD POINTS
TO SUIT ALL HANDS.

THE MOST PERFECT OP PENS.



■IICC SAYS SHE CANNOT SEE HOW
flllt YOU DO IT FOR THE MONEY
1 O Buys a $65.00 improved Oxford
„ I L Singer Sewing Machine ; perfect
l working, reliable, finely finished, adap-
ted to lif*ht and heavy work, with a com-
plete set of the latest improved attach-
ments free. Each machine guaranteed
*o for 5 years. Buy direct from our factory and sav«
dealera and aerents* profit. Send for Free Catalogue.

OXFORD MFO. COMPANY, CHICAGO, ILL.








PECULATE THE

STOMACH, LIVER AND BOWELS,


PURIFY THE BLOOD.

A RELIABLE REMEDY FOR

Indigestion, Biliousness, Headache, Const!*
potion, Dyspepsia, Chronic Liver Troubles,
Dizziness, Bad Complexion, Dysentery.
Offensive Breath, and all disorders of (he
Stomach, Liver and Bowels.

Ripans Tabules contain nothing injurious to
the most delicate constitution. Pleasant to take,
safe, effectual. Give immediate relief.

Sold by druggists. A trial bottle sent by mail
on receipt of 15 cents. Address

THE RIPANS CHEMICAL CO.

10 SPRUCE STREET, NEW YORK CITY.



•^f^i^i^^ MISCELLANEOUS ^iPI^I 10 lie*




CASTLE GATE, UTAH

ONE OF THE MANY BEAUTIFUL VIEWS ON THE



Hio Grande



"SCENIC LINE or the WORLD"

The R. G. W. R'Y and Connec-
tions is sure to be the Popular
Route to the World's Fair.



For Printed Matter ami Informa-
tion Call on or Write

W. H. SNEDAKER

General Agent
14- MONTGOMERY ST.,

san fran;isco



NESTLINGS



. . POEHS ON CHILDREN

-by-
ELLA FRASER WELLER



The Successful Book of the Season.
Beautifully and fully illustrated.

For Sale by all Booksellers.

Price, $1.50.

Sent Postpaid by

Tbe G*lifornifcD Publfrbiusf (0.

41 I AWK*t Street

San Francisco



NOVELTIES IN

Plants
Seeds
and
Bulbs

ATALOGUE beautifully il-
^^^^® lustrated by life-size
photo-engravings and col-
ored plates, with accurate
descriptions and cultural
directions. Free on appli-
cation to
PITCHER <& MAN DA

SHORT HILLS. N. J.




The Review of Reviews is the Favorite

FROM COAST TO COAST



Some Pacific Coast and "Western Opinions.

" The Review of Reviews is a perfect encyclope-
dia of current literature, presenting in compact
form the most interesting topics that are to be
found in the best publications of the day."—
San Francisco CalL

The Review of Reviews, we do not hesitate to
say, is the best review published for ministers
and others who want all that's going on in a
nutshell."— Southern California Christian Advo-
cate.

The Review of Reviews fills the want which ex-
ceedingly busy people feel who desire to see the
best current literature and want to dodge what
is weak and poor."— Salt Lake City Tribune.

Tf one has only ten minutes every day to read
he can keep thoroughly posted on the events of
the whole world by reading this valuable pub-
lication. Seattle Press - Times.

" The Review of Reviews is not a party magazine.
On the contrary, its independence is absolute.
It gives both sides of all prominent questions,
and tells the truth about the position of the
parties on all great questions. — Portland Ex-
press.

*' The Review of Reuiews is a magazine which is
indispensable to one who wishes to keep up
with life. This library subscribes for a dozen
copies, and never ceases to recommend it to in-
quirers for the one essential journal." — Denver
Public Library Bulletin.

"The greatest magazine published." —
Kearney, Neb., Standard.

" The best publication in the world for those
readers who desire to get the cream of all the
leading magazines."— Grass Valley, Cal., Tid-
ings.

" We take pleasure in calling attention to the
sustained excellence of The Review of Reviews."
—Christian Advocate, Portland, Oregon.



Some Atlantic Coast and Eastern Opinions

" The Review of Reviews holds a place that no
other magazine attempts to approach. By
reading it you can keep thoroughly posted on
the events of the world."— New York Recorder.

" The Review of Reviews is the only monthly
that collects critically and appetizingly the
principal facts of current literature and life ; to
read a number is to resolve to never miss one."
—Boston Globe.

" The Review of Reviews has already become an
invaluable companion of the intelligent,
thoughtful and busy American citizen."— Chris-
tian Union, New York.

" This monthly has become the most interest-
ing of all the magazines." — Worcester Spy.

" The Review of Reviews has become a necessity
with people who have not the time to examine
every periodical. Its editing displays rare
judgment and tact. Among the best articles
appearing from time to time are papers contrib-
uted by its editors, W. T. Stead and Albert
Shaw.— Chicago Herald.

" There is no magazine which quite so closely
tallies with the events of the day as The Review
of Reviews. It is an epitome of nearly every-
thing that is going on."— Boston Herald.

" The Review is full of that wonderful conden-
sation which makes it so acceptable to busy
men." — Christian Inquirer. New York.

" The Review of Reviews is an illustrated news
periodical which is so entertaining that its per-
usal is a pleasure, and so comprehensive that
it answers as a substitute for pretty much every-
thing else."— Detroit Tribune.

" The Review of Reviews is the best and fairest
of all our monthlies." — " Bill Arp " of the Atlan-
tic Constitution.

" There is abundant reason for its popularity
because the magazine presents to its readers
everv month the whole world of social progress
and literary production."— Cleveland Leader.



.50 a Year. Single Copies, 25 cents.



Subscription Price of the Review of Reviews,

SPECIAL SUGGESTION:

Don't you want to see a copy or two ? Among recent numbers of the Review perhaps the most
popular have been: The one containing Mr. Stead's magnificent character sketch of Gladstone;
the one with the extended biographical sketch of Benjamin Harrison, and the one with the sketch
of Grover Cleveland. These three numbers contain— besides numerous fine portraits of Harrison,
Cleveland and Gladstone— new and lifelike portraits of the following interesting and prominent
personages. Whitelaw Reid, William McKinley, Senator Wclcott, Thomas B. Reed, Chauncey
Depew, MatthewS. Quay, John C. New, John J. Ingalls, Mrs. J. Ellen Foster, Lady Carlisle, Miss
Maud Gonne, Count Herbert Bismark and Countess Margaret Hoyos, Signor Giolitti, Thomas Nast,
Charles W. Johnson, Senator Eppa Hunton, the King and Queen of Denmark, Elijah W. Halford,
the late Mrs. Harrison, Adlai E. Stevenson, William C. Whitney, W. Bourke Cochran, Congressman
W r . L. Wilson, Henry Watterson,SenatorVilas, James B. Weaver, James G. Field, Gen. John Bidwell,
Rev. J. B. Cranfill, Andrew Carnegie, Hugh O'Donnell, Governor Pattison, Henry C. Frick, Edward
Blake, Mrs. Henry M. Stanley, Mrs. John A. Logan, Cyrus W. Field, Andrew D. White, Thomas H.
Carter, William F. Harrity, the late Emmons Blaine, Prince Ferdinand of Bulgaria, the late Prof.
Theodore W. Dwight, the Infanta of Spain, Samuel Gompers, George W. Cable, Lord Wolseley, the
late L. L. Polk, Senator Aldrich, President E. Benjamin Andrews, Secretary John W. Noble, Right
Hon. Henry Chaplin, Gen. Horace Porter, the late Edward A, Freeman, Ignatius Donnelly, Prof.
Joseph Le Conte, Miss Kate Field, Prof. Charles 8. Briggs, D.D., the late Alexander Winchell,
Andrew Lang, and dozens of other portraits and pictures.

These three numbers form a BRILLIANT PORTRAIT GALLERY of celebrities.
The regular price of them— very cheap, too — is twenty-five cents each ; seventy-five
cents for the three. In order to acquaint YOU with the Review of Reviews, and
in the hope of securing you as a regular and permanent subscriber, the THREE
will be sent, post-paid, for TEN TWO-CENT STAMPS to those writing before
Christmas Day and mentioning this advertisement.

THE REVIEW OF REVIEWS,

13 Astor Place, New York.




INSURANCE




THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

OF" NEW YORK
RICHARD A. McCURDY, President

Statement for the year ending December 31st, 1892



Assets, $175,084,156 61

Reserve for Policies (American Table 4 Per Cent.)
Miscellaneous Liabilities ....

Surplus ......

Income

Premiums .... $32,047,765 34

Interest, Bents, &c. . . 8,191,099 90 $40,238,865 24



$159,181,067 OO

734,855 67

15,168,233 94



To Policy-Holders

For Expenses and Taxes



Disbursements

$19,386,532 46
7,419,611 08



$26,806,143 54



The Assets are Invested as follows



United States Bonds and other Securities

Loans on Bond and Mortgage, first lien

Loans on Stocks and Bonds

Real Estate ......

Cash in Banks and Trust Companies
Accrued Interest, Deferred Premiums, &c.

Insurance and Annuities

Insurance Assumed and Renewed

Insurance in Force .....

Annuities in Force ....



Increase in Annuities in Force

Increase in Payments to Policy-Holders

Increase in Receipts ....

Increase in Surplus

Increase in Assets ....

Increase in Insurance Assumed and Renewed

Increase in Insurance in Force



$65,820,434 89
. 69,348,092 54
10,394,597 50
. 1 5,638,884 26
7,806,672 55
. 6,075,474 87
$175,084,156 61

$654,909,566 OO

745,780,083 OO

352,036 Ol

$82,732 98

630,820 60

2,604,130 71

3,137,266 78

15,577,017 5)3

47,737,765 OO

50,295,5)25 OO



Note— In accordance with the intention of the Management as announced in November, 1891, to limit the
amount of new insurance actually issued and paid for in the accounts of the year 1892, to One Hundred Million
Dollars, the amount of insurance in force aa above stated includes the amount of such Voluntary limit with but
a slight increase unavoidable in closing the December accounts.

I have carefully examined the foregoing Statement and find the same to be correct

A. N. WATERHOUSE, Auditor

From the Surplus a dividend will be apportioned as usual
BOARD OK TRUSTEES



Samuel D. Babcock
George S. Coe
Richard a. McCurdy
James C. Holden
Hermann C. Von Post
Alexander H. Rice
Lewis May
Oliver Harriman



Henry W. Smith
Robert Olyphant
George F. Baker
Dddley Olcott
Frederic Cromwell
Julien T. Davies
•Robert Sewell
S. Van Rensselaer Cruger
Charles R. Henderson



George Bliss
Rufus W. Peckham

J. HOBART HERRICK

Wm. P. Dixon
Robert A. Granniss
Henry H. Rogers
Jno. W. Auchincloss
Theodore Morford
William Babcock



Stuyvesant Fish
augu8tu8 d. juilliard
Charles E. Miller
Walter R. Gillette
Jambs £. Granniss
David C. Robinson
H. Walter Webb
George G. Haven



ROBERT A. GRANNISS, Vice-President
WALTER R. GILLETTE, General Manager
ISAAC F. LLOYD, 2d Vice-President FREDERICK SCHROEDER, Assistant Secretary

WILLIAM J. EASTON, Secretary HENRY E. DUNCAN, Jr., Cor. Secretary

FREDERIC CROMWELL, Treasurer
JOHN A. FONDA, Assistant Treasurer JAMES TIMPSON. 2d Assistant Treasurer

WILLIAM P. SANDS, Cashier EDWARD P. HOLDEN, Assistant Cashier

EMORY McCLINTOCK, LLD., F.I.A., Actuary
JOHN TATLOCK, Jr., Assistant Actuary CHARLES B. PERRY, 2d Assistant Actuary

WILLIAM G. DAVIES, General Solicitor WILLIAM W. RICHARDS, Comptroller

Medical Directors
GUSTAVUS S. WINSTON, M.D. ELIAS J. MARSH, M.D. GRANVILLE M. WHITE, M.D



For particulars apply to



A. B. FORBES

General Agent, Pacific Coast

401 California Street, S.



■^B' JS ' M M r SCEL LA N'E OOs ^JS"" ;: ]f



WE ARE NEVER DULL:



$3.00 a Year



100 pages.
At News-stands




Sample copy sent on receipt of eight 2-ct. stamps.

Sports Afield Publishing Co., Denver, Colo.



Jume&



Merchant Tailor

1384 Market St., San Francisco

A SELECT LINE OP

Foreign and Domestic Woolens

ALWAYS ON HAND

Workmanship and Fit Guaranteed.

PRICES MODERATE



f miMis fmut mmmM,




c



ALIFORNIA

WIRE WORKS 9



OFFICE
FREMONT STREET

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.



riANUFACTURERS FOR THIRTY-THREE YEARS

WIRE OF ALL KINDS— BEST STEEL

WIRE NAILS

BARBED WIRE, Regularly Licensed

WIRE ROPES and CABLES
WIRE CLOTH and NETTING



worn the



Hallidie's Patent Wire Ropeway

RAPID AND ECONOMICAL TRANSPORTATION OP
ORE AND OTHER MATERIAL ...-•-

Erected by us during the past fourteen years in spans of from 200 to 2,000 feet. .

Simple, Economical and Durable. Have been thoroughly tested in all parte of ttte cswwry

SEND FOR ILLUSTRATED OATALOQUE



LOS AN«KLC« AOENOY

201 N. LOS ANGELES STREET



POHTUIN* A«CNOV

22 FRONT STRUT



^^I^S^^S^S WAJCH CAbbo ^^sN£ 14 &~-

S iw.?.~.v.fl^.v.ft^2S3.P.X?. tt.O^.v.ftrSw.P.^vi / >,



r s< . >v-^- "vr-\ ->;



MMOITE®



£KIP(3(I<§§,



[email protected]<&&0=




Limited===Express===LocaI.

All run on Fahys time, and this is the way

we explain. The thing that keeps the time is the time

keeper. The watch is the time keeper. Yes, but a watch

is a combination of movement and case. The case keeps

the movement going, doesn't it? '1 herefore the true time

keeper is the best watch case in the world and that's a

Fains Monarch 14 karat

Gold Filled Watch Case.

It is stiff, strong, durable,

elegant and guaranteed to

wear 21 years. You will be

proud to show it to your friends. All styles
and sizes. Hunting and open face, jointed and screw.
Look out for this trade mark. "From A to Z of a
Watch Case" (a pamphlet) sent free.



Fahys



#//v/s|4k



TBAUB MVUK..



yoseph Fahys & Co., Nezv York.






sJ$yJ$V3^ys : & 1S








COLUMBIAS



Four Columbia Bicycle Points.



POINT
ONE.



The Double Diamond Frame, supreme in
rigidity, lightness, elegance.



The Band Brake, of ample power and easy control.
It doesn't touch the tire. It can't injure the tire.



POINT
TWO.



POINT
THREE.



The Columbia Pneumatic Tire ; the tire you
are sure of; the tire that is guaranteed.



Always, now, and probably forever, the STAND-
ARD BICYCLE of the world. Absolutely guaranteed.



POINT
FOUR*



You can tell a Columbia by the way it looks and the way it wears.



It grows old beautifully. It wears out slowly




Catalogue
free at Colum-
bia agencies,
by mail for
two two-cent
stamps. Pope
Mfg. Co., Bos-
ton , New
York, Chica-
go, Hartford.





-^



^[SlllSli MISCELLANEOUS" '"WWM"")^

Pears*

What constitutes
fineness in soap? It
is freedom from fat
and alkali* Fat
makes soap dis-
agreeable; alkali
bites, makes tender,
inflames. Pears' has
neither fat nor alkali
in it



!7 and 19 Fremont Street, San Francisco

Saws of Every Description on Hand or

Made to Order

AGENTS FX)R C. B. PAUL'S PILES



£



H O RT- H A N D f*** *>" ££

*»■ _— -•■ •*+ ■ ■-*■ log of Books
ELFTAUGHT and Helps for

seinnstruction, bv BENN PITMAN and
JEROME B. HOWARD, to the Phono-
graphic Institute, Cincinnati, Ohio.



BOYS' SHIRT WAISTS BY MAIL

Send postal note 50c„ 75c. or |1.00, specify lijrht
or dark, blouse or button, and boys' a^e.

THE LONDON CLOTHING CO., Columbus, O.



GOING OUT CAMPING?




^OheHEwYoRKCoNDW



JSSjr



Wjfl bearlh e signature.



sonStreet.Nevi



Pic-nicking, fishing or hunting? If
so, will not fail to appreciate the
advantage of taking along a supply
of the

GAIL BORDEN 'E1GLE' BRAND

Condensed Milk. It is most deli-
cious in coflee, tea, chocolate and
numerous summer drinks. For
30 years the leading brand.
Your Grocer and Druggist sell it.



For tea, coffee and chocolate use undiluted. It's better than cream.




%'

$%



1*






^L '^ <£



V* V \ -o



*



X *\ ^. cP
IP T) * s <>• ^ — -

Q^^ -^ ^ ^ ^ ^ % «






* o 1 ^ 0, % (5,^,^- V 1,%









.0 .




A NIGHT RIDE DOWN MOUNT HAMILTON.
[see page 83.]




The Californian.



Vol. IV.



JUNE, 1893.



No.



YACHTING IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA.*




BY WALTER MAYHEW.

YACHTING season in California may be said to
include the entire year, as beyond a few winter
gales the seasons all call to mind the Eastern
summer. From June to November is the time
of activity, and the famous channel of Santa
Barbara and the blue waters from there to
San Diego are dotted with white-winged
yachts of the southern fleet. No section
of the United States presents more attrac-
tions for yachting and kindred sports.
Off shore from Los Angeles County lie the
islands of Santa Catalina, San Clemente,
Santa Rosa, San Nicholas and others, some being delightful resorts, summer
or winter, and abounding in wind-sheltered harbors, with scenery often
approaching the sublime.

The mainland port most affected by the fleet is San Pedro, a little bay,
partly artificial, that reaches in from the sea toward the town of Wilmington.
Here the yachts winter, some on the " ways," others at moorings, all ready to
put to sea at the whim of the owners.

Several yacht clubs have been established from time to time in Southern
California waters, but at present the fleet of Los Angeles County sails under
the flag of the Catalina Yacht Club that was organized in 1892. This fleet
includes among its vessels the fastest yachts on the Pacific coast ; crafts that are
ready to meet any Eastern yacht that might venture to compete with them, and
which are good examples of Pacific coast yacht-building. Among the most
notable of the fleet is La Paloma, a beautiful sloop owned by Hancock Banning,
one of the owners of Santa Catalina Island and the leading spirit in this sport.
La Paloma is distinctively a racer, and has made a record equalled by no other
yacht on this coast. La Paloma was built at San Pedro, and in 1889 went to
San Diego to meet the yachts of the San Francisco and Pacific Yacht Clubs, and
was there classed with the Annie and Sappho, beating them both — coming in
fourteen minutes ahead of the Annie and twenty minutes ahead of the Sappho.
This race was straight away for ten miles, wind abaft, and a ten-mile beat dead
to windward, and was most exciting, as it was sailed in half a gale of wind, so
that the yachts of the Paloma class could not use topsails.

The superior qualities of La Paloma were shown in beating to the wind-



* The Californian is indebted to F. G. Schumacher, the well-known photographer of Los Angele?
photographs which illustrate this paper.

Vol. IV— I 3



for the



YACHTING IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA.





ward. La Palotna is a sloop of
graceful lines resting on the water, a
veritable picture, and under sail a
thing of beauty in all the term implies.
Previous to the advent of the Palotna
the Annie was the champion, having
borne the pennant for ten years prior
to her defeat. The San Francisco
Yacht Club presented the Palotna witli
its championship whip, which the
latter still flies as a challenge to all
comers. New yachts are continually
being added to the fleet, among them
the T. Eli 'is, a staunch little vessel ;
the schooner San Diego, the sloops
Restless and Puritan, and the beautiful
schooner Penelope,

The Aggie, formerly owned by Mr.
D. MeFarland, long held the cham-
pionship for schooners in Los Angeles
County waters, but in a race off San
Pedro in 1890, the Penelope defeated
her, though she lost her topmast early
in the race, and now holds the cham-
pionship for schooners in the Pacific.

The little harbor of San Pedro is
often dotted with the white wings of
the fleet, and from here the start is
made for many a delightful cruise.
As we slip cable and glide out by the
end of Dead Man's Island, no fairer



vista for yachting could be imagined.
( Mice clear of the point and the kelp
beds, the blue waters of the ocean are
seen, defying description. Away in-
land the sweep of the lofty Sierra
Madres are visible, their snowcaps
-learning high above the orange
groves of Pasadena and the San
Gabriel Valley. Along shore the
white beach reaches away, telling of
Redondo and Santa Monica, where
the surf pounds musically on the sand.
Full and strong comes the wind,
and as the yacht bears away, a big
mountain appears rising from the sea.
This is Santa Catalina, the home of
the Catalina Yacht Club, a veritable
isle of summer the year around, and a
region of unfailing delight to the
yachtman or tourist. From the chan-
nel, which is about twenty-five miles
wide, Catalina looks like two islands,
the division being caused by a narrow
break or isthmus which connects
them. The island rises, as we near
it. and is seen to be a mountain range
twenty-two miles long, rising from
the sea like some strange monster.
The sea is a rich cerulean blue, and
when beaten into the air by the prow, it



Online LibraryCharles Frederick HolderThe Californian (Volume 4) → online text (page 2 of 120)