Charles Frederick Holder.

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cultivation.

PROFIT OP FRUIT-GROWING IN CALIFORNIA

The large profits realized by California fruit growers make a ten or twenty acre lot equal 1
value to a farm of a quarter section in the grain-growing States. The average yield is from $:)
to $300 per acre yearly, while exceptional cultivation and some varieties of fruits bring the ast<-
ishing yields of $500 to $1,000 per acre. The fruit industry, too, has been found to be one of 1e
safest and surest in the United States. It is a common thing in the older colonies to find colonis
living in luxury upon a twenty-acre tract, while those owning larger acreages are rapicp
accumulating wealth.

THE FIRST TRACT DISPOSED OF

As the above facts came to be generally understood, there was no delay on the part of 1e
people in taking these lands, so that in a very short time the entire tract of 3,060 acres was tain
m lots of five acres and upwards. One thousand acres was planted to raisin grapes in the winr
of 1890 and this winter ('90 and '91) the remaining 2,060 acres will be planted to grapes, figs ad
other fruits.

LAND VALUES

The fact of such large profits from California lands, makes their cultivation mean far me
in this country than in those of the grain-growing States. Land that will yield a yearly incoe
of $100 per acre is worth at least $500 per acre. Estimating upon the basis of a ten per c<t
profit upon the capital invested, it is worth $1,000, but to say $500 is making it strong enou;-
Now grain growing land throughout the West is not worth more than $40 to $60 per acre and ce
cannot take up new land worth $15 to $25 and make it worth in three or four years even %\
unless it be in exceptional instances ; whereas in California, land that is worth $100 per acren',
is certainly worth {|500 within three years' time if properly set to fruits and well tended, al
double that time will make it worth $1,000. This is one of the secrets of rapid money making l
California. The practical question, however, which presents itself to one unable to move to t s
country, either from lack of means or from business, such that it is impossible to leave it foa
time is

HOW CAN I PROCURE SUCH A PLACE AND HAVE IT MADE TO PRODUCE WITHOUT MY

PERSONAL ATTENTION

We have solved this question in the plan of our colonies. We take a large tract, divid* t
into small lots, taking five acres as our unit, and dispose of the whole tract in five acre lots, oi'f
any number of them in one body, asking only that the means necessary to plant out the lad
and cultivate it for three years be paid as needed to perform the work. We do all the work ad
care for the crops until they have yielded enough to pay for the land when it is then deedeco
th© purchaser, costing him in actual cash outlay the price named for cultivation. He has *



FR U IT LANDS

to undergo the expense of removal, erection of buildings, cash payment upon land nor
lany expenses incidental to individual operation. On the other hand., if he be a poor man,
left at his regular employment, thus assuring him his support and enough means to keep up the
ise of cultivation, and when he is ready to remove to his land, it is yielding him a nice income
id of demanding large outlays. Or, if one simply takes land in this colony as an investment
itending to make it his home, he will procure a property which will yield him each year as
i as it has cost him in cash outlay. Thus it will oe seen that while it brings within reach of
)lonist all the advantages of the ordinary colony, it lessons the expense of acquiring such a
rty to half or one-third the actual cash outlay usually required. The idea is that of
oration in all the expense until the property is brought up to a producing condition and the
is paid for when it becomes the individual property of the subscriber. It is evident that to
lasealarge tract of land it may be had on better terms than a small one; also that by
the work on a large scale, under one management, not only may the cost be brought down
lower than if it were all done under individual ownership and management, but that more
•m results may be secured, besides everyone knows that the greatest bar to individual
prise of this sort is the comparatively large outlay necessary to I egin. The great number of
•e }ple who live upon a salary and never can save enough to undertake the work of procuring such
, liome is very large, and without such a plan as this they can never hope to become independent
and owners.



A FEW QUESTIONS ANSWERED



1. Our tract is from two to five miles from P. R. station.

2. It is two to five miles from Madera and twenty from Fresno.

3. Water rights are a part and parcel of the land and cannot be separated from it.

4. Water for domestic use is found at from 50 to 75 feet (surface water at 10 feet) of the
irest and best quality.

5. The elevation above sea level is 300 feet.

6. It is forty miles to the mountains and only 100 miles to the famous Yosemite Valley,
renowned all over the world for its remarkable scenery.

7. Plenty of deer are found in the mountains and foothills, and small game such as quail,
licks, geese, rabbits, etc., abound in the valley. If you are of the dangerous, yellow-backed
B(»rt, you can receive satisfaction by clambering up high into the mountains and encountering
.bruin.

8. The rainy season begins in October and ends in April. It does not rain all the time but
! aamuch as it does in the East during the summer.

9. The climate is fine for consumptives if they come in time for it to help them. Rheumatism ,
(Catarrh and kindred troubles are usually helped.

10. Fog is almost unknown here in the summer and it only occurs in winter during damp
I weather during which times it will be foggy in any land.

11. The sea breeze reaches us in the afternoon, blowing from the northwest.

12. The soil of the land we offer is alluvial, deep and strong.

13. Good oak wood is sold at six dollars a cord.

14. Groceries and provisions are a little higher than in the East in some items. Flour and
meat are about the same price.

15. Lumber is worth from $15 for refuse to $35 per M. for best.

16. Wages for farm "laborers are $30 per month and board, the man furnishing his own
blankets.

17. There is less danger from earthquakes than there is in the East, and none at all from
'lightning, which is seldom seen.

18. Strawberries can be had ten months out of twelve.

19. Good teachers can always find a position. Teachers' wages range from $60 to $125 pei
month.

20. All attainable Government land is of rugged nature, not capable of irrigation, far dis-
tant from business centers, and it would require more capital to settle on it than is required for
settlement in close neighborhoods.

21. Our land is entirely level, has no brush, trees nor stones upon it and is free from
alkali.

22. While at Washington and Philadelphia people fall dead in the streets with the ther-
mometer at 90 degrees in the San Joaquin valley the hay harvest is gathered in absolute safety
with the thermometer at 110 degrees. The exceedingly dry atmosphere promotes rapid evapora-
tion which works this apparent wonder.

If you desire land in this colony, send the money to Bank of Madera, Treasurer, $300 per
five acre lot if you wish it planted this winter, otherwise $150 which will secure you the lot and
out it in preparation for planting to the best of advantage next year. Send money by bank
draft. Do not send personal checks as it costs exchange to collect them.

List of colonists and references to our reliability furnished upon request. Address

The John Brown Colony, Madera, California






INCORPORHTED 1863,



R. H.Mc DONALD, President
FRANK V. MCDONALD, Cashier R. H. McDON ALD, Jr., Vice-President



Pacific Bank,

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL



OLDEST CHARTERED COMMERCIAL BANK ON THE PACIFIC COAST



PAID-UP CAPITAL, IN GOLD . . $1,000,000

SURPLUS 800,000

AVERAGE RESOURCES . 4,?o0,000

YEARLY VOLUME OF BUSINESS . . 225,000,000



Depositors secured by the unlimited PRO rata guarantee of all the
shareholders.

Banking Connections in all the important centers of the world.

letters of credit for use of travelers, available in all parts of the world.

Telegraphic Transfers in Cipher made in London, Paris, 3erlin and
various places in the United States.

Drafts issued on Australia and the Orient.

Dividends and Coupons collected.

Bullion bought and sold.

Orders executed for all Investment Securities.

State, County, City and Water Bonds negotiated.

Approved Business^Papers discounted or received as Security for I/oans.

I,oans on Goods in Transit.

I/oans on Warehouse Receipts.

Collections on the Pacific Coast, Mexico, Central and South America,
New Zealand, India, China and Japan, handled at lowest rates, with prompt-
ness and dispatch.

Bills drawn on Union Bank of I/ondon, Credit I,yonnais, Paris, and
Direction der Disconto Gesellschaft, Berlin, and other important cities of
Europe.



lo & GKO *06X o sMcv'6" Vt eC"<3 'tt ex o






DEPOSITS AS SMALL AS $1.00 RECEIVED.



/



ST



^> oicc nrnnoiT ^4






>? SAFE DEPOSIT



Cor. Market and Fourth Streets

SAM FRANCISCO

Paolflo Bank, Tv&eL&txv&x:




^





Capital Stock
Paid up in Cash
Subject to Call



$1,000,000.00
( 333,333.33
} 666,666.67



EREST PER ANNUM FOR LAST TWO YEARS



5.40 on TERM Deposits
4.50 ON ORDINARY DEPOSITS



Carried Women and Children may deposit money subject to their control,
accounts confidential. Interest credited twice a year and commences
date of deposit.

pen from 9.00 a. m. to 3.00 p. m. on week days and on Monday and
Saturday evenings from 6.30 to 8.30.



Any one interested in finance does not fall to find
the study of the stamp system of savings one in which
there is much food for thought. Undoubtedly it is the
best system in the world to encourage
small savings.

In Germany it has resulted in the
hoarding up of millions of marks
by the poor people, who call down
blessings upon its originator.
, The 5-cent stamp system is in full
operation at the People's Home
Savings Bank, and those who have
investigated it are convinced of its
efficacy.

About llpoo stamp-saving books
have been issued by the bank to
nipe • some Stamp. the peo ple of San Francisco. In
each book are ten or fifteen deposit cards, and when
enough stamps have been purchased from time to time
to fill one of the cards, that card is worth a dollar at
Ihe People's Home Savings Bank, 805 Market Street,
corner 4th. As an object lesson in saving to the youth
of the land the stamp system is invaluable.




The People's Home Savings Bank has adopted a
very effective plan for accumulating a good sum of money
by small savings. The bank has a large number of
small nickel-plated safes, oblong in shape and about
half the size of an ordinary
cigar-box. These will each
hold about $35 in silver coin,
and their use is becoming
general in San Francisco. To
get a safe, you simply deposit
a dollar with the People's
Home cashier and take it
home, where you drop in an
occasional dime or more, and
wake up some morning to




find that you have $35 of
surplus coin on hand. The



only way you can get at this is to take the little safe
to the People's Home Savings Bank, where the key is
kept, and there unlock it. The dime-savers then deposit
the money in the People's Home Savings Bank, and
thus lay the foundation for a fortune.— San Francist*
Chronicle.



A special feature of the People's Home Savings Bank is the Safe Deposit Vaults; the strongest without
exception on the Coast: easy of access, being on the ground floor of the Bank; brilliantly lighted with arc and
incandescent lights, and secure and convenient for the inspection of valuables.

Individual Steel Safes, inside the Vaults, may be secured at rentals of from $4.00 to $20.00 per annum. The
■mallest safe is large enough *»r your Insurance Policies, your Will, Stocks, Bonds, a good deal of coin, and quite
• supply of Jewelry.

Rooms are furnished the depositors for the private inspection of valuables, where they can lock themselves in
from all intrusion.

Down stairs are absolutely fire-proof and burglar-proof vaults with capacity for storing amounts of silverware,
trunks and boxes containing furs, laces, clothing and other valuables.

JOHN E. FARNUM.

Manager and Secretary.



COLU^SUC WATERHOUSE.

President.



INTEREST WORKS WHILE YOU SLEEP.



"^Bl^^P^ MI SCELLANE OUS ^^ ^K""'^"!^




The Wonderlands of the Great Pacific

HAWAII, SAMOA, NEW ZEALAND and AUSTRALIA,

Are reached only by the Splendid
American Steamers of the

OCEANIC STEAMSHIP CO.

Perpetual Spring. Rarest Tropical Luxuriance.
A Traveler's Paradise.






^^ t



Kilauea, on Hawaii, the largest active Volcano
i n the World .

ROUND TRIP TICKETS to Honolulu at
$125.00. Through tickets to Auckland or
Sydney allow stop-overs at Sandwich Islands
and Samoa. Send 10 cents in postage stamps for
** Trip to Hawaii," a pamphlet of exquisite
photogravures.



g&* Prompt attention paid to Telegraphic Reservations of Staterooms.and Berths. For Tickets, or further
information, call on or address,

J. D. SPRECKELS & BROS. COMPANY,

General Agents, 327 Market Street, "V .' .' .' San Francisco, Cal.



RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA



-a



*



THE ROWELL



*



Kr



First-Class Hotel, Moderate Prices, Central Location



E. J. DAVIS, Proprietor



W. W WILSON, Manager



Every
yHeal=Time

At Breakfast — a Strengthener.
At Luncheon — a Comfort.
At Dinner — a Necessity.




Rex Brand



Cudahys
Extract

Beef



OF



is always relished. It is the preserved nutri-
ment of pure, lean beef — health-giving and
delicious. Makes the most appetizing Soups,
Gravies, Beef Tea, Etc.

Your grocer sells It — They all do.

Send 6c in stamps for postage on sample package,
\nailed free.

Manufactured by

THE CUDAHY PACKING CO,
SOUTH OMAHA, NEB.



"tKDlLG 1D15 T^QjRiD"

Is the Best Wash Fabric in the Country
for Ladies* and Children's Wear



The Styles are of the Highest Order,

The colors strictly fast, the fabrics perfect



► END FOR SAMPLES.



For sale by all the Leading Retail
Dry Goods Houses



PRODUCED BY



PARKHILL MF6. CO.



FITCHBURG, MASS.



C&ORNIAN

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@



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It is local in its character, yet cosmopolitan, wide in its researches, seeking to
build up this glorious State, by vividly, yet truthfully describing its many beauties,
both of scenery and climate, and its great advantages to the prospective home-seeker
whether robust or in delicate health.

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To Postmasters we offer an opportunity to make money. Send for circular.

T6 Advertisers we offer wonderful advantages.

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YOUNG LADIES



Who Ride




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m TENNIS,

or Atten d

GYMNASIUM,

SHOULD WEAR

FERRI5'

Good Sense

Corset Waists.

Full or Slim BUST. Long or Short WAIST.
ALL SHAPES. White, Drab or Black.

FOR SALE BY ALLLEADING RETAILERS.

MARSHALL FIELD & CO., CHICAGO,

Western Wholesale Depot.
Send for Illus. 'C'C'D'pTC DpflQ Manufacturers
circular to rJCXvIxlO JJlvU«3«» and Patentees,

Principal Office . 341 Broadway, Hew York.
Bbanch Office: 18 Sutter St., San Francisco, Cal.



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Great Durability. Easy Terms, old Instruments

taken in Exchange. Write for Catalogue and full

information. 170 TREMONT ST., BOSTON, MASS.




Jfbsofutely
Pure



A cream of tartar baking powder.
Highest of all in leavening strength.
— Latest United States Government
Food Report.

Royal Baking Powder Co.

106 Wall St , N. Y.



Unlike the Dutch Process

No Alkalies

OB —

Other Chemicals




are used in the
preparation of



W. Bate & Co.'s

Breakfast
Cocoa,

which is abso-
lutely pure
and soluble.

It has more than three times the strength
of Cocoa mixed with Starch, Arrowroot or
Sugar, and is far more economical, costing
less than one cent a cup. It is delicious,
nourishing, and easily digested.

Sold by Grocers everywhere.

W. BAKER & CO., DORCHESTER, MASS.








PASO DEROBLES



luis oetspo COUNTY",

CALIFORNIA,
i



f **<• The Waters ©F .
UnequaledJ^edecinalvalue



MEW MoTEL AMD COTTAGES




-f



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rhn Prjiifnrninn leads i



terary Merit
Artistic Illustrations



KMONG



f TTNIVEBSITT J

Jumbian Edition

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MURRAY & LANMAN'S

Is the original "Florida Water" and
has nothing in common with the numer-
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sold on the strength of its reputation.

ACCEPT NO SUBSTITUTE FOR




FLORIDA WATER

Insist on having the genuine perfume.
There is nothing like it, whether for the
Handkerchief, the Toilet, or the Bath.
Remember the name

MURRAY & LANMA1TS



To Newsdealers and the Public

THE ENTIRE
EASTERN EDITION

OF THK

May O^i^iproRiviAJV

Was destroyed by Fire in the Postal Car at

Goodyear, Cal., on the Evening of

April 17th.

Those of our Readers who desire to secure
Copies of the MAY Number to complete their
volumes can now be accommodated by applying
to the American News Co., New York.

THE CALIFORNIAN PUBLISHING CO.



# w w «#



. + - * + -



t a ft



»~ a »* a • m «* m »* m %7 m & m



%#




TAPLE'Or* CONTENTS 4



The Shadow oe the Cross
THE CALIFORNIA PCPPY .
THE MISSIONS OF CALIFORNIA .

Illustrated from drawings by Nellie S Goodloe, F.
K. Standish, W. K. Briggs, and from photographs.

FROM NICE TO GENOA

Illustrated by Harry R. Hopps, W. K. Briggs, and
from photographs.

REPORTING WITH MARK TWAIN .
THE CALIFORNIAN MONTADURA

Illustrated from sketches by F. R. Standish, Paul
J. 1 illaux, and from photographs.

TrlE MAN UNDER THE STONE
PEACH=TREE JOE . . .

A CHILD'S KISS

THE AHBITION OF CLEVELAND

LILIFS OF FAITH .

THE FARHER IN CALIFORNIA .

Illustrated from photographs.

DAWN THROUGH THE GOLDEN GATE .

Illustrated by W. K. Briggs.

ALASKAN DAYS

Illustrated from photographs.

A REDWOODS IDYLL ....

Illustrated by Susan Sroufe Eoosley, H. R. Hopps,
E. Vesaria. and from photographs.

THE HEART OF THE SIERRAS .

Illustrated by F. R. Standish, and from photographs.

XENOPHANES

TEKEL

SALT LAKE CITY

Illustrated from drawings by W. K. Briggs. I L R.
Hopps, P. J. Tillaux., and from photographs by
Salisbury & Johnson and A. R. Savage.

IN THE SOUND COUNTRY .

Illustrated from photographs.

STORH IN THE MOUNTAINS .
GOING ASHORE IN GUATEMALA

A SILHOUETTE (Drawings bv A. Farnsworth) ,

THE LAW AND THE CHINAriAN

With portrait of Mr. Geary.

BIG GAflE IN THE WEST



ina d. coolbrith
Laura Bride Powers



Frontispiece

141

. 142



Fannie C. W. Barbour

Dan de QuiEEE . !
M. C. Frederick

ChareES Edwin Markham
Sarah Orne Jewett .
Genevieve L. Browne .
Richard H. McDonald, Jr.
Rose Hartwick Thorpe
John R. Grayson

Joaquin Mieeer

Arthur Inkerseey

John Vance Cheney

Lteeian E. Purdy

Archibaed Lampman
Charees Gordon Rogers .
Harry R. Browne .



Herbert Heywood

H. Van Aulen Ferguson
DeWitt C. Lockwood
Helen Rachee Robb
Hon. Thomas J. Geary



. Don Arturo Bandixi

QUESTIONS OF THE DAY

A Revival of the Chinese Question.

BOOKS AND AUTHORS



158

170

179

186
187
191
192
199
200

214

216

228

244

259

259
260



280

291

292
297
304

314



•COPYRICrVT 1 3 95 • BY-
.Tnfc-CALIFORNIAN-PVBUSHINC CO-



•ISSVED • FROMTME- PRESS- OFTME-
SAW PRAACISCO-PRIATIMC-CO-



EATEREDW-
SAM FRAMCISCO- POST-OFFICE AS-
SECOND* CLASS-MAIL MATTER-



I

|-BS|fflSlHEN Ben Franklin declared his g

i ^^mWJ i ntent i° n °f g°i n g mt0 the news- j

I ^M»P a P er business his mother tried to : f

I ^^^^Sdissuade him. She said there were I

| two newspapers in the country already, and I

I that was enough. This terse conclusion of *

| Franklin, mere, was rigorously exemplified a j

I little more than a year ago, when the propo- |



I sition of launching another bark on the sea of |

I magazine literature was entertained. *

| The success of the "Californian Magazine" g

I was assured, however, from its inception, and I



| its steady increase in popularity justifies the |

I publishers in enlarging their plans and the f

| general scope of the magazine in every direc-

| tion. As a result of this new departure, ar- I

| rangements have been made by which con- c

I tributions will appear during the ensuing months jj

(| from many celebrated writers, among whom

| are :



4

Julian Hawthorne, Harriet Prescott Spofford, §

<| Gertrude Atherton, Capt. Charles King,

| Octave Thanet, Joaquin Miller, i

i I

J Theodore Van Dyke, George Parsons Lathrop, 4

Ella Wheeler Wilcox, Ina Coolbrith, *
Ex-Governor Sheldon, Judge Albion Tourgee,

| etc., etc., etc. |

I *



/ -JHj ■■■If ■ I



HIGHBINDER ALARMED BY
FLASH-LIGHT.



THE "CALIFORNIAN" SERIES OF ARTICLES .1

ON

Ylje G*W ese Question

HICH began with the paper on "Opium,"
(with its startling reproductions of flash-light
lotographs), was followed by Rev. Frederic J. Mas-
pro-Chinese article on "Our Treaties with
i," and Hon. Thomas J. Geary's paper on
lie Law and the Chinaman," in the present num-
will be continued. Future articles will describe
working Chinaman in the shop and on the farm,
itrasting his surroundings, means of sustenance,

with that of the white laborer.
A series of handsomely illustrated articles on
i ad a loupe, Vera Crufc, Village Life in
:xico, and the Mountains, Rivers and Natural
•ks of Colorado are in course of preparation,
id will appear during the present year.
Early numbers of the Caufornian will also cou-
i a reply to Congressman Bland's article in the
.rena," on the Silver Bill, by Hon. W. W.

»wers, Republican Congressman of the Southern District ; papers of

lusual interest by Hon. Abbot Kinney and Hon. Morris M. Estee,

the Question of State Division, pro and con, besides important

says by Richard H. McDonald, Jr., on the momentous political

>jects of the day.

Remenyi, the celebrated violinist, will prepare an article containing

teresting reminiscences of his professional career in two hemispheres ;

larles Hallock will write of the Hudson Bay Co. and Alaska,

KxGov. Uonel A. Sheldon will give his personal recollections of

Mieral Grant.

The August ' ' Calif ornian f '

r ill be a remarkably brilliant number. It will contain illustrated articles
on the Ascent of Mount Shasta, Trout-fishing, Cuba, Artemus Ward (giv-
ing the humorist's definition of "genius," and his futile efforts to engraft
the idea upon the unimpressionable mind of Mark Twain), California at the
World's Fair, A Navajo Blanket, Spirit Photography, (a reply to Dr.
Elliott Coues' article in the Californian on "Can Ghosts be Photo-
graphed?") Types of Kentucky Beauty, William Blake, Siam (superbly
illustrated), The Woman's Press Association of California, etc., etc.

i SPECIAL OFFER— Two JVswines f or ^ Frice °f 0l *-
A combination rate for the Californian Magazine and The Trav-
,ER is offered by the publishers, which enables the subscriber to secure
th magazines for $3.00. The regular price for the two is $4.00. Send
.00 at once, and both magazines will be mailed to any address for one year.



The Subscription price of the Californian Magazine is $3.00 per year.
Single numbers, 25 cents. Postage prepaid except on Foreign Subscriptions, which
require 75 cents in addition to regular terms.



The Californian Publishing Co.



LOS ANGELES, CAL.

Burdick Block.



411 Market Street,



'



<



NEW YORK,

Room 12, Tribune Building. ♦



San Francisco, California.



Online LibraryCharles Frederick HolderThe Californian (Volume 4) → online text (page 20 of 120)