Charles Frederick Holder.

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is 1,000,000 glossed labels, besides great quantities of bank and commercial
work, and all such products as pertain to the engravers' and printers' arts.



PUBLISHER'S SUPPLEMENT.



Ill 1

- Ill



shop. At first he performed all the work himself ; then, after a time, his means
admitted of his hiring a boy, and later, man by man, a staff of employees was
engaged, nearly all of whom are still in the establishment. His perseverance,
business ability and punctuality in meeting the requirements of his customers
gained for him that increase in business which only such qualities can insure.
A company was formed, and after no less than eleven removals from place to

place, necessitated by the extension of the
company's operations, a three-story building
on Main street was taken in 1883, and thither
the firm removed its greatly enlarged plant.
And now disaster assailed the company.
They had just got into good working order
and full business swing, when, during the
absence of Mr. Schmidt in Los Angeles, the
entire plant was destroyed by fire. This
was in June, 1884, and their engagements
with the fruit-canning companies were
extensive and had to be met. These
companies, in order to obtain funds necessary to carry on their business,
depend upon the delivery of labels. Canned goods cannot be shipped without
bearing their respective labels, whereas when labelled and shipped, the ship-
pers can draw drafts on them. To fulfil their engagements with the canning
companies was imperative. Fortunately there happened to be for sale in the
market three presses which were immediately bought and in an incredible
short space of time work was renewed, engagements fulfilled, and confidence
in the firm's stability and punctuality in performance of its contracts main-
tained.

The company rebuilt, procured a spendid plant and commenced running
on a larger scale and in better shape. But the house was doomed to meet with
another catastrophe. In August, 1886, the entire building was again burned to
the ground and the plant destroyed. Mr. Schmidt was at Sacramento at the time
this occurred, on his return from a recuperating trip to the Yosemite. No
sooner did he receive the unpleasant tidings than he hastened to San Francisco,
succeeded in purchasing Bancroft & Co.'s plant, again began operations, and
again rebuilt.

The occurrence of two such dis-
asters in the space of two years
caused the insurance companies to
fight shy of issuing future policies
to so unlucky a firm, and it was
decided to build on a plan that
would reduce the risk of fire to the
minimum. The building was, in
pursuance of this idea, built in three
compartments, the dividing walls of
which were erected in brick and are
so massive as to be practically fire-
proof. The wisdom of this system was evident and the house finds no shyness
now on the part of insurance companies. Plenty of insurance can be obtained
at lower rates than ever.

In the building on Main street the central compartment is devoted to office
use and the Art Rooms. The main building— for in fact each compartment may
be considered as a separate edifice— contains the presses, book-bindery, storeroom,
etc., while to the left of it, a three-story building is used exclusively for glossing




JANUARY 1 " "K* I88S



PUBLISHER'S SUPPLEMENT.



ill



labels. A sixty-five horse power engine occupies the basement specially
constructed for the purpose, below the press-room, which also contains all
shafting and belting.

In this large and well-arranged establishment, which is the result of per-




GENERAL VIEW OF PRESS-ROOM, SCHMIDT LABEL
AND LITHOGRAPH CO.



severance and courage under difficulties, 250 hands are employed. There are
no fewer than thirty-five presses worked by steam power, and twenty-six
hand presses, besides a great quantity of other machinery. The daily capacity
is 1,000,000 glossed labels, besides great quantities of bank and commercial
work, and all such products as pertain to the engravers' and printers' arts.




A GEORGIA SPRINGTIME.



BY PRANK I.



T \nTon.



But yesterday 'twas Winter in the valleys and the hills,

An' the violet was a-droopin' an 1 the lily had the chills ;

An' the frost was hangin' heavy where the cotton blossom shines,

An' the darky was a-weepin' by the watermelon vines.

But now jes' see the weather ! In a cloud of pinks and white,

The mock in' birds are singin' an' the larks are out o' sight ;

An' the cattle — they are ploddin' through the daisies in the dells,

An' a feller falls to noddiir at the tinkle o' their bells.

0, its line — this kind o' livhf in this blessed land o' ours ;

One day you're pitchin' snowballs an' the next you're pullin' flowers !

But we take it as we find it from the Springtime to the Fall ;

If we melt, we never mind it ; if we freeze — we freeze. That's all.




"^RWUli BAKING POWDER

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Everything used in making
Cleveland's Baking Powder
is named on the label, infor-
mation not given by other
makers.

Cleveland's is a pure cream
of tartar powder, is in the first
class and first in the class.



The best known writers on
domestic science, as

Marion Harland, Mrs. McBridc,
Mrs. Parker and Emily Hayes,

and teachers of cookery,

as Mrs. Ewing, Mrs. Rorer, Mrs. Lincoln
and Mrs. Dearborn,

useCleveland's BakingPowder



One

rounded teaspoonful
of Cleveland's
Baking Powder
does more and better work
than a h eaping
teaspoonful
of any other.
A large saving on a
year's bakings.



A quarter pound can will
be mailed free on receipt of 1 5
cents in stamps, with your
name and address.
Cleveland Baking Powder Co.
ulton St.,
New York City.




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WOULD SEND BURNING WORDS.

It is believed in scientific and political
circles that if you had a wire to the
Hawaiian Islands, the cabled observa-
tions of the American citizens there
would keep it hot. We are inclined to
this view. — Commercial Advertiser.

THE REAL TROUBLE.

"What? Got your patent leather
boots blacked and bought them only ten
days ago! Wasn't the leather any
good ? ' '

1 ' The leather is all right, but the
patent seems to have expired." — London
Tit-Bits.

A LEADING PART.

" Blinkins tells me he has a leading
part in the company he is with."

"Yes, he's with the ' Uncle Tom's
Cabin ' troupe, and he takes the blood-
hounds to and from the theater." — Chi-
cago Inter-Ocean.

BILL NYE TO THE FRONT.

Iii Vancouver recently a man persisted
in interrupting Bill Nye and Burbank.
At last Nye stepped forward to the foot-
lights and inquired : "Is Dr. Keeley in
the house?" The audience yelled, and
the loafer subsided.

THE H-ENGLISH OF IT.

Old bachelor (in want of a house-
keeper) — ' ' And where did you say your
last place was ? ' '

Applicant — " My last place was at
Knemal, sir."

Old bachelor — " What's the name of it
—Animal ? "

Applicant — " No, sir, Enemal."

Old bachelor — "Where the dooce is
that?"

Applicant — "It's bin Suffick, sir, Lord
Stradbrooke's."

Old bachelor — " How do you spell it ? "

Applicant — "Haitch, hee. hen, haitch,
hay, hem, haitch, hay, hell, hell, sir."

Old bachelor (relieved) — "O-o-o-o-o-h!
Hen ham hall ! ' ' — -Judy.



IN A PICTURE GALLERY.

A — "That's a newly married couple."
B — ' ' How do you know ? ' ' A — ' ' He is
always stepping on her dress." B —
' ' What does that prove ? ' ' A— ' ' After
he has been married .some time and
found out what a dress costs, he will be
more careful." — Fliegende Blattner.

Mrs. Fangle. — I've advertised for a
servant for a whole week with no result.

Mrs. Cumso. — Well, I advertised for a
good-looking help lady, and had thirty-
four to select from the first day. — Har-
per' s Bazaar.

WISE AND OTHERWISE.

It is the troubles of to-morrow that
make people heavy laden to-day.

While the disciples were clamoring for
the highest place, not one of them
deserved the lowest one.

The man who claims that the world
owes him a living generally has trouble
in collecting the debt.

It never adds anything to the force
of a Christian's testimony to carry a
iwolver in his hip-pocket.

It is as cowardly to talk about a man
behind his back as it is to throw stones
at his house in the dark.

You can tell more about a man's char-
acter by trading horses with him than
you can by hearing him talk in prayer
meeting.

There is something wrong if you feel
spiteful whenever you see another woman
wearing a better bonnet than you can
afford.

There are plenty of places where a
preacher's testimony will do the Lord
more good than in a patent medicine
advertisement.

There are thousands of people who
would die before they would steal chick-
ens, who are downright robbers in other
ways that are not so risky.

There's nothing like discipline, but it
don't do a boy any good to make him
hoe potatoes in the back garden while a
brass band is passing the house. — Ram' s
Horn.







The REMINGTON STAND-
ARD TYPEWRITER is the
of f i c ial Writing Ma-
chine
Columbian Exposition



I




G. G. WICKSON & CO.,
3 and Front St., S. F.
221 S. Broa way, Los Angeles
14-1 Fron^ St., Portland. Or.



YACHTSMEN, HO !

Sportsmen, Travellers, do you know
What relief for rashes, stings,
Packer's Tar Soap always brings?
Odors to its cleansing yield,
Irritcticns too are healed—
Caused by sunburn, chafing, heat,
Or by shoes that rub the feet.
Rest, too, follows in the path
Of a Packer's Tar Soap bath.



We are advertised by our loving: friends.'



GIVE THE BABY




Mellin's Food

If you wish your infant to be well nourished,

healthy, bright, and a.ctive, and to grow

up happy, robust, and vigorous.



The BEST FOOD for Hand-fed Infants, In-
valids, Convalescents, Dyspeptics,
and the Aged is

f MELLIN'S FOOD

For Infants and Invalids.



"Another MelHn's Food Boy."
HENRY HAWTHORNE SMITH
Oakland, . - - Cal.
At 5 months.



Our Book for the instruction of mothers,

"The Care and Feeding of Infants/'

will be mailed free to any address upon
request.



DOLIBER-GOODALE CO.,

BOSTON, MASS.




WOMAN IN



A woman in a hotel is like a live wire
on a frolic, or a runaway horse at a fun-
eral. She can give and countermand
more orders in fifteen minutes after her
trunks come up, than a man could think
of in a week. She writes half a dozen
Letters a day, using three or four sheets
of tiie hotel paper in each one, and calls
up a bell boy to mail each one separately.
She puts all sorts of things in the safe,
and no one minds that so much as the
things she does n't put there, but is per-
fectly sure ske did. Of course, she finds
them up stairs under the pillow, and
apologizes so prettily one can't help but
be glad she made the mistake.

She never makes out a wash list but
she " knows" exactly what she had, and
one pair has n't been returned. She keeps
the ponderous bell boy promenading up
and down stairs all day with roses and
cards, parcels and messages, and never
remembers to tip him ; but it is good for
his digestion, makes him earn his wages,
and teaches him the philosophy of life.
She sends word down to know just when
the 5 o'clock train goes out, and what
time the 7 o'clock limited gets in. Of
course, she does n't eat as much or drink
as much or spend as much monej^ as a
man, but she can make things more lively
with her cards and callers, the people she
is " in " to, and the people she is " out "
to, than a houseful of men.

She wants to live all over the house,
and why not? A pretty woman reading
in a parlor, or waiting on a hall seat, or



scribbling letters in her queer angular
hand at the writing table is ever so much
more interesting an attraction than a
potted palm, or a jardiniere full of flowers.
Ever since the days of the garden evic-
tion, men have followed where women
have led, and the hotel where women
most do congregate is sure to have a gen-
erous following of men. Indeed, it is a
question if a pretty woman that will sit
around in stained glass attitudes and a
handsome gown ought not to have special
rates, if she is n't paid a salary.

There is one thing a woman will do
every time, and that is insist that there
is something wrong about her bill. She
11 knows " just what she has had, and is
sure there is a mistake and you have
charged her too much, but, bless her
heart ! she always pays. Sunshine is n't
surer in June than a woman's honesty.
She never is so "dead broke " at the end
of the trip that she has to pawn her
things or give security on her trunks.
And if you do succeed in pleasing her,
she will tell every one from here to the
Golden Gate that your hotel is the only
decent place in town. A drummer work-
ing on commission and giving his whole
time to it, can't work up half the custom
that one well-suited woman will send you
if you humor her little caprices, serve
her dainty little dishes of nothing sweet-
ened and tied up with bows, and fix up
her bill so that you can afford to dis-
count it a bit when she leaves. — N. Y.
Sun,



■20



-^ BlI M ISCELLA N EOUS"'




Geo. H. Fuller Desk Co.

MANUFACTURERS

BANK> rSol HURC " FURNITURE

638-640 Mission St., San Franeiseo



ZlNFANDEU
^LARETS
DURqUNDV

HocK £ <




e&VUTERNEja

Pfci glESLING
<jUTEDEL




SOLD ONLY IN GLASS

mOim C£AfVWE, t/HLSSS BCAm/VO LgCAX. /*/»£ yv/M»
SMSfPMItO T*AD£M/itr OH CAR S£AJ. Q* CQfiH
__ . __ . OFflOKAKO DEPOT

F.A HABKIL* 101 FRONT ST., S. F.



J. R. SMITH & CO.

MERCHANT TAILORS



—REMOVED



230 BUSH ST. (MILLS BUILDING)
(Formerly under Occidental Hotel) SAN FRANCISCO



PAPER WAREHOUSE



BONESTELL & CO.

Dealers in All Kinds of

Printing <t» Wrapping

— PAPERS



401-403 SANSOME STREET



SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.



CHAT THE



ORANGE AND LEMON INDUSTRY

IN RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA

Is a crowning success, has become a truism, and that

ARMNGT0N4TEIGHTS

A TRACT OP SO?AE 4,000 ACRES

Is THB GBM of Riverside's crown, is equally true.

Young Groves, (ORANGE and LEMON) and locations of beauty for the INVESTOR and
HOMESEEKER, are now being offered on ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, at reasonable prices, and
on easy terms.

A perpetual and abundant water right in the " GAGE CANAL SYSTEM " (one inch to
each five acres) is sold with these lands. This water right is practically free, and is equal to a
rainfall of thirty-five inches per annum.

Some thirteen of the twenty-two miles of the canal of this system are already lined with
concrete, and the water is distributed throughout ARLINGTON HEIGHTS in steel pipes, and
delivered on the highest corner of each lot.

Flowers, fruits and vegetables flourish and mature on ARLINGTON HEIGHTS every
month of the year.

Riverside is famed for her churches and schools, and ARLINGTON HEIGHTS boasts of
one of the finest of the latter.

The main line of the Santa Fe R. R. between Chicago and San Diego runs parallel and
adjacent to ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, affording three stations.

These lands are now being offered at reasonable prices, and on easy terms.

For map and pamphlet accurately describing these lands, address,

THE RIVERSIDE TRUST CO., Limited

RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA.




MIDSUMMER.



^ r ^PPP! MISCELLANEOUS PiPPf-HIc-

I D EXTER BROTHER S^ ENGLISH SHINGLE STAINS
is Shingle Stain used on the buildings at the World's Columbian Exposition. J"$

We challenge anyone to show us a house where our Stain has washed off. A •"

A shingled house, if ]>ninte<l, is not artistic. A moss green /f v V-£i -' \T

roof cannot be obtained by the use of paint. We will send / ;

vou samples of any color of Stain if you will write to us. *£f^Z.*$ «

We study the harmony of colors and can suggest effect ^i

you have not thought of in staining. "■"'Si L

The following firms act as our Agents: ;j ::'»> W*^ \f

SMITH & YOUNG - - San Francisco, Cal. 3 «l§ | *r

BAKKU & RICHARDS - - Seattle, Wash. ,, i'lSllS ' I J^SKF

AX jf-ar" W?r " - '• " •"•■ ?fe-"

Send for sample boards to .^i/^SsSSwraT

DEXTER BROTHERS - -•—

55 BROAD STREET, BOSTON, MASS.




RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA



THE ROWELL



x



K-



First-Class Hotel, Moderate Prices, Central Location



C. J. DAVIS, Proprietor



W. W WILSON, Manager




^^^d^W^) (o.



53\



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Odds and Ends;.



The highest fall in Switzerland is the
Staubbach at Lauterbrunnen.

The highest falls in the world are the
Ribbon Falls of the Yosemite — 3,300
feet.

The highest habitation in this country
is the signal service station on the top of
Pike's Peak.

The editors of the Memphis Commer-
cial and Appeal-Avalanche are bound to
fight a duel, law or no law.

The highest inhabited place in the
world is the custom-house of Ancomarca,
in Peru, 16,000 feet above the sea.

The caflon of the Colorado is 300 miles
long, and the cliffs on either said are from
5,000 to 6,000 feet above the water.

The Greenland newsboys who cry
" Ere's yer Arrangagliotio Natingiunav-

nik Sysarammas Sivik " have well-
developed lungs.

Victor Hugo committed some charm-
ing international blunders. The favorite

unmusical instrument of Scotland he
called " le bugpipe," and the Firth of
Forth he translated as '* Premiere des
Quatre," or " first of the fourth."

The ex- Empress Frederick of Prussia,

the Queen-Regent of the Netherlands,
and the Empress Augusta, all hold the
positions of regimental chiefs in Prussia.

The senior women Colonel is the Em-
press Frederick, who was placed in com-
mand of a regiment of hussars at the
coronation of Emperor William I., Oct.
18, 1 86 1. Princess Frederick Charles,
widow of the famous "Red Prince,"
ranks second in point of time. She re-
ceived her Colonelcy in 1871. Queen
Victoria was made Colonel of a Prussian
regiment of dragoons in 1S89.

The two first named have often ridden
at the head of their regiments, dressed in
their full regimentals, and one of the
Empress Frederick's most dashing pic-
tures shows her thus attired and afield.



The editor of the Hiawatha (Kan.)
World has got tired of having folks say,
"Stop my paper." He offers to send it
for life to any one who will pay fifty
dollars.

Life in Maine is not all that it might
be to aspiring woman. She is not recog-
nized as a person until the Sheriffor tax-
collector is after her. She has no legal
control over her children after the age of
infancy unless they are illegitimate. A
father can will away his children to the
care of a guardian, with the approval of
the Judge of Probate. During good con-
duct a father may be the guardian of his
children though he marries as often as
he pleases. A mother can only be the
guardian of her children while she re-
mains a widow. The Maine man can
convert his property into cash, with
which he can purchase timber land, and
so leave his wife a pauper, for the Maine
woman has no right in uncultivated land.

A R i:\IAKKAI5I.K CHANGE.

A Hungarian peasant went to a Mu-
nich painter and asked him to paint the

portrait of his mother.

" Certainly," said the painter, "send
her to me."

" Hut she is dead ; if she was alive I
wouldn't want her portrait."

'• Well, have you any picture of her ?"

" No ; if I had I wouldn't want one."

" Well, my friend, describe her to me ;
what sort of eyes, hair, etc."

He secured that, and appealing to his
artist friends who had some Hungarian
studies, he painted a head. Thinking
that his joke was too good a one to be
without witnesses, he summoned his
friends and secreted them about the
room ; he sent for the peasant. The
man came, looked at the picture, his
eyes filled with tears ; he put up his hand
to wipe them away.

" Poor fellow." said the artist, patting
him on the back. "It is a good like-
ness, then, it affects you so much ? "

( ' No, ' ' said the man . ' ' Poor mother !
To think she has only been dead six
months, and looks like that ! " — Golden
Rule.



■i\



^WmMWM. resorts MMMM-ip^



V Tbe Tat/ero of Castl? Crags

Is one of the inviting mountain retreats on the Pacific Coast. It is under the
Hotel Del Monte management, has been greatly enlarged to meet increasing
demands, and its mountain environments are pictures iue and delightful beyond
description. Nine hours' ride from Sacramento on the famous Shasta Route.



IT_

BE

NEWS

TO

YOU

THAT



Id tbe Higb Sierra



The attractions are increasing in number everv year. The opening of new roads
through these rugged fastnesses has brought to public notice many delightful scenes.



Lake Taljoc



Is the central attraction, but in its immediate neighborhood are a half dozen or
more charming little mountain gems quite the equal of Tahoe in picturesque
beauty if not as large and famous. A week, or even two weeks, can be very profit-
ably spent in this interesting region.



KiQgS RiVer Caoyoi)



Is coming gradually to public notice as a rival of YOSEniTE. In many respects the
two are remarkably similar. It is further South in the high Sierras and as yet not
as easy of access. But slight difficulties' of travel will be no obstacle to sightseers
who wish to witness the Noblest and Sublimest Natural Architecture on Earth.



California Watering Places



Rank favorably with the best. Hotel Del /lonte has no superior. Its elegance
with a comfortable, home-like atmosphere and reasonable rates are the won-
derment of all comers. Santa Cruz, Santa Barbara, Santa Honica and san
Diego, representing every phase and condition of semi-tropical sea-side life, poss-
ess not only the ordinary attractions of watering places, but the additional and in-
estimable advantage of a perfect climate. These places are all easily reached by rail.



Health is a Priceless Boot)



And yet the road to this happy condition runs in a thousand ways all over the State.
Besides the pure, life-giving atmosphere and genial climate of both mountain and
sea, are its myriads of mineral springs, many of which have healing properties
little less than miraculous. Klamath Hot Springs, in the Siskiyou mountains
possess much merit, and afford endless diversion in the way of scenery, hunting,
fishing, etc.



MaOY Prizes



Can be captured at a single drawing bv taking a trip over the Shasta Route to these
Springs. It includes Castle Crags, MT. SHASTA, Upper Soda Springs, and the

wild scenes in the McCioud and Pitt River country.



Lake CoGoty



f



Is a natural sanitarium and boasts of the famous Bartlett, Harbin, Seigler, Ander-
son, Howard, Adams, Highland, and other excellent mineral springs. Near by are
the wonderful Geysers. In Contra Costa County are Byron Hot Springs. Another
territory remarkable for its fine mineral springs is the Coast Range of mountains
South of San Jose, where are situated the well-known Gilroy, Congress, Paraiso,
Paso Robles and Tassajara Hot Springs. Further South in San Bernardino County,
are the ;avored Arrow Head Hot .springs, and still further the noted Palm ValFey
Springs, a wonderful place for pulmonary ailments.



All desired information about these points will be cheerfully given by any Agent of the



SoCitbero Pacific Con>pai?y



Make inquiries also about routes and rates to the World's Fair, to which visitors may go over any of the

Tbree great Trai)S-Coi)tiQ€Qtal RoCites

of this Company, via El Paso and New Orleans over the SUNSET ROUTE, vio Reno and Ogden over the OGDEN
ROUTE, and via Portland over the SHASTA ROUTE.



RICHARD GRAY

GENERAL TRAFFIC MANAGER



T. H



GOODMAN

GENERAL PASS. AGENT



<*dWPIPiPI RAILROADS WMM »||>>



P'P



For Speed and Comfort in
Traveling see that your
Ticket reads via

THE



TEXAS hnd PACIFIC RY



Short Line between California, Arizona,
New Mexico and New Orleans, the South
East, Memphis, St. Louis, Chicago and
all Eastern Cities.

For Rates and Further Information, apply to



H. W. COLE

Traveling Passenger Agent

No. 121 California Street, San Francisco

A. J. DERUSSY

Gen'e Pacific Coast Passenger Agent
No. 121 California Street, San Francisco

GASTON MESLIER

Gen. Passenger and Ticket Agent
Dallas, Texas



-m



°)%£? W **)?& y2i&



MISCELLANEOUS ?$%££» IIS"

tf.p.^.a. ?.>?.£ <3^3 4 V^




IDVIUft IUQTITHTE Boarding and Dav School for
lnilnu InOIlIUIL (iris; Seventeen Teachers. For
Illustrated Catalogue, address



Online LibraryCharles Frederick HolderThe Californian (Volume 4) → online text (page 41 of 120)