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and BROKER

Deal* in Choice Mortgage Securities,

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Maker and Negotiates Loans on Real Estate and Ap-
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MANUFACTURERS

405-407 SANSOME STREET

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.




5EE THEfl SPARKLE!

. \ / / / / . CDC CI To introduce our great 8

\\jaLiJ/, inCCS page. 48 column Illus-

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Established 1887. we have de-
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$ 1 0,000 worth of the costly and
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Heavy Rolled Gold and REAL
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either of these rings free of cost. Club of two, $2; club of six and
six rings, $5. Exactly as represented, . 1 1
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The largest Curio Store on the

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Complete line of California,
INCORPORATED Tn dian and Mexican Curios>

Shells, Mosses, Wood Goods, Indian Baskets,
Brackets, Silver Filigree and Mexican Opals ;
also a complete line of Japanese and Chinese
curios. Send for a Kiro or Japanese Hand
Warmer and Headache Cure. Sent by mail
for 20c. together with one package of fuel.
Correspondence solicited.




KAN-KOO



110 8 SPRING ST.



LOS ANGELES, CAL.



»^f^^^i^^i"^ IRRIGATION ^i^^li^l^ ^ i^r"

A sM»i «nd mute,,,,

V YUMH, KRIZONH *V

ORGANIZED 1885 REORGANIZED, 1890



This Canal and Improvement Company is located in one of the
most fertile regions of the world, capable of producing all the
tropical fruits. Takes water from the Gila River, about 50 miles
above its junction with the Colorado River, at Yuma. Thirty Thousand
acres of supposed dry land rendered as fertile as the Valley of the Nile.

The Climate of the Mohawk Valley is almost tropical, and
will produce early fruits weeks in advance of any other Pacific
Coast Valley.

The management is amply able to deal fairly and liberally with
all actual locators.



For Circulars and Further Information, Address

California Investment Company

96 BROADWAY, NEW YORK



-OR-



304 PINE ST., SAN FRANCISCO




BKNK OF MKDERK



7tfIKDERK. FRESNO CO,



OFFICERS



D. M. TOMBLIN
J. E. NEWMAN
PAUL B. MAY



D. M. TOMBLIN
J. E. NEWMAN



Capital Stock
paib up Capital



President

Cashier

Asst. Cashier



DIRECTORS



H. C. DATJLTON



R. L. HARGROVE

f. v. Mcdonald



$100,000

5o,ooo



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Tf)e Nicaragaa Canal



AND



OTHER ESSAYS



BY



Richard H. /^cDopzvId, Jr.

Vice-President of the Pacific Bank, of San Francisco.



PRESS NOTICES



The articles give ample proof that Mr. McDonald is
a pungent and incisive writer, and, while some cannot
agree with his conclusions, all must admire his style
and the masterly use of the English language.— Wasp,
San Francisco.

The essays are very ably written and reflect great
credit on Mr. McDonald. The work is highly commend-
able and invaluable to all who wish to be well informed
on the political and economic quest ions of the day upon
which it treats.— Times, Pleasanton.

One of the clearest and comprehensive reviews of the
Nicaragua Canal is furnished by Richard II. McDonald,
Jr., and should be read by every American citizen
who has the interests of his country at heart.— Argus,

Adin.

The work is artistic from a typographical point of
view, ami t lie subject matter is treated in a terse, schol-
arly manner.— Express, Winters.

The writer is undoubtedly a scholarly, but what
amounts to a great deal more, a thinking man. One
would suppose that the topics which he dismisses had
been utterly exhausted by this time, hnt all of his
essaysareso very mast erf ullv handled, that they appear
decidedly new, to an attentive reader. Mr. McDonald
has the ability to make even a dry subject interesting
reading, and in that respect he surpasses the many
writers on political economy.— Independent, Santa
Barbara.

Mr. McDonald holds to a high conception of the duties
of citizenship, and no one can read his lines without
being impressed with the earnestness of his purpose.
Manifestly these papers are but the beginning of more
serious literary work.— Sun, San Diego.

The essays are not only worth reading, but the sub-
jects show that they art* deserving of careful study
and consideration by all interested in political and
economic topics.

•'The Nicaragua Canal and Other Essays." by Rich-
ard H. McDonald, Jr., is an intensely Interesting work
upon live questions of tl e i\a,y. —Gazettee, Los Angeles.

They are essays of great importance and such that
every "good citizen should have a copy to read and
study over.— Observer, Corning.

There are no higher class essay on leading public
questions than these. They are not written in a parti-
san spirit.— Times, Pomona.

The essavs show thought, and art- logical presenta-
tions of subjects from a Republican standpoint.— Argus,
Auburn.



We earnestly recommend them to our readers for
for careful perusal.— News, Rio Vista.

Mr. McDonald is a forcible writer and his essavs on
the great questions Of the day will be read by all who
take mii interest in the ad vancement and betterment
of our political, commercial and social usages.— Times,
Escondido.

These articles have already appeared in print and
attracted much attention on account of the recognized
ability with which the subject! were presented. Mr.
McDonald is a thorough student, and the salient
point! o the questions under discussion are brought
out clearly and forcibly.— Gazette, Martinez.

The contents are masterly essays on important ques-
tions of the day— topics of importance and interest to
every public-spirited person on this coast —written by
Richard 11. McDonald, Jr., vice-president of the Pa-
cific Bank of 8an Francisco, and reprinted trom pre-
the Calijornian Magazine.— Ojai ,



of



vious numbers
Nordhoff.

Those who are at all familiar with Mr. McDonald's
method of grappling with these important problems
will hail the appearance Of these essays with delight.
They are admirably written and get at the root of the
matter with charming distinctness. — New Era.
Monti

Mr. McDonald is a constant student, thinker and
writer upon the great questions of the day. In speak-
ing of the writings embraced in this volume, he says:
"If they aid in establishing better standards in po-
litical, commercial and social usage, in influencing
any citizen to take a tinner stand for all that is good
and right in public, then the purpose of the writer will
have been served."— Appeal, Marysville.

Richard H McDonald. Jr., vice president of the Pa-
cific Hank of San Francisco, has during the past few
months contributed to the Califnrman a number of in-
teresting and scholarly articles on the Nicaragua Canal
and other political and economic topics.— New Era,
Benicia.

These essays, besides discussing the Nicaragua Ca-
nal, cover quite a range of economic subjects, the
topics being "Is Labor in Danger?" "Regulation of
Railway Charges." "How to Secure Good Municipal
Government." " Political Duty of Californians," "Our
Commercial Growth and the tariff," from both a P.e-

fmblican and a Democratic standpoint: " Ballot Re-
orm" and "The Danger to the Republic." There is
much matter in the pamphlet for thoughtful people to
consider. — Times, Los Angeles.



PUBLISHED BY THE



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602 Market Street San Francisco, Cal.



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INCORPORHTED 1563.



R. H.Mc DONALD, President
FRANK V. MCDONALD, Cashier R. H. McDONALD, Jr., Vice-President



Pacific Bank,

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.



OLDEST CHARTERED COMMERCIAL BANK ON THE PACIFIC COAST



PAID-UP CAPITAL, IN GOLD
SURPLUS ....

AVERAGE RESOURCES
YEARLY VOLUME OF BUSINESS



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letters of credit for use of travelers, available in all parts of the world.

Telegraphic Transfers in Cipher made in I/ondon, Paris, 3erlin and
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Drafts issued on Australia and the Orient.

Dividends and Coupons collected.

Bullion bought and sold.

Orders executed for all Investment Securities.

State, County, City and Water Bonds negotiated.

Approved Business]Papers discounted or received as Security for I/oans.

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Collections on the Pacific Coast, Mexico, Central and South America,
New Zealand, India, China and Japan, handled at lowest rates, with prompt-
ness and dispatch.

Bills drawn on Union Bank of I^ondon, Credit I,yonnais, Paris, and
Direction der Disconto Gesellschaft, Berlin, and other important cities of
Europe.









IMEIpads"' SSM^K"



WHEN YOU TRAVEL



TSKB TUB



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The Shortest Line between



SOUTH€RN CALIFORNIA ANP THE EAST



WO * OVERLAND TRAINS • ^)Ai ^Y



Pullman Palace and Tourist Sleeping Cars through to
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~>



THE MOST BEAUTIFUL SCENERY . .
THE MOST NOVEL SCENERY . . .

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THE BEST EATING HOUSES IN AMERICA



k~



Via the Great Santa Pe Route



No other line offers as many or as valuable advantages



fl 1 1 D M flTTfl ^ ne k es ^ accommodations for all classes at the lowest rates. For
UUn mill I U i tickets, berths and full information, call on any Santa Fe
Route Agent, or write to

W. A. BISSELL, Cen'l Pass. Ag't A. & P. R. R. f San Francisco
S. B. HYNES, Cen'l Pass. Ag't S.C.Ry., Los Angeles



John Brown Colony

INCORPORHTED

MADERA - CALIFORNIA



A. F. JOHNS .. - - President and Manager

D. M. TOMBUN ..... Vice-President

J. E. NEWMAN - - - - - J -J. - Secretary

BANK OF MADERA Treasurer

PAUL B. HAY ...... Assistant Manager

H07USB OFFICE:

MADER A, FRESNO COUNTY , CAL I

7* BUSINESS PROPOSITION I

A Money Making Plan Based Upon Sound Principles

HrSTORY OP A GREAT UNDERTAKING

Four years ago the idea of the John Brown Colony was first suggested. So radically different
is it from the usual plan of colonization that it was nearly a year before much progress was made
in forming the colony. So many swindling schemes have been sprung upon the public in real
estate transactions, that people were slow to take advantage of this offer until they were thor-
oughly convinced that it would be honestly conducted. With the establishment of this fact the
lands were rapidly taken, until now the original tract is all subscribed for and in process of
cultivation.

PROFIT OF FRUIT-GROWING IN CALIFORNIA

The large profits realized by California fruit growers make a ten or twenty acre lot equal in]
value to a farm of a quarter section in the grain-growing States. The average yield is from $100
to $300 ner acre vearly, while exceptional cultivation and eome varieties of fruits bring the aston-
ishing yields of $500 to $1,000 per acre. The fruit industry, too, has been found to be one of the
safest and surest in the Unitea States. It is a common thing in the older colonies to find colonists
living in luxury upOn a twenty-acre tract, while those owning larger acreages are rapidly
accumulating wealth.

THE FIRST TRACT DISPOSED OF

As the above facts came to be generally understood, there was no delay on the part of the
people in taking these lands, so that in a very short time the entire tract of 3,060 acres was taken
in lots of five acres and upwards. One thousand acres was planted to raisin grapes in the winter
of 1890 and this winter ('90 and '91) the remaining 2,060 acres will be planted to grapes, figs and
other fruits.

LAND VALUES

The fact of such large profits from California lands, makes their cultivation mean far more
in this country than in those of the grain-growing States. Land that will yield a yearly income
of $100 per acre is worth at least $500 per acre. Estimating upon the basis of a ten per cent
profit upon the capital invested, it is worth $1,000, but to say $500 is making it strong enough.
Now grain growing land throughout the West is not worth more than $40 to $60 per acre and one
cannot take up new land worth $15 to $25 and make it worth in three or four years even $40,
unless it be in exceptional instances ; whereas in California, land that is worth $100 per acre raw,
is certainly worth $500 within three years' time if properly set to fruits and well tended, and
double that time will make it worth $1,000. This is one of the secrets of rapid money making in
California. The practical question, however, which presents itself to one unable to move to this
country, either from lack of means or from business, such that it is impossible to leave it for a
time is

HOW CAN I PROCURE SUCH A PLACE AND HAVE IT MADE TO PRODUCE WITHOUT MY

PERSONAL ATTENTION

We have solved this question in the plan of our colonies. We take a large tract, divide it
into small lots, taking five acres as our unit, and dispose of the whole tract in five acre lots, or of
any number of them in one body, asking only that the means necessary to plant out the land
and cultivate it for three years be paid as needed to perform the work. We do all the work and
care for the crops until they have yielded enough to pay for the land when it is then deeded to
the purchaser, costing him in actual cash outlay the price named for cultivation. He has not



^*C ^S^Srf^^S^S rKUll LAINUo °^^P^P%^% 37 N/^

needed to undergo the expense of removal, erection of buildings, cash payment upon land nor
1he many expenses incidental to individual operation. On the other hand, if he be a poor man,
} te is left at his regular employment, thus assuring him his support and enough means to keep up the
< xpense of cultivation, and when he is ready to remove to his land, it is yielding him a nice income
i nstead of demanding large outlays. Or, if one simply takes land in this colony as an investment
not intending to make it his home, he will procure a property which will yield him each year as
much as it has cost him in cash outlay. Thus it will De seen that while it brings within reach of
1he colonist all the advantages of the ordinary colony, it lessons the expense of acquiring such a
property to half or one-third the actual cash outlay usually required. The idea is that of
co-operation in all the expense until the property is brought up to a producing condition and the
land is paid for when it becomes the individual property of the subscriber. It is evident that to
purchase a large tract of land it may be had on better terms than a small one; also that by
uoing the work on a large scale, under one management, not only may the cost be brought down
much lower than if it were all done under individual ownership and management, but that more
uniform results may be secured, besides everyone knows that the greatest bar to individual
enterprise of this sort is the comparatively large outlay necessary to I egin. The great number of
]>eople who live upon a salary and never can save enough to undertake the work of procuring such
41 home is very large, and without such a plan as this they can never hope to become independent
land owners.

A FEW QUESTIONS ANSWERED

1. Our tract is from two to five miles from It. R. station.

2. It is two to five miles from Madera and twenty from Fresno.

3. Water rights are a part and parcel of the land and cannot be separated from it.

4. Water for domestic use is found at from 50 to 75 feet (surface water at 10 feet) of the
purest and best quality.

5. The elevation above sea level is 300 feet.

6. It is forty miles to the mountains and only 100 miles to the famous Yosemite Valley,
renowned all over the world for its remarkable scenery.

7. Plenty of deer are found in the mountains and foothills, and small game such as quail,
ducks, geese, rabbits, etc., abound in the valley. If you are of the dangerous, yellow-backed
sort, you can receive satisfaction by clambering up high into the mountains and encountering



Online LibraryCharles Frederick HolderThe Californian (Volume 4) → online text (page 42 of 120)