Charles Frederick Holder.

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is of such substance that rhyme and rhythm
seem rather to interfere with than aid in its
interpretation, though the philosophy itself
is, in many respects, good.

Ethianism, or the Wise Men Reviewed?
by F. J. Ripley, is a well written treatise
upon the different religions, philosophies
and sciences that attempt to solve the mys-
teries of the eternity of the past and future.
The author rather ridicules these efforts in a
way that is original and interesting, saying
that no conclusions can be drawn concerning
it, and that one can but project the unknown
past and future by his deductions from the
limited concatenation subject to his immedi-
ate inspection. But he also deprecates the
ignorance and arrogance of those who de-
clare there can be nothing more in the uni-
verse than that which they are able to see
and comprehend. The author has at-
tempted to give a comprehensive criticism
of the theories formulated by philosophy,
religion and science from a purely unbiased
standpoint. u The book," says the author,
" takes the position that truth is truth
wherever found, and that truth never con-
flicts with itself. Only error conflicts;
therefore, that if you expurged error from
science, philosophy and religion, leaving
only truth, as it is in them, there is and
could be no antagonism." He has endeav-
ored to Harmonize philosophy, religion and
science by eradicating their errors. As his
theories are not orthodox to any of them,
they necessarily conflict with them as to
these errors, but his effort has been to select
and accept the truth from each.

He says: " If you know better than God
how the world ought to have been created,
then it is a great pity you were not by to
advise. To affix a tail and prefix horns to
God, smearing him with Mason's blacking,
as some artists do, because, forsooth, the
God has not seen cause to attend exclusively
to man's interests in the matter of creation
is simply monstrous." ' ' Man is not born to
solve the mystery of existence, but he must
nevertheless attempt it in order that he
may learn to keep within the limits of the
knowable," are Goethe's words.

A fascinating study of the human soul
may be found in a book entitled Reincar-



nation*, by Jerome A. Anderson, M. D. F.
G. S. He quotes the words of Aristotle,
who says, concerning the existence, of the
soul, " It is decisive of the question whether
the soul exists, if among the activities and
emotional states of our being are to be
found such as do not belong to our bod <

The author sets forth his view s co n cer n ing
reincarnation, uniting the most beautiful
ethics with logical argument. He explains
naturally the phenomena of hypnotism,
mesmerism and the still greater subjer
animal and spiritual magnetism, carrying
his readers far into the world of occultism.

He says, *' But once admit the fact of
reincarnation, and observe how the S]
ent chaos of injustice chsngefl into tin-
most beautiful harmony. Apparentrj
cordant and irreconcilable phenomena are
marshaled into orderly array. Confo
and injustice disappear and life urtmwft a
deeper and more significant meaning. The
terrible inequalities of birth, utterly inex-
plicable by the single birth, and still more
so by the materialistic hypothesis, are
shown to be the result of causes set in oper-
ation by the soul itself in former incarna-
tions and not the careless or stupid incapac-
ity of some personal god playing at creation
and making a sad niess of it."

Shelly, whose beautiful countenance has
been described by Chas. Edwin Markham,
the poet, as a "wrapt seraphic face," dis-
plays in his work a tender strength and
aspiration to grasp those truths and flu
of mental revelation that so often elude, yet
he has a st nsitiveness that is almost a misfor-
tune to him. Wrapt in etherealness, his
spirit was easily hurt coming in contact with
the vigor and roughness of the world.
While he and Byron were in Italy, the
stronger spirit of Byron dominated and
absorbed him. He was unable to write at
the time, while Byron composed some of
his most exquisite and delicate productions.
Shelby's constant aspiration is expressed in
his exquisite melodious burst of song " To
a Skylark."

" Hail to thee, blithe spirit '
Bird thou never wcrt,
That from heaven, or near it,
Pourest thy full heart
In profuse strains of unpremeditated art.
* m * * • • •

" Teach me half the gladness
That my brain must know.
Such harmonious madness
From my lips would flow
The world should listen then, as I am listening

G. U B



1 Chas. H. Kerr & Co., 175 Monroe St., Chicago, 111.
Constitution Publishing Company.Atlanta, Georgia.



3 The Lotus Publishing Co.
San Francisco, Cal.



1504 Market Street




THE OLD MAN SINGS.

BY E. M. STORK V.

There's a wabble in the jingle and a stumble in the meter,

And the accent might be clearer and the volume be completer,

And there might be much improvement in the stress and intonation,

And a polish might be added to the crude pronunciation :

But there's music like a harper played before the ancient kings,

When the old man plays the fiddle and goes feeling for the strings;

There is laughter chocked with tear drops when the old man sings.

And we form a ring around him, and we place him in the middle,
And he lings up to his withered cheek the poor old broken fiddle.
And a smile comes on his features as he hears the strings' vibration,
And he sings the songs of long ago with fathering intonation ;
And a phantom from the distant past his distant music brings,
And trooping from their dusty graves come long-forgotten things,
When he tunes the ancient fiddle and the old man sings.

We let the broken man play upon the broken fiddle,

And we press around to hear him as he sits there in the middle ;

The sound of many wedding bells in all the music surges —

Then we hear their clamor smothered by the sound of funeral dirges.

'Tis the story of his lifetime that in the music rings —

And every life's a blind man's tune that's played on broken strings;

And so we sit in silence while the old man sings.




BAKINGPOWDER pgBSST^

-Cr.Q^Kft^TeNb____ 4 \



6*



PapmAQ f nr Alio-Mct Bv Marion Harland, Miss Parloa,

rcecipes Turnugubi^ Mrs , Rorer and Mr8- Lincoln>



It is a great thing to have a pure and
wholesome baking powder, the ingredients of
which are printed on each label, so that one
may know what he is eating. Such is
Cleveland's Baking Powder, — it is pure.




"Ifs

Pu re

<X7ld

Sure.



%WWOft



Breakfast Fruit Cake.— By Marion Harland.— 1 quart of flour, 2 cups of ailk, 'itade-
spoonfuls of butter, 1 tablespooniul of lard, £ teaspoonful salt, 1 quart of strawberries, hackle-
berries, blackberries or raspberries, £ cup of sugar, 2 teaspoonfuls of Cleveland's baking \\o\\ d»«r.
Sift flour, baking powder and salt together, chop Id the shortening, stir in the milk with a
wooden spoon. The dough should be just stiff enough to handle. Roll into two sheets, line
a baking pan with one, put in the berries, strew with sugar, lay on the other sheet and bake.
Cut into squares, split and eat hot with sugar and butter. Use only Clev eland's bukiiKj fmim -.

Luncheon Muf-
fins.— I ; y Maria Parloa.
— For one dozen muffins
use one pint of Boot,
a generous half pint
of milk, two tea-
snoonfuls of Cleveland's
Baking Powder. h:ilf |
teaspoonful of salt, two
t nblt spoonfuls of sugar,
three tablespoonfuls of
butter and two egfii
Mix the dry ingri
together and rub through
a sieve. Melt flu butter.
Beat the eggs till light
and add the milk to
them. Add this mixture
to the dry ingredients:
then stir in toe melted
butter. Beat the bat i. r
vigorously tor a few sec-
onds and then pal in
buttered muffin
and bake for about twen-
ty minutes in a quick
oven.— (Copyright.) U$e
t „thi Cleodm

powd' r.

Plum Roll. -By

Mrs. S. T. Rorer.—
Principal Ph ilad e lp h i a

Cooking School.— Add 1
teaspoonful of Cleve-
land^ baking powder
and i teaspoonful of salt
to 1 pint of sifted Hour.
Sift again. Rub in 1
tablespoon ful of butter,
add sufficient milk to
make a soft done-!
out, spriukle with 1 MB
of chopped raisins ami
i cup of chopped
Dust with cinnamon, roll
up and steam fox
utes. Serve warm with
hard sauce. Use only
L Uvthi ucCs baking powder.

Blueberry Muf-
fins.-l*y Mrs. D. A.
Lincoln— Author Boston

them
lakniLT




"ICs
Pure
and

Sure. 1



It is a great thing, when cake and biscuit
are put into the right sort of an oven, to be
always sure they will come out just right.

Such is the case every time if you use
Cleveland's Baking Powder,— it is sure.

A quarter pound can mailed free on receipt of 15 cents in stamps.
Cleveland Baking Powder Co., 81 Fulton St., New York.



Cook itoofc-Pick over, wash and dry 1 pint blueberries ; •p^J*^*^J^^PJ^^K^SilS.5%rt

from settling in the dough. Mix well 1 .teaspoonful salt, fj^^spo



powder and £ cup sugar, with 1 quart sifted flour. Rub in % cup butter
cups milk, or enough to make a dough that will keep m shape
when dropped from a spoon. Stir in the prepared blueberries,
being careful not to mash them. Drop by the large spoonfuls
on a well buttered shallow pan, or in round muffin pans.
Bake about 20 minutes, and serve hot with butter it lor
^breakfast or tea, or with cream if for luncheon— (Copyright).



Moisten with about 1



400 Recipes



free.



Send iUnij> »n<)



Cleveland Baking Powder Co.,

81 Fulton St.. New York



NEWSPAPER FUN



An Oregon editor who had a dog for
sale advertised as follows : Good family
dog for sale. Will eat anything. Is
very fond of children.



" Binkles and his girl have had an-
other falling out." "Is it possible?
What caused it?" "Defective ham-
mock . " — Washington Star.



Jones. — I'm quite a near neighbor of
yours, now, Mrs. Golightly. I've taken
a house on the river." Mrs. G. " Oh !
Well, I hope you'll drop in some day."
' — Exchange.

vStill in Doubt.— First Little Girl.
" Has your sister begun takin' music
kssons yet?" Second Little Girl.
" She's takin' somiin' on th' piano ; but
I can't tell yet whether it's music or
type-writiu' . " — The Daily Traveller,

It has long been our candid conviction
that if all the dogs in the world were
boiled down into one, there would be in
the result the making of a very noble
man. On the other hand, we fancy that
if all the men in the world were boiled
down into one there would be in the re-
sult the making of a precious poor dog.
— Eugene Field.



A tall red-whiskered man with a slouch
hat and frontier accent walked up to the
boxoffice of the Schiller Theater, in Chi-
cago, one night lately and demanded two
seats. He informed the treasurer that
he was Mayor of Missoula, Mont., and
wanted to be treated accordingly. He
was told that a good seat would be pre-
sented to him if he had the price. As he
slipped the tickets into his pocket he
said, "What time does the show be-
gin?" "At 8:15, sir." "Well, if I
aint here on time don't wait for me ; I'll
drop in afore long." — Exchange,



Parent. — "And does my daughter
really love you ? " Chappie. "Dearly
sir!" Parent (reflectively): "I pre-
sume so, poor, frank-hearted little Katie !
She could love most anything ! "' — Dem-
ocrat Chro?iicle.

" I had a fearful dream last night. I
dreamed I was riding along a lonely
road " —

"What on?"

" A nightmare." — Texas Si/ti?igs.

An Irish sergeant was drilling a squad
of militia recruits, whose ideas of march-
ing in line were altogether original.
Getting utterly disgusted- at their irregu-
larity he bawled : " Halt ! Just come out
and look at \onrsilves. It's a foine line
you're leaping, isn't it?" — Tit-Bits.

Happy Bridegroom. "Waiter, I want
dinner for two." Waiter. " Yill ze
lady and gentleman haf table d'hote or a
la carte f " I [appy Bridegroom " (gener-
ous to a fault, but weak in French):
" Bring us some of both and put lots of
gravy on 'em. — Judy.

Sir John Lubbock quotes two gems
from Parliamentary speeches ; one by a
Highlander who said of an appropriation
that it was a "mere flea bite in the
ocean." Another Scotch member re-,
marked that "you may depend on it,
sir, the pale face of the British soldier is
the backbone of the Indian army."

It is the man who never saw the in-
side of a printing office who knows the
most about editing a paper, the man
who never had any business of his own
who can give others business pointers,
and the man who never batted a ball
who can tell just how a game of base
ball ought to be played. .What a suc-
cessful world this would be if the folks
who know it all would put their knowl-
edge into practice ! — Boston Transoipt.



18



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ORANGE AND LEMON INDUSTRY

IN RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA

Is a crowning success, has become a truism, and that

^mngton4{eights

A TRACT OP 50A\H 4,000 ACRES
Is THI£ G^M of Riverside's crown, is equally true.

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HOMESEEKER, are now being offered on ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, at reasonable prices, and
on easy terms.

A perpetual and abundant water right in the "GAGE CANAL SYSTEM " (one inch to
each five acres) is sold with these lands. This water right is practically free, and is equal to a
rainfall of thirty-five inches per annum.

Some thirteen of the twenty -two miles of the canal of this system are already lined with
concrete, and the water is distributed throughout ARLINGTON HEIGHTS in steel pipes, and
delivered on the highest corner of each lot.

Flowers, fruits and vegetables flourish and mature on ARLINGTON HEIGHTS every
month of the year.

Riverside is famed for her churches and schools, and ARLINGTON HEIGHTS boasts of
one of the finest of the latter.

The main line of the Santa Fe R. R. between Chicago and San Diego runs parallel and
adjacent to ARLINGTON HEIGHTS, affording three stations.

These lands are now being offered at reasonable prices, and on easy terms.

For map and pamphlet accurately describing these lands, address,

THE RIVERSIDE TRUST CO., Limited

RIVERSIDE, CALIFORNIA.



Tf)e Pen- (l> order's Maelstrom.



F. Marion Crawford, hi ''The Three Fates."



Among the many consequences of en-
tering upon a literary life is the losing
forever of the feeling that any moment
there is nothing to be done. L,et a
writer work until his brain reels and his
fingers can no' longer hold the pen, he
will, nevertheless, find it impossible to
rest without imagining that he is being
idle. He cannot escape from the devil
that drives him, because he is himself
the driver and the driven, the fiend and
his victim, the torturer and the tortured.
I^et physicians rail at the horrible eon
sequences of drink, of excessive smok-
ing, of opium, of chloral and of mor-
phine — the most terrible of all stimulants
is ink, the hardest of taskmasters, the
most fascinating of enchanters, the breed
er of the sweetest dreams and of the
most appalling nightmares, the most in-
sinuating of poisons, the surest of de-
stroyers. One may truly venture to say
that of an equal number of opium-eaters
and professional writers, the opium-eat-
ers have the best of it in the matter 1 4
long life, health and peace of mind.
We all hear of the miserable end of the
poor wretch who has subsisted for years
upon stimulants or narcotics, and whose



death, often at an advanced age, is held
up as a w r arning to youth ; but who ever
knows or speaks of the countless deaths
due solely to the overuse of pen, ink and
paper? Who catalogues the names of
those many whose brains give way before
their bodies are worn out ? Who counts
the suicides brought about by failure,
the cases of men starving because they
would rather write bad English than do
g< n >d work of any other sort ? In pro-
portion to the whole literary profession
of the modern world, the deaths alone,
without counting other accidents, are
more numerous than those caused by
alcohol among drinkers, by nicotine
among smokers, and by morphine and
like drugs among those who use them.
For one man who succeeds in literature,
a thousand fail, and a hundred, who
have looked upon the ink when it was
black and cannot be warned from it,
and whose nostrils have smelled the
printer's ease, are ruined for all use-
fulness and go drifting and struggling
down the stream of failure till death or
madness puts an end to their sufferings.
And yet no one ventures to call writing
a destroying vice, nor to condemn poor
scribblers as " ink drunkards."




20



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MANUFACTURERS

^•n^r^" FURNITURE

638-640 Mission St., San Francisco






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[Formerly under Occidental Hotel) SAN FRANCISCO



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INSURANCE




THE MUTUAL LIFE INSURANCE COMPANY

OP NEW YORK
RICHARD A. McCURDY, President

Statement for the year ending December 31st, 1892



Assets, $175,084,156 61

Reserve for Policies (American Table 4 Per Cent.)
Miscellaneous Liabilities ....

Surplus ......

Income

Premiums .... $32,047,765 34

Interest, Rents, &c. . . 8,15)1,095)90



$159,181,067 00

734,855 67

15,168,233 94



$40,238,865 24



To Policy-Holders

For Expenses and Taxes



Disbursements

$19,386,532 46
7,419,611 08



$26,806,143 54



The Assets are Invested as follows



United States Bonds and other Securities

Loans on Bond and Mortgage, first lien

Loans on Stocks and Bonds

Real Estate ......

Cash in Banks and Trust Companies
Accrued Interest, Deferred Premiums, &c.

Insurance and Annuities

Insurance Assumed and Renewed

Insurance in Force .....

Annuities in Force ....



Increase in Annuities in Force

Increase in Payments to Policy-Holders

Increase in Receipts ....

Increase in Surplus

Increase in Assets ....

Increase in Insurance Assumed and Renewed

Increase in Insurance in Force



$65,820,434 89
. 69,348,092 54
10,35)4,597 50
. 15,638,884 26
7,806,672 55
. 6,075,474 87
$175,084,156 61

$654,5X)9,566 OO

745,780,083 OO

352,036 Ol

$82,732 98

630,820 60

2,604,130 71

3,137,266 78

15,577,017 93

47,737,765 OO

50,25)5,925 OO



Note— In accordance with the intention of the Management as announced in November, 1891, to limit the
amount of new insurance actually issued and paid for in the accounts of the year 1892, to One Hundred Million
Dollars, the amount of insurance In force as above stated includes the amount of such Voluntary limit with but
a slight increase unavoidable in closing the December accounts.

I have carefully examined the foregoing Statement and find the same to be correct

A. N. WATERHOUSE, Auditor

From the Surplus a dividend will be apportioned as usual

BOARD OR TRUSTEES

George Bliss



Samuel D. Babcock
George S. Coe
Richard a. McCurdy
James C. Holden
Hermann C. Von Post
Alexander H. Rice
Lewis May
Oliver Harriman



Henry W. Smith
Robert Olyphant
George F. Baker
Dudley Olcott
Frederic Cromwell
Julien T. Davies
Robert Sewell
S. Van Rensselaer Cruger
Charles R. Henderson



Rufus W. Peckham

J. HOBART HERRICK

Wm. P. Dixon
Robert A. Granniss
Henry H. Rogers
Jno. W. Auchincloss
Theodore Morford
William Babcock



STUYVE8ANT Fl8H

Augustus D. JuillIard
Charles E. Miller
Walter R. Gillette
James E. Granniss
David C. Robinson
H. Walter Webb
George G. Haven



ROBERT A. GRANNISS, Vice-President
WALTER R. GILLETTE, General Manager
ISAAC F. LLOYD, 2d Vice-President FREDERICK SCHROEDER, Assistant Secretary

WILLIAM J. EAST0N, Secretary HENRY E. DUNCAN, Jr., Cor. Secretary

FREDERIC CROMWELL, Treasurer
JOHN A. FONDA, Assistant Treasurer
WILLIAM P. SANDS, Cashier

EMORY McCLINTOCK,
JOHN TATLOCK, Jr., Assistant Actuary



JAMES TIMPSON, 2d Assistant Treasurer
EDWARD P. HOLDEN, Assistant Cashier
LLD., F.I.A., Actuary

CHARLES B. PERRY. 2d Assistant Actuary
WILLIAM G. DAVIES, General Solicitor WILLIAM W. RICHARDS, Comptroller

Medical Directors
ELIAS J. MARSH, M.D.



GUSTAVUS S. WINSTON, M.D.

For particulars apply to



GRANVILLE M. WHITE, M.i



A. B. FORBES

Gknkkal Agent, Pacific Coast

401 California Stroet. S, F






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In I in U inOlIIUlL Girls; Seventeen Teachers. For
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W EST NKWTON ENGLISH and CLASSI-
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Address

NATHAN'L T. AM I N
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J. L. VAN DERWERKER, ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR AT LAW

CITY ATTORNEY, YUMA, ARIZONA

I am making a specialty of the law of Land, Mining and Water Rights including mining litigation and
conducting proceedings to obtain patents; the perfecting and protection of titles to mineral lands.

The clearing of titles to water rights, the establishment and confirmation of priorities of parties to water
courses and water rights.

Bonds, Conveyances, Mortgages, Deeds of Trust, Articles of Incorporation of mines and water rights prepared.

Legal investigation made for trustees and bondholders preliminary to bonding.

Loans Negotiated.

Write or call and your business will receive prompt attention.



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If it is not worth its price to you, it can be
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Send for an illustrated price-list with testimonials.
Agents "Wanted. Mention The Californian

M AG AZINK.

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Tf)e Nicaragua Canal

AND

OTHER ESSAYS

BY

RicbaH H. A\cDonzvIcl, Jr.

Vice-President of the Pacific Bank, of San Francisco.



press notices



The articles give ample proof that Mr. McDonald is
a pungent and incisive writer, and. while tome cannot
agree with his conclusions, all must admire his style
and the masterly use of the English language.— Wasp,
San Francisco.

The essays are very ably written and reflect prreat
credit on Mr. McDonald. The work is highly commend-



Online LibraryCharles Frederick HolderThe Californian (Volume 4) → online text (page 63 of 120)