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able and invaluable to all who wish to be well informed
on tiie political and economic questions of the day upon
which it treats.— T/m€8.Pleasanton.

One of theclearest and comprehensive reviewsof the
Nicaragua Canal is furnished by Richard II. McDonald,
Jr., and should te read by every American citizen
who has the interests of his country at heart.— Argus,
Adin.

The work Is artistic from a typographical point of

view, and the subject matter is treated in a terse, schol-
arly manner.— -Express, Winters.

The writer is undoubtedly a scholarly, but what
amounts to a (Treat deal more, a thinking man. One
would suppose that the topiCfl Which he discusses had

been utterly exhausted by this time, but all of his
essays arc so very masterfully handled, that they appear
decidedly new, 10 an attentive reader. Mr. McDonald
has t lie ability to make ev» n a dry subject Interesting
reading, and In that respect he surpasses the many
writers on political economy.— Independent, Santa
Barbara.

Mr. McDonald holds to a hiph conception of the duties
of citizenship, and no one can read his lines without

being Impressed With the earnestness of his purpose.

Manifestly these papers are hut the beginning of more
serious literary work.— Sun, San Diego.

The essays are not only worth reading, but the sub-
jects show that they are deserving of careful study
and consideration by all interested in political and
economic topics.

•'The Nicaragua Canal and Other Essays," by Rich-
ard II. McDonald, Jr., is an intensely Interesting work
upon live questions of tie day. Oaseffee, bos Angeles.

Thev are essays of great importance and such that
every 'good citizen should have a copy to read and
study over.— Observer, Corning.

There are no higher class essay on leading public
questions than these. They are not written in a parti-
san spirit.— Timet, Pomona.

The essavs show thought, and are logical presenta-
tionsof subjects from a Republican standpoint.— Argug,
Auburn.



We earnestly recommend them to our readers for
for careful perusal.— News, Rio Vista.

Mr. McDonald is a forcible writer and his essays on
the great questions of the day will be read by all who
take an interest in the advancement and betterment
of our political, commercial and social usages.— Times,
Escondido.

These articles have already appeared in print and
attracted much attention on account of the recognized
ability with which the subjects were presented. Mr.
McDonald is a thorough student, and the salient
points 01 the questions under discussion are brought
out clearly and forcibly.— Gazette, Martinez.

The contents are masterly essays on important ques-
tions of the day— topics of importance and interest to
every public-spirited person on this coast— written by
Richard H. McDonald, Jr., vice-president of the Pa-
cific Bank of San Francisco, and reprinted Irom pre-
vious numbers of the Calif ornian Magazine.— Ojai,
NordlK.fr.

Those who are at all familiar with Mr. McDonald's
method of grappling with these important problems
will hail the appearance of these essays with delight.
They are admirably written and get at" the root of the
matter with charming distinctness. — New Era,
Monterey.

Mr. McDonald is a constant student, thinker and
writer upon the great questions of the day. In speak-
ing of the writings embraced in this volume, he says:
"If they aid in establishing better standards in po-
litical, commercial and social usage, in influencing
any citizen to take a firmer stand forall that is good
and riiiht in public, then the purpose of the writer will
have been served."— Appeal, Marysville.

Richard H McDonald. Jr., vice president of the Pa-
cific Bank of San Francisco, has during the past few
months contributed to the Californian a number of in-
teresting and scholarly articles on the Nicaragua Canal
and other political and economic topics.— New Era,
Benicia.

These essays, besides discussing the Nicaragua Ca-
nal, cover quite a range of economic subjects, the
topics being "Is Labor in Danger?" "Regulation of
Railway Charges." " How to Secure Good Municipal
Government." " Political Duty of Californians." "Our
Commercial Growth and the tariff." from both a Re-
publican and a Democratic standpoint; "Ballot Re-
form "and "The Danger to the Republic." There is
much matter in the pamphlet for thoughtful people to
consider.— Times, Los Angeles.



PUBLISHED BY THE



CALIFORNIAN PUBLISHING CO.

No. 916 Market Street.



For Sale by all Booksellers



Price, 30 Cents.



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INVESTMENT * BANKER
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Makep and Negotiates Loans on Real Estate and Ap-
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First-Class Securities for Investors always on hand.
Transacts a General Ileal Estate Business.
Taxes paid and property managed for resident and
ion-resident owners. Collections made and promptly
emitted.
We Solicit Correspondence and cheerfully give Information.
Pamphlet on Southern California sent free on appli.
ation.

3 South Raymond Ave., Pasadena, Cal.



$w&nLer<5'5



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CALIFORNIA MARKET

Pine Street Entrance
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65 CENTS PER CAN

H. ROSENLUND. . Manager




SEE THEfl SPARKLE!

v V J / / I , PREP I To Introduce our great •

\\jiUJ/s rnttS page. 48 column Illua-

V^5JW5v • >» trated "Weekly family story paper,
Katublistaed 1887. we have de-
aiueil to Give Away, free of all cott,
$ 1 0,000 worth of the costly and
handsome rings here shown. Each we
fully guarantee to wear well, to be
Heavy Rolled Gold and REAL
STONES— not "paste. " " gl ass' or
other imitation. OUROFFKR: To
7-STONt CLUSTtn each person who sends us ft forasii
months (26 weeks) trial subscription to our paper, we will send
tilker of these rings free of cost. Club of two. %r, club of sis and
six rings, $5. Exactly as represented, . i|
in every particular, or your money Os. \ '
cheerfully refunded. Nothing could ^^ J-
be fairer. fXT* Measure your finger **
with a slip of paper. Mind.we will not
sell these rings at any price. Our circu-
lation has already oecome national;
but we are not satisfied; we want
everybody to see and read our paper.
We refer to any bank or newspaper in

America. EncloseadollarbiM in vour SoilT»i»r B"H» '»*T
letter and address. ROCKY MouNTA IN SKKTtHKL. Den ver.Col.

The largest Curio Store on the

PACIFIC COAST.

Complete line of California,
INCORPORATED Indian and Mexican Curios,
Shells, Mosses, Wood Goods, Indian Baskets,
Brackets, Silver Filigree and Mexican Opals ;
also a complete line of Japanese and Chineso
curios. Send for a Kiro or Japanese Hand
Warmer and Headache Cure. Sent by mail
for 20c. together with one package of fuel.
Correspondence solicited.




KAN-KOO



110 S SPRING ST.



LOS ANGELES, CAL.



+^S\ l^'^^"3^?~2 — t?r>f trr r amino — ^^^S^^WZ^ "I N^

XrowMk? FRUIT LANDS MNS^Ns L/0

John Brown Colony

INCORPORHTED

MADERA - CALIFORNIA



A. F. JOHNS - - - President and Manage:

D. M. TOMBLIN - - - Vice-Presiden

J. E. NEWMAN - - - - Secretar 3

BANK OF MADERA Treasure:

PAUL B. HAY .. - - Assistant Manage:

HOMB OFFICE:

MADER A, FRESNO COUNTY, CAL I

K BUSINESS PROPOSITION

A Money Making Plan Based Upon Sound Principles

HISTORY OP A GREAT UNDERTAKING

Four years ago the idea of the John Brown Colony was first suggested. So radically differenl
is it from the usual plan of colonization that it was nearly a year before much progress was made
in forming the colony. So many swindling schemes have been sprung upon the public in real
estate transactions, that people were eIow to take advantage of this offer until they were thor-
oughly convinced that it would be honestly conducted. With the establishment of this fact the
lands were rapidly taken, until now the original tract is all subscribed for and in process of
cultivation.

PROFIT OP FRUIT-GROWING IN CALIFORNIA

The large profits realized by California fruit growers make a ten or twenty acre lot equal in
value to a farm of a quarter section in the grain-growing States. The average yield is from .$100
to $300 per acre vearly, while exceptional cultivation and some varieties of fruits bring the aston-
ishing yields of $500 to $1,000 per acre. The fruit industry, too, has been found to be one of the
safest and surest in the United States. It is a common thing in the older colonies to find colonists
living in luxury upon a twenty-acre tract, while those owning larger acreages are rapidly
accumulating wealth.

THE FIRST TRACT DISPOSED OP

As the above facts came to be generally understood, there was no delay on the part of the
people in taking these lands, so that in a very short time the entire tract of 3,060 acres was taken
m lots of five acres and upwards. One thousand acres was planted to raisin grapes in the winter
of 1890 and this winter ('90 and '91) the remaining 2,060 acres will be planted to grapes, figs and
other fruits.

LAND VALUES

The fact of such large profits from California lands, makes their cultivation mean far more
in this country than in those of the grain-growing States. Land that will yield a yearly income
of $100 per acre is worth at least $500 per acre. Estimating upon the basis of a ten per cent
profit upon the capital invested, it is worth $1,000, but to say $500 is making it strong enough.
Now grain growing land throughout the West is not worth more than $40 to $60 per acre and one
cannot take up new land worth $15 to $25 and make it worth in three or four years even $40,
unless it be in exceptional instances; whereas in California, land that is worth $100 per acre raw.
is certainly worth $500 within three years' time if properly set to fruits and well tended, and
double that time will make it worth $1,000. This is one of the secrets of rapid money making in
California. The practical question, however, which presents itself to one unable to move to this
country, either from lack of means or from business, such that it is impossible to leave it for a
time is

HOW CAN I PROCURE SUCH A PLACE AND HAVE IT MADE TO PRODUCE WITHOUT MY

PERSONAL ATTENTION

We have solved this question in the plan of our colonies. We take a large tract, divide it
into small lots, taking five acres as our unit, and dispose of the whole tract in five acre lots, or oi
any number of them in one body, asking only that the means necessary to plant out the land
and cultivate it for three years be paid as needed to perform the work. We do all the work anc
care for the crops until they have yielded enough to pay for the land when it is then deeded U
the purchaser, costing him in actual cash outlay the price named for cultivation. He has not



FRUIT LANDS




needed to undergo the expense of removal, erection of buildings, cash payment UDon land i.
the many expenses incidental to individual operation. On the other hand, if lie be a poor man




not intending to make it his home, he will procure a property which will yield him each vear as
much as it has cost him in cash outlay. Thus it will be seen that while it brings within reach of
the colonist all the advantages of the ordinary colony, it lessons the expense of acq ui ring such a
property to half or one-third the actual cash outlay usually required. The idea is tint of
co-operation in all the expense until the property is brought up to a producing condition and the
land is paid for when it becomes the individual property of the subscriber. It is evident that to
purchase a large tract of land it may be had on better terms than a small one; also that by
uomg the work on a large scale, under one management, not only may the cost be brought down
much lower than if it were all done under individual ownership and management, but that more
uniform results may be secured, besides everyone knows that the greatest bar to individual
enterprise of this sort is the comparatively large outlay necessary to I egin. The great number of
people who live upon a salary and never can save enough to undertake the work of procuring such
a home is very large, and without such a plan as this they can never hope to become independent
land owners.

A FEW QUESTIONS ANSWERED

1. Our tract is from two to five miles from R. R. station.

2. It is two to five miles from Madera and twenty from Fresno.

3. Water rights are a part and parcel of the land and cannot be separated from it.

4. Water for domestic use is found at from 50 to 75 feet (surface water at 10 feet) of the
purest and best quality.

5. The elevation above sea level is 300 feet.

6. It is forty miles to the mountains and only 100 miles to the famous Yosemite Valley,
renowned all over the world for its remarkable scenery.

7. Plenty of deer are found in the mountains and foothills, and small game such as quail,
ducks, geese, rabbits, etc., abound in the valley. If you are of the dangerous, yellow-backed
sort, you can receive satisfaction by clambering up high into the mountains and encountering
bruin.

8. The rainy season begins in October and ends in April. It does not rain all the time but
as much as it does in the East during the summer.

9. The climate is fine for consumptives if they come in time for it to help them . Rheumatism ,
Catarrh and kindred troubles are usually helped.

10. Fog is almost unknown here in the summer and it only occurs in winter during damp
weather during which times it will be foggy in any land.

11. The sea breeze reaches us in the afternoon, blowing from the northwest.

12. The soil of the land we offer is alluvial, deep and strong.

13. Good oak wood is sold at six dollars accord.

14. Groceries and provisions are a little higher than in the East in some items. Flour and
meat are about the same price.

15. Lumber is worth from $15 for refuse to $35 per M. for best.

16. Wages for farm ".laborers are $30 per month and board, the man furnishing his own
blankets.

17. There is less danger from earthquakes than there is in the East, and none at all from
lightning, which is seldom seen.

18. Strawberries can be had ten months out of twelve.

19. Good teachers can always find a position. Teachers' wages range from $60 to $125 pet
month.

20. All attainable Government land is of rugged nature, not capable of irrigation, far dis-
tant from business centers, and it would require more capital to settle on it than is required for
settlement inclose neighborhoods.

21. Our land is entirely level, has no brush, trees nor stones upon it and is free from
alkali.

22. While at Washington and Philadelphia people fall dead in the streets with the ther-
mometer at 90 degrees in the San Joaquin valley the hay harvest is gathered in absolute safety
with the thermometer at 110 degrees. The exceedingly dry atmosphere promotes rapid evapora-
tion which works this apparent wonder.

If you desire land in this colony, send the money to Bank of Madera, Treasurer, $900 per
five acre lot if you wish it planted this winter, otherwise $150 which will secure you the lot and
out it in preparation for planting to the best of advantage next year. Send money by bank
draft. Do not send personal checks as it costs exchange to collect them.

List of colonists and references to our reliability furnished upon request. Address

The John Brown Colony, Madera, California



The COLORADO

GLENWOOD
^ SPRINGS • • •

COLORADO
WALTER RAYMOND (of Raymond's Excursions, Boston, Mass.,) Proprietor





The finest hotel in the West, in the
heart of the Rocky Mountains. Fine
hunting, fishing; a perfect climate;
the ideal summer resort in the heart
of the Rocky Mountains, in the midst
of the finest scenery in North America.

Pure air, salt water baths, etc., and
all the luxuries of life in the Rocky
Mountains.

The Colorado is on the Denver and
Rio Grande and Colorado Midland
R. R. at an altitude of 5,200 feet above
the sea.



For particulars address



K. N. BHILEY



^



MANAGER THE COLORADO GLENWOOD SPRINGS
COLORADO






jstf* y?&V%!&V \^



RAILROAD S



a^.fo?p.£sNb



WHEN YOU TRAVEL



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~>



THE MOST BEAUTIFUL SCENERY . .
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Tbe GflLlfORfllflfi

Tbe Grefct Advertising 111 * 1 J /T\

medium of tbe p^ific iiiustr&teq iiJ&£&zii)e

51o P c - SAM FRANCISCO, CAL.

Do You Wish to Reach the Moneyed People of the

Pacific Slope ?

If so, it will pay you to patronize the Californian Illustrated
Magazine of San Francisco.

The Californian has the largest circulation of any magazine of
the first class published west of New York.

The Californian is seen monthly by over a quarter of a million
persons, and is the best advertising medium in Western North
America.

Manufacturers in the East find it the most valuable medium
through which to reach Pacific Coast buyers and consumers.

The Pacific Slope has grown with phenomenal strides within the
last ten years ; towns and cities have sprung up like magic, and
thousands of happy homes dot the fertile valleys.

The Californian Magazine can be found in most of these homes ;
it is the popular home magazine, and the only Illustrated Magazine
that has been accorded rank with the Century, Harper's, Cosmopolitan
and Scribner's, published in Western North America or west of New
York.

The Californian is the leading literary monthly of the West.



ADVERTISING RATES

PER INSERTION

Whole page - - $100 00 Sixteenth Page - - $ 6 50

Half " - 50 00 Second Inside Cover Page 200 00

Quarter Page - - 25 00 Third Cover Inside Page - 200 00

Eighth " - - - 12 50 Fourth Cover Outside Page 250 00 <

Preferred position next to reading 15 per cent extra

10 per cent discount on contracts for six months

25 per cent discount on contracts for one year

Monthly change of copy allowed on time contracts.

THE CALIFORNIAN ILLUSTRATED MAGAZINE

916 MARKET STREET, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.

Eastern Agent, Frank S. Gray, Room 12, Tribune Building, N. Y.
Southern Agent, Geo. F. Granger, Burdick Block, Los Angeles, Cal.
London Agent, Brentano, 5 Agar St., London.



rS ^SSESSf MISCELLANEOUS '$§WM " 7 Wr



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Will find Burnham's Clam Bouillon bet-
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NESTLINGS



■ ■ POEHS ON CHILDREN
-by-
ELLA FRASER WELLER



The Successful Book of the Season.
Beautifully and fully illustrated.

For Sale by all Booksellers.

Price, #1.50.

Sent Postpaid by

T&* California PuMfrbiujr (o.

9 1 6 /Market Street

San Francisco



H^^i^^^^i BANKS ^Pll^^ll^ 34 kr



DEPOSITS AS SMALL AS $1.00 RECEIVED.













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^



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SAW FRANCISCO
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%



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$1,000,000.00
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Married Women and Children may deposit money subject to their conta
All accounts confidential. Interest credited twice a year and comment

with date of deposit.

Open from O.OO a. m. to 3.00 p. m. on week days and on Monday a

Saturday evenings from 6.30 to 8.30.



Any one interested In finance does not fail to find
the study of the stamp system ot savings one in which
there is much food for thought. Undoubtedly it is the
best system in the world to encourage
small savings.

In Germany it has resulted In the
hoarding up of millions of marks
by the poor people, who call down
blessings upon its originator.
. The 5-cent stamp system is in full
operation at the P'.-ople's Home
Savings Bank, and those who have
investigated it are convinced of its
efficacy.

About llpoo stamp-saving book3
have been issued by the bank to
feople s lome Stamp. the p eo ple of San Francisco. In
each book are ten or fifteen deposit cards, and when
enough stamps have been purchased from time to time
to fill one ol the cards, that card is worth a dollar at
the People's Home Savings Bank, 805 Market Street,
corner 4th. As an object lesson in saving to the youth
of the land the stamp system is invaluable.




The People's Home Savings Bank has adopt
very effective plan foraccumulatingagoodsumof mc
by small savings. The bank has a large nurabe
small nickel-plated safes, oblong in shape and at
half the size of an ordii
cigar-box. These will c
hold about $35 in silver c
and their use is becon
general in San Francisco,
get a safe, you simply dep
a dollar with the Peoj
Home cashier and tak
home, where you drop ii
occasional dime or more,
■.IIYniH^'ieT DU '' Jl wake up some morning
find that you have $3.
surplus coin on hand,
only way you can get at this is to take the little
to the People's Home Savings Bank, where the ke
kept, aud there unlock it. The dime-savers then dej i
the money in the People's Home Savings Bank, 1
thus lay the foundation for a fortune.— San Fraiu
Chronicle,




A special feature of the People's Home Savings Bank is the Safe Deposit Vaults; the strongest witli
exception on the Coast: easy of access, being on the ground floor of the Bank; brilliantly lighted with arc >
incandescent lights, and secure and convenient for the inspection of valuables.

Individual Steel Safes, inside the Vaults, may be secured at rentals of from $4.00 to $20.00 per annum. «
smallest safe is large enough 6»r your Insurance Policies, your Will, Stocks, Bonds, a good deal of coin, and c 1
a supply of Jewelry.

Rooms are furnished the depositors for the private inspection of valuables, where they can lock themselvel
from all intrusion.

Down stairs are absolutely fire-proof and burglar-proof vaults with capacity for storing amounts of silvern*
trunks and boxes containing furs, laces, clothing and other valuables.



JOHN E. FARNUM.

Manaoer and Secretary.



COLUft*3US WATERHOUSE,

Presio I



INTEREST WORKS WHILE YOU SLEEP.



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Send for my new catalogue and mention The California Illustrated Maoazink.



A NEW BGDK



* ¥ BY * *



Charles Frederick Holder, \SL, % D.

EDITOR OF THE CALIFORNIAN

Along the Florida. Reef

D. APPL.ETON €r CO., NEW YORK, PUBLISHERS



PRESS NOTICES



"Dr. Holder has written a perfectly fascinating
account hard to lay down when once be^un."— The



Online LibraryCharles Frederick HolderThe Californian (Volume 4) → online text (page 64 of 120)