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healthy, bright, and active, and to grow

up happy, robust, and vigorous.



The BEST FOOD for Hand-fed Infants, In-
valids, Convalescents, Dyspeptic-,
and the Aged is

MELLIN'S FOOD

For Infants and Invalids.

Our Book for the instruction of mothers,

"The Care and Feeding of Infants,"

will be mailed free to any address upon
request.

DOLIBER-GOODALE CO.,

BOSTON, MASS.



Siftii^gs fron} Y exas -



SHORT AND SWEET.

Eternal assessment is the price of polit-
ical victory.

Japan boasts of a singing fish. It lias
musical scales, we suppose.

The parlor is probably the most fre-
quented of all court rooms.

An itching for notoriety is not enough
to secure a niche in the temple of Fame.

Talk about fine women in Boston !
There are morphine women in New York
than Boston ever dared to have

Some claim that the pulley is the old-
est mechanical invention, but probably
the crowbar has a pryer claim.

JUST I.IK1C Till; INDIAN.

Doosenbury — Has the Chinaman any



A SERIOUS CHARGE.

u Did you see that latest photograph
of Chauncey Depew ?"

"Yes, he reminds me of a burglar who
visited my house and went oft with a
valuable painting. Chauncey always did
take a good picture."

A HAD BREAK.

Infuriated subscriber (to editor) —
What does this mean, sir ?

Kditor— What does what mean ?

" In this obituary notice of my respect-!
ed wile's mother, you have said she was
■ consigned to her last roasting place.- '

A CYNIC.

Mis. Boulevard — The Infanta took a
great interest in the Chicago Fair. She
is a close observer.

Mr. Boulevard — Humph ! all women
are elothes observers.

Here is a hint from Confucius for the



rights in this country ?

Birdwhistle— He has of course, but Ik- 1>al,k Pendente: '" ()ur greatest -lory is

gets left when he tries to assert them. not ,n P ever lall,n - but in nslH - a - ain

every time we tail."



In the bright lexicon of youth there is

no such word as fail, but later on when
he goes out west and starts into business
for himself, then the word shows iip in
good shape.

Russell Sage does not appreciate the
witicisms that are still going the round
about that dynamite bomb. Some pe< >ple
like the schoolmaster when tie sits down
on a pin, never appreciate a good point



I



Many keep their reputations polished
only that they may outshine their neigh-
bors.

Shakespeare never billed his plays.
Vet he builded better than he knew,
Bill did.

Envy is an acknowledgment of tl
good fortune of others.



M





%.





MISCELLANEOUS "~1§11"T]|£.

~~-J^s^??s(cj?ri?. 4 V^



IUP IU0TITI1TC Boarding and Day School for
'IrlU lnOlllUIL Girls; Seventeen Teachers. For
istrated Catalogue, address

Rev. E. B. CHURCH, Principal

Valencia Street San Fbanciw q



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY



l»r . Kl.en Tmirjcc OF MUSIC
The Leading Conservatory

>i<iar Frre.

Frank w. hai.k, «.. -i» i Mfr , Boston, H



Director
of Aim



WKSTMWTON I N«.l i>|| .,,„, « , \ss|
CAI, 14 ikmil. ALLS* Brother*.
foil; of this family school for

boys and girls will begin on Wedm-
Sept. ao, 1S9:;. Piaparei for <-«.iu.k«'. i
for business. Attention !<• character building.
Address

. \ \ I II \\ I I \l I I N

w . .1 N.wton, Ma»i.



. ni. FIELD. Yuma. Arizona



Dealer in Real Estate, Investment Broebr, Q

ERNMENT LAND LOCATIONS, WATER RlGHTS AND ClTY

Property Secured. Citrus and I um,

Vines and Tanning Root La



Wester:



(8,'93)



"A

Waterman

Ideal Fountain Pen

is not only a pocket pen and a
supply of ink all complete and
ready for i?isfa?it use, to carry
with you whether you go to the

World's Fair

or elseivhere, for business or
pleasure, but it is ahvays and
everywhere the best writing
instrument you can have."
If it is not worth its price to you, it can be
relumed and the money zvillbe refunded.

Send for an illustrated price-list with testimonials.

Agents Wanted. Mention The Californian
Magazine.

Branch: J. B. Tukey, 175 Wabash Ave.,

Chicago, 111.

L. E. WATERMAN CO.

157 Broadway, New York




.GLUTE. N

SUPPOSITORIES



CURE C(



)NSTIPATI0N

AND PILES



NUMBER I FOR ADULTS

NUMBER 2 FOR BABIES

The Surest. Simplest, Safest Remedy on earth.
No purgatives, no cathartics, no laxatives, to
destroy the stomach, bat strengthening, up-
building, local nutrition.

50 CENTS. FREE BY MAIL

SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS



HEALTH

FOOD

CO.



<;i 1 1FTH AVKNI7K, NewYork
199 TRKMONT STREET, Ronton
632 ARCH ST., Philadelphia
1601 WABASH AVE., Chicago



<<



ioTooA°[oO> 0(0 °j° Co Vr^P



BANKS k^skMr " 26 LX>




Pjctnh of Aadera

MADERA, FRESNO CO.



D. B. TOMBIJN
J. A. NEWMAN
PAUL B. HAY



Capital Stock
paib up Capital



President

Cashier

Secretary



$100,000

5o,ooo



EXCHANGE ISSUED ON ALL IMPORTANT CITIES

Letters of Credit for use of Travelers, Approved Business Paper Discounted or

Received as Security for Loans, Correspondence Solicited, Collections

Promptly Made, Dividends and Coupons Collected.






MISCELLANEOUS






The highest degree of brilliancy is imparted to Gold and Silver Plate by
Constant use for nearly 25 years proves it harmless in every way.

REDINGTON & CO., SAN FRANCISCO. SOLE AGENTS FOR PACIFIC COAST.



WILLIAM R. STAATS

NVESTMENT* BANKER
and BROKER

Deal" in Choice Mortgage Securities,
Bonds and Stocks.

Make? and Negotiates Loans on Real Estate and Ap-
proved Collateral.

First-Class Securities for Investors always on hand.
Transacts a General Real Estate Business.

Taxes paid and property managed for resident and
non-resident owners. Collections made and promptly
remitted.

We Solicit Correspondence and cheerfully give Information.

Pamphlet on Southern California sent free on appli-
cation.
12 South Raymond Ave., Pasadeaa, Cat,



DON'T

READ

THIS



Unless you know HOW
to appreciate an excep
tionally good offer.



NOTE, THEN, THAT FOR



$3-00



YOU CAN OBTAIN A SUBSCRIPTION FOR ONE YKAR TO

"THE TRAVELER"

AND Till;

Californian [Uastrated
Aaga^inc

*$-The regular price oi each magazine taken separately
is $4.00. If ordered together, I3.00, and you have two
of the handsomest and most interesting magazines
published on the Pacific Coast. Sample copy of the
Califoriilan, 25 cents.

Address,

JOHNSTONE & BRYAN
602 Market Street San Francisco, Cal.



SEE THEM SPARKLE!

SKSBsteirwe

$ 1 0,000 worth oftrtc cottly and

handsome rings here shows. Each w*
fully -




mat Ml to ha




T-StoncClustcr each person who tends us {1 fart sis

months (36 weeks) trial subscription to our paper, we will send

either of these rings free o/cost. Cluboftwo.fa; club erf sis and
six rings, $5. Exactly as represented, . 1

in every particular, or your money ^V \ \
cheerfully refunded. Nothing could ^^y-4*.
be fairer. (Jj* Measure your finger -
with a slip of paper. Mind, we will not
sell these rings at any price. Our circu-
lation has already Decotne national;
but we are not satisfied; we want
everybody to see and read our paper.
We refer to any bank or newspaper in

America. Enclose a dollar l>iU in vmir SoilTaiNr B"Ul*ANT
letter and address. Rocky MountaihSkktihel. Den ver.Coi.

The largest Curio Store on the

PACIFIC COAST.

Complete line of California,
INCORPORATED T ndian and Mexican Curios,

Shells, Mosses, Wood Goods, Indian Baskets,
Brackets, Silver Filigree and Mexican Opals ;
also a complete line of Japanese and Chinese
curios. Send for a Kiro or Japanese I
Warmer and Headache Cure. Sent by mail
for 20c. together with one package of fuel.
Correspondence solicited.



KAN-KOO



110 8 SPRING ST.



LOS ANGELFS. r-«



Oyster House

CALIFORNIA MARKET

Pine Street Entrance
ALL KIWDS Or OYSTERS

Eagle "Brand Frozen Oysters

65 CENTS PER CAN

H. ROSENLUND, • Manager



<x^mMMMM fruit lands fwllll ■ lx>

John Brown Colony

INCORPORKTED

MADERA - CALIFORNIA



DR. W. JENNINOSON .... . President

D. M. TOMBLIN - - - Vice-President

J. E. NEWMAN - ... Secretary

BANK OF MADERA - - - Treasurer

PAUL B. HAY - - - Assistant Manager

HOTCB OFFICE!

MADERA, FRESNO COUNTY, CAL
K BUSINESS PROPOSITION I

A Money Making Plan Based Upon Sound Principles

HISTORY OP A GREAT UNDERTAKING

Four years ago the idea of the John Brown Colony was first suggested. So radically different
is it from the usual plan of colonization that it was nearly a year before much progress was made
in forming the colony. So many swindling schemes have been sprung upon the public in real
estate transactions, that people were slow to take advantage of this offer until they were thor-
oughly convinced that it would be honestly conducted. With the establishment of this fact the
lands were rapidly taken, until now the original tract is all subscribed for and in process of
cultivation.

PROFIT OP FRUIT-GROWING IN CALIFORNIA

The large profits realized by California fruit growers make a ten or twenty acre lot equal in
value to a farm of a quarter section in the grain-growing States. The average yield is from $100
to $300 per acre yearly, while exceptional cultivation and some varieties of fruits bringthe aston-
ishing yields of $500 to $1,000 per acre. The fruit industry, too, has been found to be one of the
safest and surest in the United States. It is a common thing in the older colonies to find colonists
living in luxury upon a twenty-acre tract, while those owning larger acreages are rapidly
accumulating wealth.

THE FIRST TRACT DISPOSED OP

As the above facts came to be generally understood, there was no delay on the part of the
people in taking these lands, so that in a very short time the entire tract of 3,060 acres was taken
in lots of five acres and upwards. One thousand acres was planted to raisin grapes in the winter
of 1890 and this winter ('90 and '91) the remaining 2,060 acres will be planted to grapes, figs and
other fruits.

LAND VALUES

The fact of such large profits from California lands, makes their cultivation mean far more
in this country than in those of the grain-growing States. Land that will yield a yearly income
of $100 per acre is worth at least $500 per acre. Estimating upon the basis of a ten per cent
profit upon the capital invested, it is worth $1,000, but to say $500 is making it strong enough.
Now grain growing land throughout the West is not worth more than $40 to $60 per acre and one
cannot take up new land worth $15 to $25 and make it worth in three or four years even $40,
unless it be in exceptional instances ; whereas in California, land that is worth $100 per acre raw,
is certainly worth $500 within three years' time if properly set to fruits and well tended, and
double that time will make it worth $1,000. This is one of the secrets of rapid money making in
California. The practical question, however, which presents itself to one unable to move to this
country, either from lack of means or from business, such that it is impossible to leave it for a
time is

HOW CAN I PROCURE SUCH A PLACE AND HAVE IT MADE TO PRODUCE WITHOUT MY

PERSONAL ATTENTION

We have solved this question in the plan of our colonies. We take a large tract, divide it
into small lots, taking five acres as our unit, and dispose of the whole tract in five acre lots, or of
any number of them in one body, asking only that the means necessary to plant out the land
and cultivate it for three years be paid as needed to perform the work. We do all the work and
care for the crops until they have yielded enough to pay for the land when it is then deeded to
ihe purchaser, costing him in actual cash outlay the price named for cultivation. He has not



^3^^ ^^g"FRUIT LANDS aj^f^ O

led to undergo the expense of removal, erection of buildings, cash payment upon land nor
e many expenses incidental to individual operation. Ontheother hand, if he be a poor man
us lettat his regular employment,thus assuring him his BUpportand enough means to keep up the
pense of cultivation and when he is ready to remove to his land, it is yielding him a nice income
stead of demanding large outlays. Or, if one simply takes land in tliis colon vasan investment
)t intending to make it his home, he will procure a property which will yield him each vearas
luch asithascost him in cash outlay. Thus it will be seen that while it bringswithin reach of
•A colonist all the advantages of the ordinary colony, it lessons the expense of acquiring e
>perty to half or one-third the actual cash outlay usually required. The idea is tl
■operation in all the expense until the property is brought up to a producing condition and the
id is paid for when it becomes the individual property of the subscriber. It is evident that to
irehase a large tract of land it may be had on better terms than a small one; also that bv
ing the work on a large scale, under one management, not only ma v the cost be brought down
ich lower than if it were all done under individual ownership and management, hut that more
iform results may be secured, besides everyone knows that the greatest bar to indiv
iterprise of this sort is the comparatively large outlay necessary to I egin. The gnat nun,
ople who live upon a salary and never can save enough to undertake the work of procuring'
io*me is very large, and without such a plan as this they can never hope to become indep<
id owners.

A FEW QUESTIONS ANSWERED

1. Our tract is from two to five miles from R. R. station.

2. It is two to five miles from Madera and twenty from Fresno.

3. Water rights are a part and parcel of the land and cannot be separated frotn it.

4. Water for domestic use is found at from 50 to 75 feet (surface water at 10 feet) o( the
est and best quality.

5. The elevation above sea level is 300 feet.

6. It is forty miles to the mountains and only 100 miles to the famous Yosemite Valley,
renowned all over the world for its remarkable scenerv.

7. Plenty of deer are found in the mountains and foothills, and small game such M quail.
ducks, geese, rabbits, etc., abound in the valley. If you are of the dangerous, yellow lucked
sort, you can receive satisfaction by clambering up high into the mountains and encounti
bruin.

8. The rainy season begins in October and ends in April. Itdoes not rain all the time but
as much as it does in the East during the summer.

9. The climate is fine for consumptives if they come in time for it to help them. Rheumatism,
Catarrh and kindred troubles are usually helped.

10. Fog is almost unknown here in the summer and it only occurs in winter during damp
weather during which times it will be foggy in any land.

11. The sea breeze reaches us in the afternoon, blowing from the northwest.

12. The soil of the land we offer is alluvial, deep and strong.

13. Good oak wood is sold at six dollars a cord.

14. Groceries and provisions are a little higher than in the East in some items. Flour and
meat are about the same price.

15. Lumber is worth from $15 for refuse to $35 per M. for best.

16. Wages for farm laborers are $30 per month and board, the man furnishing his owa

17. There is less danger from earthquakes than there is in the East, and none, at all from
lightning, which is seldom seen.

18. Strawberries can be had ten months out of twelve.

19. Good teachers can always find a position. Teachers' wages range from $60 to $126 pet
month. .

20. All attainable Government land is of rugged nature, not capable of irrigation, fa
tant from business centers, and it would require more capital to settle on it than is required for
settlement in close neighborhoods. . . .

21. Our land is entirely level, has no brush, trees nor stones upon it and is free from
Jilkal i

22. While at Washington and Philadelphia people fall dead in the street* with the
mometer at 90 degrees in the San Joaquin valley the hay harvest is gathered in absolute safety
with the thermometer at 110 degrees. The exceedingly dry atmosphere promotes.rapid evapora-
tion which works this apparent wonder. r ^ ^^^

If you desire land in this colony, send the money to Bank of Madera, Treasurer, $500 por
five acre lot if you wish it planted this winter, otherwise $150 which will secure you the lot and
out it in preparation for planting to the best of advantage next year. Send money by bank
draft. Do not send personal checks as it costs exchange to collect them.

List of colonists and references to our reliability furnished upon request. Address

The John Brown Colony, Madera, California



^^v5°^^?^r^r^^ HOTELS ^&r^S^^^^^§. 30

The COLORADO

GLENWOOD
■ SPRINGS- ••

COLORADO
WALTER RAYMOND (of Raymond's Excursions, Boston, Mass.,) Proprietor



At




The finest hotel in the West, in the
heart of the Rocky Mountains. Fine
hunting, fishing; a perfect climate;
the ideal summer resort in the heart
of the Rocky Mountains, in the midst
of the finest scenery in North America.

Pure air, salt water baths, etc., and
all the luxuries of life in the Rocky
Mountains.

The Colorado is on the Denver and
Rio Grande and Colorado Midland
R. R. at an altitude of 5,200 feet above
the sea.



For particulars address



K. N. BMILEY



#



MANAGER THE COLORADO GLENWOOD SPRINGS
COLORADO



•^[PllSiP! MISCELLANEOUS liWff 7 '''!!



&L



>c^



A THINKING
MACHINE

Is what the brain is. It needs the nourish-
ment of a stimulating and natural food. There
is no product that contains more phosphorus and
calcium, food for the brain and nerves, than is to
be found in the active properties of clams. Your
physician will tell you that the claims made
for Burnham's Clam Bouillon are based on
physiological facts. Thinking men and women
with tired brains should use it at least twice a
day.





Never buy Clam Bouillon for the
sick, except in Glass Bottles



Grocers find Druggists 25c., 50c and
S1.00 sizes



NESTLINGS



. . POEHS ON CHILDREN

-by-
ELLA FRASER WELLER



The Successful Book of the Season.
Beautifully and fully illustrated.

For Sale by all Booksellers.

Price, $1.50.

Sent Postpaid by

Tb* Cfclifornifcn PuMi$bin£ <o.

9 1 6 fA*rk*t Street

San Francisco



1.5.P^.(^Q^.^5^i?!!?^^?^.^^V? U/i^^P^.^9^^t^?^R7^ f ^^

DEPOSITS AS SMALL AS $1.00 RECEIVED.



M* 10*****






r*



v



s



/



<$> SAFE DEPOSIT V^

4^f Cor. Market and Fourth Streets ^g £

SAW FRANCISCO
JPaoifio Bank, T*&ek&\xx?&r.





Capital Stock
Paid up in Cash
Subject to Call



$1,000,000.00
r 333,333.33
1 666,606.67



INTEREST PER ANNUM FOR LAST TWO YEARS



5.40 ON TERM DEPOSITS
4.50 ON ORDINARY DEPOSITS



Married Women and Children may deposit money subject to their control.

All accounts confidential. Interest credited twice a year and commences
with date of deposit.

Open from 9.00 a. m. to 3.00 p. m. on week days and on Monday and
Saturday evenings from 6.30 to 8.30.



Any one interested In finance docs not fall to find
the study of the stamp system ot savings one in which
there is much food for thought. Undoubtedly it is the
best system in the world to encourage
small savings.

In Germany it has resulted in the
hoarding up of millions of marks
by the poor people, who call down
blessings upon its originator.
. The 5-eent stamp system is in full
operation at the People's Home
Savings Bank, and those who have
investigated it are convinced of its
efficacy.

About llfioo stamp-saving books
have been issued by the bank to
reople s lome Stamp, the people of San Francisco. In
each book are ten or fifteen deposit cards, and when
enough stamps have been purchased from time to time
to fill one ot the cards, that card is worth a dollar at
the People's Home Savings Bank, 805 Market Street,
corner 4th. As an object lesson in saving to the youth
of the land the stamp system is invaluable.




The People's Home Saving* Bank has adopted a
very effective plan for accumulating a good sum of money
by small savings. The bank has a large number of
small nickel-plated safes, oblong in shape and about
half the size of an ordinary
cigar-box. These will each
hold about $35 in silver coin,
and their use is becoming
general in San Francisco. To
get a safe, you simply deposit
a dollar with the People's
Home cashier and take it
home, where you drop in an
occasional dime or more, and
wake up some morning to
find that you have $35 of
surplus coin on hand. The
only way you can get at this is to take the little safe
to the People's Home Savings Bank, where the key is
kept, and there unlock it. The dime-savers then deposit
the money in the People's Home Savings Bank, and
thus lay the foundation for a fortune. — San Francises
Chronicle.




A special feature of the People's Home Savings Bank is the Safe Deposit Vaults ; the strongest without
exception on the Coast; easy of access, being on the ground flcor of the Bank; brilliantly lighted with arc and
incandescent lights, and secure and convenient for the inspection of valuables.

Individual Steel Safes, inside the Vaults, may be secured at rentals of from $4.00 to $20.00 per annum. The
smallest safe is large enough &*t your Insurance Policies, your Will, Stocks, Bonds, a good deal of coin, and quite
a supply of Jewelry.

Booms are furnished the depositors for the private inspection of valuables, where they can lock themselves la
from all intrusion.

Down stairs are absolutely fire-proof and burglar-proof vaults with capacity for storing amounts of silverware,
\ containing furs, laces, clothing and other valuables.



trunks and boxes containing furs, laces, clothing and other valuables.



JOHN E. FAR1MUM,

Manager and Secretary.



COLUrV,3US WATERHOUSE,

President.



INTEREST WORKS WHILE YOU SLEEP.






t^t^t:^P4^P4 BOOKS ^t^M^^ ;:;: t^



>a "°



The Nicaragcta Canal



OTHER ESSAYS



Richard H. A\cDor>aIcl, J r .

Vicr-Pri-.sidf.nt of THE Pacific Bank, of San Prah<



PRESS NOTICES



The articles give ample proof that Mr. McDonald is
a pungent and incisive writer, and, while some cannot
agree with his conclusions, all must admire hi* style
and the maserly use of the English language.— Wasp,
Kan Francisco.

The essays are very ably written and reflect great
credit on Mr. McDonald. The work is highly commend-
ahle and invaluable to all who wish to he well informed
on the political and economic questionsof the day upon
which it treats.— Times. Pleasanton.

One of the clearest and comprehensive reviews of the
Nicaragua Canal is furnished hy Richard II. McDonald,
Jr., and should te read by every American citizen
who has the interests of his* country at heart.— Argus,
Adin.

The work is artistic from a typographical point of
view, and the subject matter is treated in a terse, schol-
arly manner.— Express, Winters.

The writer is undoubtedly a scholarly, but what
amounts to a great deal more, a thinking man. One
would suppose that the topics which he discusses had
been utierly exhausted by this time, but all of his
essays are so very masterfully handled, that they appear
decidedly new, to an attentive reader. Mr. McDonald
has the ability to make even a dry subject interesting
reading, and in that respect he surpasses the many
writers on political economy.— Independent, Santa
Barbara.

Mr. McDonald holds to a high conception of the duties
of citizenship, ami no one can read his lines without
being impressed with the earnestness of his purpose.
Manifestly these papers are but the beginning of more
serious literary work.— Sun, San Diego.

The essays are not only worth reading, but the sub-
jects show that they are deserving of careful study
and consideration by all interested in political and
economic topics.

•'The Nicaragua Canal and Other Essays," by Rich-
ard H. McDonald, Jr., is an intensely interesting work
upon live questions of t! e day.— Ga'zettee, Los Ang< les.

They are essays of great importance and such that
every "good citizen should have a copy to read and
study over.— Observer, Corning.

There are no hierher class essay on leading puMio
questions than these. They are not written In a parti-
san spirit.— Time*, Pomona."

The essays show thought, and are logical presenta-
tions of subjects from a Republican standpoint.— Argus,
Auburn.



We earnestly recommend them t.. our reader* for
for careful perusal.- \tw 8 , Rio Vista.

Mr. McDonald is a forcible writer and
the great questions of the day will sll who

take an interest in the advancement an-i belt*
of our political, commercial and social usages
Escondido.

These articles have already appeared In print and

attracted much attention on account of t.
ability with which the subjects were pr<



Online LibraryCharles Frederick HolderThe Californian (Volume 4) → online text (page 83 of 120)