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THE LIBRARY
OF

THE UNIVERSITY

OF CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES



GIFT OF

FREDERIC THOMAS BLANCHARD

FOR THE
ENGLISH READING ROOM




yi*



HARRY LORREQUER.



HARRY LORREQUER



Bl

CHARLES LEVER

AUTHOR OF "CHARLES O'MALLKY"



We talked of pipe-clayregulation caps

Long twenty-foursshort culverins and mortals-
Condemned the ' Horse-Guards' for a set of raps,

And cursed our fate at being in such quarters.
Some smoked, some sighed, and some were heard to snore,

Some wished themselves five fathoms 'neath the Solway J
And some did pray who never prayed before

That they might get the ' route ' for Cork or Gal way."



WITH ILLUSTRATIONS



LONDON

GEORGE ROUTLEDGE & SONS

BROADWAY, LUDGATI HILL
NEW YORK: 416 BROOME STREET



CHARLES LEVER'S WORKS.

THE "HARRY LORREQUER" EDITION.
In Crown Zvo, with Illustrations.



Harry Lorrequer.

Jack Hinton.

Charles O'Malley, vol. i.

Charles O'Malley, vol. 2.

Con Cregan.

The O'Donoghue.

Tom Burke, vol. I.

Tom Burke, vol. 2.

One of Them.

The Daltons, vol. I.

The Daltons, vol. 2.

The Knight of Gwynne, vol. I.

The Knight of Gwynne, vol. 2.

Arthur O'Leary.

Roland Cashel, vol. I.

Roland Cashel, vol. 2.

Barrington.



The Dodd Family, vol. x.

The Dodd Family, vol. a.

Luttrell of Arran.

Davenport Dunn, vol. i.

Davenport Dunn, vol. 2.

The Bramleighs of Bishop's Folly.

Lord Kilgobbin.

The Martins of Cro' Martin, vol. i.

The Martins of Cro' Martin, vol. 2.

That Boy of Norcott's.

The Fortunes of Glencore.

Sir Jasper Carew.

Maurice Tiernay.

A Day's Ride : A Life's Romance.

Tony Butler.

Sir Brooke FosbrooV .

Horace Templetoa.



/> /

rr '



PEE FACE.



THAT some thirty years after the sketches which form this
volume were written I should be called on to revise and re-
edit them is strange enough to me ; well remembering, as I
do, with what little hope of permanence they were penned,
how lightly they were undertaken, and how carelessly thrown
together. But there is something still stranger in the retro-
spect, and that is, that these same papers for originally they
were contributed as articles to the Dublin University Maga-
zine should mainly have directed the course of my future
life, and decided my entire career.

I may quote from a former preface that I was living in a
very secluded spot when I formed the idea of jotting down
these stories, many of them heard in boyhood, others con-
structed out of real incidents that had occurred to my friends
in travel, and some again as the adventures of Trevanion and
the French duellist for instance actual facts well known to
many who had formed part of the army of occupation in
France.

To give what consistency I might to a mass of incongruous
adventure, to such a variety of strange situations befalling on*



1462611



Vi PBEFACfl.

individual, I was obliged to imagine a character, which pro-
bably my experiences and they were not very mature at the
time assured me as being perfectly possible ; one of a strong
will and a certain energy, rarely persistent in purpose and
perpetually the sport of accident, with a hearty enjoyment of
the pleasure of the hour, and a very reckless indifference as to
the price to be paid for it. If I looked out on my acquaint-
ances, I believed I saw many of the traits I was bent on
depicting, and for others I am half afraid I had only to take a
peep into myself. If it is an error, then, to believe that in these
Confessions I have ever recorded any incidents of my own life,
there is no mistake in supposing that without being in the
least aware of it in sketching Harry Lorrequer, I was in a
great measure depicting myself, and becoming, allegorically,
an autobiographist.

Here is a confession which, if thirty odd years had not
rolled over, I might be indisposed to make, but time has
enabled me to look back on my work, and even on myself as
I wrote it, with a certain degree of impartiality ; and to feel,
as regards both, as the great Paley said a man feels after he
has finished his dinner : " That he might have done better."

It is perfectly unnecessary that I should say when and
where I wrote these sketches ; no thought of future author-
ship of any kind occurred to me, far less did I dream of
abandoning my profession as a physician for the precarious
livelihood of the pen. Indeed, their success, such as it was,
only became known to me after I had left Ireland and gone to
live abroad, and it was there at Brussels my publishers
wrote to me to request a continuance of my Confessions, with



PREFACE. Vii

the assurance they had found favour with the world, and
flattering notice from the Press. Though I have been what
the sarcastic French moralist called " blessed with a bad
memory" all my life, I can still recall the delight I cannot
call it less with which I heard my attempt at authorship
was successful. I did not awake, indeed, "to find myself
famous," but I well remember the thrill of triumphant joy with
which I read the letter that said " Go on," and the entrancing
ecstasy I felt at the bare possibility of my one day becoming
known as a writer. I have had, since then, some moments in
which a partial success has made me very happy and very
grateful, but I do not believe that all these put together, or
indeed any possible favour the world might mete to me, would
impart a tithe of the enjoyment I felt on hearing that Harry
Lorrequer had been liked by the public, and that they had
asked for more of him.

If this sort of thing amuses them, thought I, I can go on for
ever ; and believing this to be true, I launched forth with all
that prodigal waste of material which, if it forms one of the
reasons of the success, is, strictly speaking, one among the
many demerits of this story. That I neither husbanded my
resources, nor imagined that they ever could fail me, were
not my only mistakes ; and I am tempted to show how little
I understood of the responsibilities of authorship by repeating
what I have told elsewhere, an incident of the last number of
Harry Lorrequer. The MSS. which contained the conclusion
of the story had been sent through the Foreign Office bag
from Brussels, and possibly had been mistaken for a despatch.
At all events, like King Theodore's letter, it had been thrown

6 2



nil PREFACE.

to one side and forgotten. In this strait my publishers wrote
to me in a strain that the trade alone knows how to employ
towards an unknown author.

Stung by the reproaches, and they were not mild, of my
correspondent, I wrote back, enclosing another conclusion,
and telling him to print either or both as he pleased. Years
after, I saw the first sent MSS., which came to hand at last,
bound in my publishers' library, and lettered "Another
ending to H. L."

When the great master of fiction condescended to inform
the world on what small fragments of tradition or local
anecdote the Waverley Novels were founded, he best exalted
the marvellous skill of his own handiwork in showing how
genius could develop the veriest incident of a life into a story
of surpassing power and interest. I have no such secrets to
reveal, nor have I the faintest pretension to suppose the public
would care to hear about the sources from which I drew
either my characters or my incidents. I have seen, however,
Buch references to supposed portraiture of individuals in this
story, that I am forced to declare that there is but one
character in the book of which the original had any existence,
and to which I contributed nothing of exaggeration. This is
Father Malachi Brennan. The pleasant priest was alive when
I wrote the tale, and saw himself in print, and worse still
in picture, not, I believe, without a certain mock indignation,
for he was too racy a humourist, and too genuine a lover of
fun, to be really angry at this caricature of him.

The amusing author of "The Wild Sports of the West"
Hamilton Maxwell was my neighbour in the little water-



PREFACE. IX

ing-place where I was living, and our intimacy was not the
less close from the graver character of the society around us.
\Ve often exchanged our experiences of Irish character and
life, and in our gossipings stories were told, added to, and
amplified in such a way between us that I believe neither of
us could have pronounced at last who gave the initiative
of an incident, or on which side lay the authorship of any
particular event.

It would have been well had our intercourse stopped with
these confidences, but unfortunately it did not. We often
indulged in little practical jokes on our more well-conducted
neighbours, and I remember that the old soldier from whom
I drew some of the features I have given to Colonel Kam-
worth, was especially the mark of these harmless pleasantries.
Our Colonel was an excellent fellow, kind-hearted and hos-
pitable, but so infatuated with a propensity to meddle with
every one, and to be a partner to the joys, the afflictions, the
failures, or the successes of all around him, that with the best
possible intentions and the most sincere desire to be useful to
his neighbours, he became the cause of daily misconceptions
and mistakes, sowed discord where he meant unity, and, in
fact, originated more trouble and more distrust than the most
malevolent mischief-maker of the whole country side.

I am forced to own that the small persecutions with which
my friend Maxwell and myself followed the worthy Colonel,
the wrong intelligence with which we supplied him, par-
ticularly as regarded the rank and station of the various
visitors who came down during the bathing season ; the false
.scents on which we sent him, and the absurd enterprises on



X PREFACE.

which we embarked him, even to the extent of a mock address
which induced him to stand for the "borough" the address
to the constituency being our joint production all these
follies, I say, more or less disposed me, I feel sure, to that
incessant flow of absurd incident which runs through this
volume, and which, after all, has really little other than the
reflex of our daily plottings and contrivings.

I believe my old friend the Colonel is still living ; if he be,
and if he should read these lines, let him also read that I have
other memories of him than those of mere jest and pleasantry
memories of his cordial hospitality and genial good nature
and that there are few things I would like better than to meet
and talk with him over bygones, knowing no one more likely
to relish a pleasant reminiscence than himself, nor more
certain to forgive a long-past liberty taken with him.

If there are many faults and blunders in this tale which I
would willingly correct, if there be much that I would curtail
or cut out altogether, and if there be also occasionally incidents
of which I could improve the telling, I am held back from any
attempts of this kind by the thought that it was by these
sketches, such as they are, I first won that hearing from the
public which for more than thirty years has never deserted
me, and that the favour which has given the chief pride and
interest to my life dates from the day I was known as Harry
Lorrequer. Having given up the profession for which, I
believe, I had some aptitude, to follow the precarious life of a
writer, I suppose I am only admitting what many others
under like circumstances might declare, that I have had my
moments, and more than mere moments, of doubt and mis-



PREFACE. SJ

giving that I made the wiser choice, and bating the intense
pleasure an occasional success has afforded, I have been led
to think that the career I had abandoned would have been
more rewarding, more safe from reverses, and less exposed to
those variations of public taste which are the terrors of all
who live on the world's favour.

Strangely enough, it is my old doctorial instinct which
should suggest the consolation to this passing regret. The
life of the physician has nothing so thoroughly rewarding,
nothing so cheering, so full of hearty encouragement, as in
the occasional friendships to which it opens the way. The
doctor attains to a degree of intimacy and stands on a foot-
ing of confidence so totally exceptional, that if personal
qualities lend aid to the position, his intercourse becomes
friendship. Whether, therefore, my old career gave me any
assistance in new roads, whether it imparted to me any
habits of investigation as applicable to the full in morals as
to matter, it certainly imparted to me the happy accident of
standing on good terms with I was going to say my
patient, and perhaps no better word could be found for him
who has heard me so long, trusted me so much, given me so
large a share of his favour, and come to look on me with
such friendliness. It would be the worst of ingratitude in
me if I did not own that I owe to my books not only the
pleasant intimacies of my life, but some of my closoa*.
friendships. A chance expression, a fairly shadowed
thought, a mere chord struck at random by a passing hand,
as it were, has now and then placed me, as mesmerists call
it, " en rapport " with some one who may have thought long



Ill PKEFACB.

and deeply on what I had but skimmed over ; and straight-
way there was a bond between us.

No small satisfaction has it been to me occasionally to
hear that out of the over abundance of my own buoyancy
and lightheartedness and I had a great deal of both long
ago I have been able to share with my neighbour and given
him part of my sunshine, and only felt the warmer myself.
A great writer one of the most eloquent historians who
ever illustrated the military achievements of his country
once told me that, as he lay sick and care-worn after a fever,
it was in my reckless stories of soldier life he found the
cheeriest moments of his solitude ; and now let me hasten
to say that I tell this in no spirit of boastfulness, but with
the heartfelt gratitude of one who gained more by hearing
that confession than Harry Lorrequer ever acquired by all
his own.

One word now as regards the task I am immediately
engaged in, and I have done.

My publishers propose to bring out in this edition a care-
fully revised version of all my books in the order in which
they were written ; each story to be accompanied by some
brief notice explaining the circumstances under which it
was written, and to what extent fact or fiction had their
share in the construction.

If such notices may occasionally be but leaves of an auto-
biography, I must ask my reader to pardon me, and to be-
lieve that I shall not impose my egotism upon him when it
be possible to avoid it, while at the same time he shall know
all that I myself know of the history of these volumes.



PREFACE. Xlll

If to go over again the pages I wrote so many years ago is
in a measure to revisit in age the loved scenes of boyhood ,
and to ponder over passages the very spirit of whose dicta-
tion is dead and gone if all this has its sadness, I am
cheered by remembering that I am still addressing many
old and dear friends, and have also for my audience the sous
and grandsons, and, what I like better, the daughters and
granddaughters, of those who once listened to Harry
Lorrequer.

CHAELES LEVER.

TRIESTE, 1872.



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER I.

PAGE

ARRIVAL IN CORK Civic FESTIVITIES PRIVATE THEATRICALS , . 1



CHAPTER IL
DETACHMENT DUTY THE "BURTON ARMS" CALLONBY ... 17

CHAPTER III.
LIFE AT CALLONBY LOVE-MAKING Miss O'Dowo's ADVENTURE . 29

CHAPTER IV.

BOTANICAL STUDIES THE NATURAL SYSTEM PREFERABLE TO THE

LINN.BAN 3S

CHAPTER V.
PUZZLED EXPLANATION MAKES BAD WORSE A DUEL ... 42

CHAPTER VI.

THE PRIEST'S SUPPER FATHER MALACHI AND THE COADJUTOR

MAJOR JONES AND THE ABBE 54

CHAPTER VII.
THE LADY'S LETTER PETER AND HIS ACQUAINTANCES Too LATE . 73

CHAPTER VIII.
CONGRATULATIONS SICK LEAVE How TO PASS THE BOARD , 83



XVI CONTENTS.



CHAPTER IX.

FAOg

TIIE ROAD TRAVELLING ACQUAINTANCES A PACKET ADVENTURE . >0



CHAPTER X.
UPSET MIND AND BODY ........ 95

CHAPTER XI.

CHELTENHAM MATRIMONIAL ADVENTURE SHOWING now TO MAKE

LOVE FOR A FRIEND . .101

CHAPTER XII.
DUBLIN TOM O'FLAHERTY A REMINISCENCE OF THE PENINSULA , 118

CHAPTER XIII.
DUBLIN TIIE BOARDING-HOUSE SELECT SOCIETY . . . .131

CHAPTER XIV.
THE CHASK 144

CHAPTER XV.
HEMS. OF THE Nor.TH CORK ........ 153

CHAPTER XVI.
THEATRICALS . , . .105

CHAPTER XVII.
THE WAGER 175

CHAPTER XVIII.
THE ELOPEMENT . 139

CHAPTER XIX.

DlTACHMENT Dui'V AN ASSIZE ToWN 194



CONTENTS. XV11

CHAPTER XX.
THE ASSIZE Tow* 20.7

CHAPTER XXI.
A DAY IN DUBLIN 213

CHAPTER XXII.

A NlOHT AT HOWTH 220

CHAPTER XXIII.
THE JOURSE! 226

CHAPTER XXIV.
CALAIS 232

CHAPTER XXV.

241



CHAPTER XXVI.
THE INN AT CHANTRATNF. 2^:j

CHAPTER XXVII.
Ma. O'LEARY 2Cu

CHAPTER XXVIII.
PARIS 277

CHAPTER XXIX.
PAP.IS . ....



CHAPTER XXX.
CAPTAIS TREVANIOS'S ADVESTUKE . 29<



XV111 CONTENTS.



CHAPTER XXXI.

PAOE

DIFFICULTIES . . 306



CHAPTER XXXII.
EXPLANATION 311

CHAPTER XXXIII.
Ma. O'LEARY'S FIRST LOVE 317

CHAPTER XXXIV.
Ma. O'LBART'S SECOND LOVE 325

CHAPTER XXXV.
THB DUEL 834

CHAPTER XXXVL
KAKLY RECOLLECTIONS A FIRST LOVK 346

CHAPTER XXXVII.
WISE RESOLVES ,353

CHAPTER XXXVIII.
THK PROPOSAL 359

CHAPTER XXXIX.

THOUGHTS UPON MATRIMONY IN GENERAL, AND IN THE ARMY IN

PARTICULAR THE KMGHT ov KERRY AND BILLY M'CABE . . 363

CHAPTER XL.
& REMINISCENCE . 368

CHAPTER XLI.
TJJE Two LEITKRS . , 879



CONTENTS. XIX



CHAPTER XLII.

PAGE

MR. O'LEARY'g CAPTURE ........ 335



CHAPTER XLIIL
TUB JOURNEY. . < 3 . . 388

CHAPTER XLIV.
THE JOURNEY. . 893

CHAPTER XLV.
A REMINISCENCE OP THE EAST ....... 396

CHAPTER XLVI.
A DAT IN THE PncENix . 401

CHAPTER XLVII.
AN ADVENTURE IN CANADA . 405

CHAPTER XLVIII.
THE COURIER'S PASSI-OKT 415

CHAPTER XLIX.
A NIGHT IN STRASBOURG) , 421

CHAPTER L.
A SURPRISE 429

CHAPTER LI.
JACK WALLER'S STORY . 43 S

CHAPTER LII.
MUNIOH 451

CHAPTER LIII.
Isu AI MUNICH -15J



XX CONTENTS.



CHAPTER LIV.

TAG*

THE BAH . . 459



CHAPTER LV.
A DISCOVERT ........ , . . 4f>

CHAPTER LVI.
CONCLUSIO* , .... , 477



HARRY LORREQUER.



CHAPTER I.

ABIUVAL IN CORK CIVIC FESTIVITIES PRIVATE THEATRICALS.

IT was on a splendid morning in the autumn of the year
181 that the Howard transport, with 400 of his Majesty's
4 th Regiment, dropped anchor in the picturesque harbour
of Cove ; the sea shone tinder the purple light of the rising
sun with a rich rosy hue, beautifully in contrast with the
different tints of the foliage of the deep woods already tinged
with the brown of autumn. Spike Island lay "sleeping upon
its broad shadow," and the large ensign which crowns the
battery was wrapped around the flagstaff, there not being
even air enough to stir it. It was still so early that but few
persons were abroad ; and as we leaned over the bulwarks,
and looked now, for the first time for eight long years, upon
British ground, many an eye filled, and many a heaving breast
told how full of recollection-s that short moment was, and
how different our feelings from the gay buoyancy with which
we had sailed from that same harbour for the Peninsula; many
of our best and bravest had we left behind us, and more than
one native to the land we were approaching had found his
last rest in the soil of the stranger. It was, then, with a
mingled sense of pain and pleasure we gazed upon that peace-
ful little village, whose white cottages lay dotted along the
edge of the harbour. The moody silence our thoughts had
ehed over us was soon broken : the preparations for disem-
barking had begun, and I recollect well to this hour how,

B



2 HARRY LORREQUER.

shaking off the load that oppressed my heart, I descended
the gangway, humming poor Wolfe's well-known song :

" Why, soldiers, why
Should we be melancholy, boys ? "

And to this elasticity of spirits -whether the result of my
profession or the gift of God as Dogberry has it I know
not I owe the greater portion of the happiness I have en-
joyed in a life, whose changes and vicissitudes have equalled
most men's.

Drawn up in a line along the shore, I could scarce refrain
from a smile at our appearance. Four weeks on board a
transport will certainly not contribute much to the per-
sonnel of any unfortunate therein confined ; but when, in
addition to this, you take into account that we had not re-
ceived new clothes for three years if I except caps for our
grenadiers, originally intended for a Scotch regiment, but
found to be all too small for the long-headed generation.
Many a patch of brown and grey variegated the faded scarlet
of our uniform, and scarcely a pair of knees in the entire
regiment did not confess their obligations to a blanket. But
with all this, we showed a stout, weather-beaten front, that,
disposed as the passer-by might feel to laugh at our expense,
very little caution would teach him it were fully as safe to
indulge it in his sleeve.

The bells from every steeple and tower rang gaily out a
peal of welcome as we marched into " that beautiful city
called Cork," our band playing " Garryowen " for we had.
been originally raised in Ireland, and still among our officers
maintained a strong majority for that land of punch, priests,
and potatoes the tattered flag of the regiment proudly waving
over our heads, and not a man amongst us whose warm heart
did not bound behind a Waterloo medal. Well, well ! I am
now alas ! that I should say it somewhat in the " sere and
yellow ; " and I confess, after the experience of some moments
of high, triumphant feeling, that I never before felt within
me the same animating, spirit-filling glow of delight as rose
within my heart that day as I marched at the head of my
company down George's-street.

We were soon settled in barracks ; and then began a series
of entertainments on the side of the civic dignities of Cork,
which led most of us to believe that we had only escaped shot



ARRIVAL IN CORK. 8

nnd shell to fall less gloriously beneath champagne and claret.
I do not believe there is a coroner in the island who would
have pronounced but the one verdict over the regiment
" Killed by the mayor and corporation," had we so fallen.

First of all, we were dined by the citizens of Cork and,
to do them justice, a harder drinking set of gentlemen no
city need boast ; then we were feasted by the corporation ;
then by the sheriffs ; then came the mayor, solus ; then an
address, with a cold collation, that left eight of us on the
sick-list for a fortnight : but the climax of all was a grand
entertainment given in the Mansion House, and to which up-
wards of two thousand were invited. It was a species of
fancy ball, beginning by a deje&ner at three o'clock in the
afternoon, and ending I never yet met the man who could
tell when it ended ! As for myself, my finale partook a little
of the adventurous, and I may as well relate it.

After waltzing for about an hour with one of the prettiest
girls J ever set eyes upon, and getting a tender squeeze of
the hand, as I restored her to a most affable-looking old lady
in a blue turban and a red velvet gown, who smiled benignly
at me, and called me " Meejor" I retired, to recruit for a new
attack, to a small table, where three of ours were quaffing
ftonclie a la Ifomaine, with a crowd of Corkfigians about
them, eagerly inquiring after some heroes of their own city,
whose deeds of arms they were surprised did not obtain
special mention from "the Duke." I soon ingratiated my-
self into this well-occupied clique, and dosed them with glory
to their hearts' content. I resolved at once to enter into
their humour; and as the "ponche " mounted up to my brain
I gradually found my acquaintanceship extend to every family
and connection in the country.

" Did ye know Phil Beamish of the 3 th, sir ? " said a
tall, red-faced, red- whiskered, well-looking gentleman, who
bore no slight resemblance to Feargus O'Connor.

" Phil Beamish ! " said I. " Indeed I did, sir, and do still ;
and there is not a man in the British army I am prouder of
knowing." Here, by the way, I may mention that I never
heard the name till that moment.

"You don't say so, sir ?" said Feargus for so I must call
him, for shortness' sake. " Has he any chance of the com-
pany yet, sir? "

*' Company 1 " said I, in astonishment. " He obtained his

B 2



4 HARRY LORREQUE2.

majority three months since. You cannot possibly liave
heard from him lately, or you would have known that ? "

" That's true, sir. I never heard since he quitted the 3 th
to go to Versailles, I think they call it, for his health. But
how did he get the step, sir ? "

" Why, as to the company, that was remarkable enough ! "



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