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UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA
AT LOS ANGELES





THE GIFT OF

MAY TREAT MORRISON

IN MEMORY OF

ALEXANDER F MORRISON







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THE



DODD FAMILY



ABROAD



BY

CHARLES LEVER

AUTHOR OF "CHARLES o'iMALLEY "



WITH ILLUSTRATIONS



VOL. II.



LONDON
GEORGE ROUTLEDGE AND SONS

The Broadway, Ludgate
NEW YORK: 416. BROOME STREET



LONDOX :

WOODPALL AND KINKKn, PRIKTERS,

UiLFORD LAKE, STRAND, W.C.



• ♦.•• •_•••• • •

.•••••• .• ••

• ••*..• •

'. ,'

• ••» • •••«»•

.••. .«. • •

_• •• ••• ••••






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CONTENTS.



LETTER I.

PAGE

Kenny James Dodd to Mr. Pprcell, of the Grakqe, Bruff 1



LETTER n.

Kenny James Dodd to Thomas Purcell, Esq., of the Grange,

Bruff 15

LETTER IIL
Mary Anne Dodd to Miss Doolan, of Ballydoolan . , 22

LETTER IV.
Krs. Dodd to Mrs. Mary Gallagher, Dodsborough , . 27

LETTER V.

Kenny James Dodd to Thomas Pdrcell, Esq., op the Grange,

Bruff . 44



LETTER VL

Kenny James Dodd to Thomas P0rcell, Esq., of the Grange,

Bruff 5



LETTER VIL
Betty Cobb to JfRS. Shusan O'Shea, Priest's House, Bruff . 58



IV C0NTKNT8.



LETTER VIII.

PAOf
KeXSV I. DoPD TO TllOMVS PURCELI, EiQ., OF THE GrASCE,

I'lUFP 64



LETTER IX.
M.vuv Anne Dodd to Miss Doolan, op Ijallyijuolas , . £3

LETTER X.
Mart Anne Dodd to Miss Doolan, op IJallydoolax . . 'Ji

LETTER XI.

Kksst James Dodd to Thomas Pcrcell, Esq., o? the (Jkance,

Drcft 1C5

LETTER XII.
James Dodd to Robert Doolan-, Esq., Trinitt Colleue, Diblin IH

LETTER XIII.

Caroline DoI'D to Miss (Jox, at Miss Mincinu's Aaademt,

Black Rock, InKLA>D 118

LETTER XIV.
Mrs. Dodd to Mrs. Mart Qallaouek, Dor&DORouGii . .127

LETTER XV.

Kenny James Dodd to Thomas Pcrcell, Esq., op the Grange,

]}rufp 132

LETTER XVL
Mary Anse Dodd to Miss Doolan, of Balltdoolajj . .153



CONTENTS.



LETTER XVII.

TAG K

JIks. Dodd to 'Mrs. ^Mauy Gallagher, Priest's House, Beufp It) 2



LETTER XYIII.

James Dodd to Lord G::orge Tiverto.v, M.P., Poste Restaxie,

Pjregenz 170



LETTER XIX.

Miss JIakt Anne Dodd to Thomas Purcell, Esq., of tue

Grange, Bruff 181



LETTER XX.
lilRS. Dodd to Mrs. Mart Gallagher, Dodsborcitgh . .184

LETTER XXI.
Miss Mart Anne Dodd to Miss Doolan, of Ballydoolan . 1S7

LETTER XXII.
KicNNY Dudd to Thomas Purcell, Esq., of the Grange, Bruff 193

LETTER XXIII.

Ken.ny James Dodd to Thomas Purcell, Esq., op the Grakqe,

Bruff 207

LETTER XXIV.
James Dvidd to Lord Geokgi: Tiverton, M.P, . , . • 226

LETTER XXV.
Mrs. Dodd to Mrs. Mary Gallagher, DoDSBOROuan . » 22'



VI CONTENTS.



LETTER XXVI.

PAOK

Miss Maut Axxe Dodd to Miss Doolak, of Balltdciolan . 240



LETTER XXVH.

Kkknt James Dodd to Tuomas PuRcnLt, Esq., ok the (Juam-i:,

BuuFF 245



LETTER XXVIII.
Mart Anne Dodd to Miss Doolan, of Ba^lvdoolan . . 253

LETTER XXrX.
Mrs. Dodd to Mrs. Mary Gallaoiier, Dodsboeouoh . . '2C2

LETTER XXX.
Eettt Cobb to Mistrt^ss Shusan O'Shea 266

LETTER XXXI.
James Dodd to Robert Doolan, Esq., Trinity College, Dublin 2C9

LETTER XXXn.
Mr.s. Dodd to Mrs. Mary Gallagher 273

LETTER XXXIIL

Miss Caroline Dodd to Miss Cox, at Miss Miscinq's Acade:it,

IjLack Rock, Ireland 233

LETTER XXXIV.
Mary Anne Dodd to Miss Doolan, of Balltdoolan . . 291



CONTENTS, Vll



LETTER XXXV.

PAGE

James Dodd to Robert Doolan, Esq., Trinity College, Dublin "298



LETTER XXXYI.
Kennt Dodd to Thomas Purcell, Esq., Grange, Bruff . . 304

LETTER XXXVII.
Mrs. Dodd to Mrs. Gallagher, Dodsborough . . . . 321

LETTER XXXVIIL
James Dodd to Robert Doolan, Esq., Trinity College, Dublin 326

LETTER XXXIX.
]\lARr Anne Dodd to Miss Doolan, op Balltdoolan . . 339

LETTER XL.

Kenny James Dodd to Thomas Purcell, Esq., of the Grange,

Bruff 348

LETTER XLL

Miss Caroline Dodd to Miss Cox, at J.Iiss Mincing's Academy,

Black Rock, Ireland 361

LETTER XLIL

Kenny James Dodd to Thomas Purcell, Esq., of the Grange,

Bruff 3G7



m



THE



DODD FAMILY ABROAD,



LETTER I.

KEXNT JAMES DODD TO 5IR. PURCELl, OF THE GRANGE, BRUFP.

My deaf;. Tom, — I am not in a humour for letter-writing",
nor, indeed, for anything else that I know of. I am sick,
sore, and sorry — sick of the world, sore in my feet, and
sorry of heart that I ever consented to come out upon this
toui'ing expedition, every step and mile of which is marked
by its own misery and misfortune. I got back — I won't
say home, for it would be an abuse of the word — ou
Wednesday last. I travelled all the way on foot, with
something less than one-and-fourpence English for my
daily expenses, and arrived to find my wife entertaining,
at a pic-nic, all Baden and its vicinity, with pheasants
and champagne enough to feast the London Corporation,
and an amount of cost and outlay that would have made
Dodsborough brilliant during a whole Assizes.

I broke up the meeting, perhaps less ceremoniously than
a Cabinet Council is dissolved at Osborne House, where
the Ministers, after luncheon, embark — as the Court Jour-
oial tells — on board the Fairy, to meet the express train
for London : valuable facts, that we never weary of
reading ! I routed them without even reading the Riot
Act, and saw myself " master of the situation ; " and a
very pretty situation it was.

Now, Tom, when the best of two evils at a man's
choice is to expose his family as vulgar pretenders and

VOL. II. B



2 inE DODD FAMILY ABnOAD.

adventurers— to show ihem up to the fiiio world of their
fashionabU' j^cqujiiuiunces as a hamhug and a sham — let
me tell you tli:it the other side of" the medal cannot have
been very attructive. Tiiis was precisely the case here.
♦' It is not pleasant," said I to myself, " to bring all the
scandrd and slander of professional bad tongues upon an
unfortunate family, but ruin is worse still ! " There was
the whole sum and substance of my calculation — " Ruin
is worse still ! " The pic-nic cost above a hundied pounds
■ — the hotel expenses at Baden amounted to three hundred
more — there are bills to bo paid at nearly every shop in
the town — and here we are, economizing as usual, at a
large hotel, at, to say the least, the rate of some five or
six pounds per day. That I am able to sit down and
•write these items, in a clear and legible hand, I take to
be as fine an example of courage as ever was given to the
world. Talk of men in a fire — an eartliquake — a ship-
wreck — or even the " last collision on the Suuth-Eastem"
— I give the palm to the man who can be calm in the
midst of duns, and be collected when his debts cannot be.
To be credited when you can no longer pay — to drink
champagne when you haven't small change for small
beer, is enough to shake the boldest nerves ; it is exactly
like dancing on a tight rope, from which you know in
your heart you must ultimately come down with a crash.

When one reads of any sudden calamity having befallen
a man who has incurred voluntary peril, the natural
question at once rises, " What did he want to do ? What
was he trying for ?" Now, suppose this question to be
addressed to the Dodd family, and that any one should
ask, " What did we want to do?" I am sadly afraid,
Tom, that we should be puzzled for the answer. I have
no doubt that my wife would sustain a long and harass-
ing cross-examination before the truth would come out.
I am well aware of all the specious illusions she would
evoke, and what sagacious notions she would scatter about
education, accomplishments, modern lauguages, and maybe
— mother like — great matches for the girls, but the truth
would out, at last — we came abroad to be something —
"whatever it might be — that we couldn't be at home; we
changed our theatre, that we might take a new line of






DOING IT, TO SAY YOU DID IT. 3

parts. We wanted, in sliort, to bo in a world that we

never were in before, and we have had our wish. I am

not going to rail at fashionable life and high society. I

am sure that, to those brought up in their ways, they ai*e

both pleasant and agreeable ; but they never were our

ways, and we were too old when we began to learn them.

The grand world, to people like us, is like going up Mont

Blanc — fatigue, peril, expense, injury to health, and ruin

to pocket, just to have the barren satisfaction of saying,

" I was up there last August — I was at the top in June. "

" What did you get for your pains, Kenny Dodd ? What

did you see for all the trouble you had ? Are you wiser ? "

•' No." " Arc you happier ? " " No." " Are you better

informed ? " " No." " Are you pleasanter company for

your old friends ? " " No." " Are you richer? " " Upon

my conscience, I am not! All I know is, that we were

there, and that we came down again." Ay, Tom, there's

the moral of the whole story — we came down again !

Had we limited our ambition, when we came abroad, to

things reasonably attainable — had we been satisfied to

know and to associate with people like ourselves — had we

sought out the advantages which certainly the Continent

possesses in certain matters of taste and accomplishment,

we might have got something at least for our money, and

not paid too dearly for it. But, no; the great object with

as seemed always to be, swimming for our lives in the

great ocean of fashion. And, let me tell you a secret,

Tom ; this gi'ovelling desire to be amongst a set that wo

have no pretension to, is essentially and entirely English.

No foreigner, so far as I have seen, has the vulgar vice of

what is called " tuft-hunting." When I see my countiy-

men abroad, I am forcibly reminded of what I once v/it-

nessed at a show of wild beasts. It was a big cage full of

monkeys, that were eating their dinner at a long trough,

but none of them would taste what was before himself, bat

was always eating out of his neighbour's dish. It gave

them the oddest look in the world ; but it is exactly wliat

you see on the Continent; and I'll tell you what fosters this

taste more strongly than all. Our titled classes at home

are a close borough, that men like you and myself never

trespass upon. We see a lord as we see a pi-ize bull at a

B 2



4 TRK DODD FAHIILY ABROAD.

cattle sliONV, once nnd away in our lives; but here, the
aristocracy is plentiful — barons, counts, and even princes,
abound, and can be obtained at the " shortest notice, and
sent to any part of the town." Tliink of the fascination
of this; fancy the delight of a family like the Dodds,
surrounded with dukes and marquises!

One of the very first things that strikes a man on
coming abroad is the abundance of that kind of fruit
that we only see at home in our hot-houses. Every
ragged urchin is munching a peach or a melon, and pick-
ing the big grapes off a bunch that he speedily flings
away. The astonishment of the Englishman is great, and
he naturally thinks it all Paradise. But wait a bit. He
soon discovers that the melon has no more flavour than a
mangel-wurzel, and that the apricot tastes like a turnip
radish. If they are plenty, they are totally deficient in
every excellence of their kind: and it is just the same
with the aristocracy. The climate is favourable to them,
and the same sun and soil rears princes and ripens pine-
apples ; but they're not like our own, Tom ; not a bit of
it. Like the fruit, they are poor, sapless, tasteless pro-
ductions, and the very utmost they do for you is to give
you a downright indill'erence to the real article. I know
how it reads in the newspapers, in a letter dated from
some far-away land, on a Christmas-day — " As I write,
raj Avindow is open ; the garden is one sea of blossoms,
and the perfume of the rose and the jasmine fills the
room." Just the same is the ed'cct of those wonderful
paragraphs of distinguished and illustrious guests at Mrs.
Somebody's soiree. They are the common products of
the soil, and they do not rise to the rank of luxuries with
even the poor ! Don't mistake me ; I am not depreciating
■what is called high society, no more than I would con-
demn a particular climate. All that I would infer is,
simply, that it does not suit wy constitution. It's a very
common remark, how much more easily women conform
to the habits and customs of a class above their own than
men, and, so far as 1 have seen, the observation is a just
one ; bat, let me tell you, Tom, the price they pay lor
this same plastic quality is more than the value of the
article, for they lose all self-guidance and judgment by



(



POLITICAL TITTLE-TATTLE. 5

tlie cliangc. Toul' quietly-disposed, domestic ones turn
out gadders, your thrifty housekeepers grow lavish and
wasteful, your safe and cautious talkers become evil
speakers and slanderers. It is not that these are the
characteristics of the new sect they have adopted, but that,
like all converts, they always begin their imitation with
the vices of the faith they conform to, and by way of
laying a good foundation, they start from the bottom !

If I say these things in bitterness, it is because I feel
them in sincerity. Poor old Giles Langrishe used to say
that all the expenses of contested elections, all the bribery
and treating, all the cost of a Parliamentai'y life, would
never have embarrassed him, if it wasn't for his wife
going to London. " It wasn't only what she spent,''
said he, " while there ; but Molly brought Piccadilly back
with her to the county Clare ! She turned up her nose
at all our old neighbours, because they didn't know the
Prussian ambassador, or Chevalier Somebody from the
Brazils. The only man that could fit her in shoes lived
in Bond Street ; and as to getting her hair dressed, except
by a French scoundrel that made wigs for the aristocracy,
it was clearly impossible." And I'll tell you another
thing, Tom, our wives get a kind of smattering of poli-
tical knowledge by this trip to town, that makes them
unbearable. They hear no other talk all the morning
than the cant of the House and the slang of the Lobby.
It's a dodge of Sir James, or a sly trick of Lord John,
that forms the gossip at breakfast; and all the little
rogueries of political life, all the tactics of party, are dis-
cussed before them, and when thej^ take to that line of
talk hey become perfectly odious.

Haven't they their own topics ? Isn't dancing, dress,
the drama, enough for them, I ask? — without even speak-
ing of divorce cases — that they won't leave bills, motions,
and debates to their husbands ? Whenever I see Mrs.
Honey, of Bally Honey, or Mrs. Miles MacDermot, of
Castle Brack, in the Morning Post, among the illusti'ious
company at Lady Wheedleham's party, I say to myself,
" 1 wish your neighbours joy of you when you go home
again, that's all ! "

And yet all this would have been better for me than



6 THE DODD FAMIL"? AUIlOAD.

tliis comlnt? abroad ! I mifjht have bceu member for
IJrufl' fur Ijalf tlic cost of tliis unlucky expedition! And
this was economy, forsooth ! Do you know how much
wo spent, liard cash, since !March last? I am fairly
ashamed to tell you, Tom ; and though money lies mijjflity
close to my heart, I don't rer;;ret the loss as much as I do
that of many a good trait that we brought away with us,
and have contrived to lose on the road. All this running
about the world, this eternfil change of place and people,
imparts such an " Old Soldicrism," if I may make the
word, to a family, that they lose all that quiet charm of
domesticity that forms the fascination of a home.

Fathers and mothers ai'c worldly, as a matter of course.
It comes upon them just like chronic rheumatism, or
baldness, or any other infirmity of time and years, but
it's hateful to see young people calculating and speculat-
ing ; planning for this, and plotting for that. You ask,
perhaps, " What has this to do with foreign travel ? " and
I say — " Everything." Your young lady that has polka'd
at Paris, galloped up the llhine, waltzed at Vienna, and
bolero'd at Madrid, has about as much resemblance to an
English or Irish girl, brought up at home, as the show-off
horse of a circus has to a thorough-bred hunter. It's all
training and teaching — very graceful, perhaps, and pretty
to look at — but only fit for display, and worth nothing
without lamps, sawdust, and spectators. Now, these
things are not native to us, partly from climate, partly
from old habit, prejudice, and natural inclination. We
like to have a home. Our fireside has a kind of religious
estimation in our eyes, associated as it is with that family
grouping that includes everything from two years and a
half to eighty — from the pleasant prattle of infancy to
the harmless murmurings of grandpapa. The foreigner
— I don't care of what nation, they are all alike — has no
idea of this. His own house to him is only one remove
above a prison. He has little light, and less fire ; neither
comfort nor companionship! For him, life means society,
plenty of well-dressed people, handsome salons, wax-
lights, movement, bustle, and confusion, the din of fivo
hundred tongues, that only wag for scandal, and the
Bparkle of eyes, that are only brilliant for wickedness.



AN ARMED TRUCE. 7

These foreigners are reallj wonderful people, so frivo-
lous about all that is grave or serious, so sober-minded in
every folly and absurdity, we never rightly understand
them, and that is one reason why all our imitation of
tbera is so ludicrous.

Have you ever seen a fellow in a circus, Tom, wliose
feat was to jump from a horse's back through some half-
dozen hoops a little bigger than his body ? He has kept
this performance for his finish, for it is his chef d'oeuvre,
and he wants to " sink in full glory resplendent." Some-
how or other, though, he can't summon up pluck for the
eflPort. Now the horse goes wrong leg — now it's the
fault of the fellows that hold the hoops — now the pace is
not fast enough ; in fact nothing goes right with him,
and there he spins round and round, wishing with all his
heart it was done and over. I'm pretty much in the
same plight this moment, Tom, at least as regards hesita-
tion and indecision ; for while I have been rambling on
about foreign life and manners, my mind was full of a
very ditferent theme ; but from downright shame have I
kept off" it, for I'm tired of recording all our miseries and
misfortunes. Here goes, however, for the spring — I can't
defer it any longer.

Since I came back, I haven't exchanged ten words
with Mrs. D. It is an armed truce between us, and each
stands ready, and only waiting for the attack. If, how-
ever, I consign to oblivion all remembrance of her extra-
vagance, the chance is that she is to keep blind to my
infidelity ! In a word, the pic-nic and Mrs. G. are to be
buried together. Of course the terms of our convention
prevented my learning much of the family doings in my
absence. Even had I moved for any papers or corre-
spondence on the subject, I should have been met by a Hat
refusal ; and, in fact, I was left, the way poor Curran
used to say of himself, to pick up my facts from the
opposite counsel's statement. I was not long destined to
the bliss of ignorance. Such a hurricane of bills and
accounts I never withstood before. James, however, by
what arts of flattery I know not, succeeded in getting
hold of his mother's bank book, and went out, a few
evenings ago, and paid everything ; and, that we might



8 THE DODD FAMILY ABROAD.

escape at once from this den of iniquity, went immedi-
ately to the Prefecture for our passport. The commissary
ivas at his cafe, whither James followed him, and, some-
how or other, an angry discussion got up between them,
and they separated, aftar exchanging something that was
not the compliments of the season.

I'm BO used to rows and shindies, that I went fust
asleep while he was telling me of it ; but the following
morning I was to have a jog to my memory that I didn't
expect — no less than two gendarmes, with their earbifes
on their arms, having arrived to escort me to the "Bureau
of the Police." I dressed accordingly, and set out alone ;
for although James nii^dit have been useful in many
■ways, I was too much afraid of his rashness and hot
temper, to take him. We arrived before the door was
open, and spent twenty minutes in the street, surrounded
by a mixed assemblage, who commented upon me, and
my supposed crime, with great freedom and impartiality.

After another long wait in a dirty ante-room, I was
Tishered into a large chamber, where the great functionary
was seated at a table covered with papers, and at a
smaller one, close by, sat what I perceived to be his clerk,
or private secretary. Of course I imagined it was for
Boraething that James had said the previous evening that
I was thus arraigned, and tliough I thouglit it was like
reading ihe passage in the Decalogue backwards, to make
the father sutler for the children, I resolved to be patient
and submissive throucjliout.

"Your name?" said the commissary, bluntly, but
never offering me a seat, nor even noticing my " Goud
morning."

" Dodd," said I, as shortly.

"Christian name?"

" Kenny James."

"Where born?"

*' At Brufi; in Ireland."

*' How old?"

"Upwards of fifty — not certain for a year, more or
less."

" Eeligion ? "

•' Catholic."



BEFORE THE COMMISSARY OF POLICE. 9

'' Married or single ? "

" Married."

" AVith children — how many ? "

" Three— a boy and two girls."

" Do you follow any trade or profession ? "

"No."

*' Living upon private means ? "

"Yes."

These, and a vast number of similar queries — they
filled five sheets of long post — followed, touching where
we came from, how we had travelled, our object in the
journey, aud twenty things of the like kind, till I began
to feel that the examination in itself was not a small
penalty for a light transgression. At last, after a close
scrutiny into all ray family matters, my money resources,
and my habits, he entered upon another chapter, which I
own I thought was pushing the matter rather far, by say-
ing : " Apparently, Herr Dodd, you are one of those who
think that the monarchies of Europe are obsolete systems
of government, ill suited to the spirit and requirements
of the age. Is it not so ? "

If I had only a moment's time for reflection, I should
have said, "What is it to you how I think on these
subjects ? I don't belong to your country, and will
render no account of my private sentiments to you ; "
but unfortunately a discussion on politics is always
" nuts " to me — I can't resist it— and in I went, with
that kind of specious generality, that lays down a broad
and wide foundation for any edifice you like afterwards
to I'ear.

" Kings," said I, " are pretty much like other men —
good, bad, or indilferent, and, like other men, they are
not bettered by being left to the sway of their own
unbridled passions and tempers. Wherever, therefore,
there is no constitution to bind them, the chances are,
that they make ducks and drakes of their subjects."

I must tell you, Tom, that we conducted our interview
in English, which the commissary spoke fluently.

" The divine right of kings, then, you utterly over-
look ? "

"I deny it— I laugh it to _scorn," said I. '"Look at



10 THE DOPD FAMILY ABROAD.

the fellows wc see on tlirones — one is a creature fit for
Bedlam ; another ought to be in Norfolk Island. If they
possessed any of iliis divine riglit you talk of, should wo
have Seen them scuttling away as they did the otiier day,
because there was a row in their capitals ? "

" That will do — quite enough," said he, stopping 7no
short. " Your sentiments are sufEciently clear and ex-
plicit. You are a worthy disciple of ytjur friend Gauss."

"I never heard of him till now," said I.

"Nor of Isaac Henkenstrom? — nor Keichard Blitzler?
— nor Johann von Darg ? "

"Not one of them."

" This you swear?"

" This I swear," said I, firmly ; but the words were not
■^ell out, when the door was opened at a signal made by
the Commissary, and an old man, with a very white
beard, and in shabby black, was led forward.

" Do you know the Herr Professor now ? " asked the
Commissary of me.

" No," said I, stoutly — " never saw him before."

" Bring in the others," said he ; and, to my astonish-
ment, came forward three of the young fellows I had
travelled with on foot from Saxony, but whose names I
had not heard, or, if I heard, had forgotten.

" Are these men known to you ? " asked the Prefect,



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