Charles Jeremy Hoadly.

The New-York hand book, and merchants' guide. Being a reliable directory, for visiting merchants, to the prominent objects of interest in New-York online

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PRESENTED By
HENRY LEVY

49 MAIDEN LANE,

NEW -YORK.
1859.



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49 M A. I D E N" JL-A-ISTE,

IMPORTER OF AND DEALER IN

STATIONERY,

PINE TOILET .A. E. T I C LE S ,
Combs and Brushes f

EMBRACING

A. Full .Assortment of Articles

IN THI3 LINE,

Adapted to the Wants of a First-Class Trade.









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STREET V



THE



NEW-YORK HAND BOOK,



AND



MERCHANTS' GUIDE.

BEING A RELIABLE DIRECTORY, FOR VISITING MERCHANTS,

TO THE PROMINENT OBJECTS OF INTEREST

IN NEW-YORK.

WRITTEN, ARRANGED AND COMPILED

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Sxom &uil)entic Sources.

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PRESENTED BY

HENRY LEVY

49 MAIDEN LANE,
NEW-YORK.

18.59.



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IMPORTED BY

HENRY LEVY,



-4iir^^>-. byterian Education Society, 23 Centre.

Presbvterian Foreign Mission Society, 23
Centre.

Presbyterian Publication Soc, 23 Centre.

Prison Association of New-York, 15 Centre.

Protestant Episcopal Bomestic Mission
Society, Bible House, Astor Place.

Protestant Episcopal Foreign Mission So-
ciety. Bible House, Astor Place.

Protestant Episcopal Sunday-School and
Church Book Society, 637 Broadway.

Protestant Episcopal Tract Society, 55
East Thirteenth street.

Protestant Half Orphan Asylum, 142 Sixth
avenue.

Public School Society, Grand c. Elm.

Roman Catholic Half Orphan Asylum, Mott
c. Prince.

Rotunda, near the northeast corner of the
Park. (See p. 16.)

Rutgers Female Institute, 244 Madison.

Sailors' Home. 190 Cherry.

Sailors' Snug Harbor. Office. 115 Wall.

Seventh Bay Baptist Mission Society, 9
Spruce.

Stuyvesant Institute. 059 Broadway.

Surrogate's Office, N. Y. Times Building.

Tract Soc. of Methodist Episcopal Church,
200 Mulberry.

Trinity Church, Broadway. (See p. 13.)

Union Theological Seminary, 9 University
Place. (See p. 20.)




■""' i^'



NEW-YORK HAND-BOOK.



Mr. Smith, a resident historian, writing about the middle of the last century, gives
the following account of the city and of its inhabitants : — " The city of New-York
consists of about two thousand five hundred buildings. It is a mile in length, and not
above half that in breadth. Such is its figure, its centre of business, and the situation
of the houses, that the mean cartage from one part to another does not exceed a quarter
of a mile. It is thought to be as healthy a spot as any in the world."

A writer of recent date thus briefly, but forcibly, refers to this metropolis — the great
point of centralization for the enterprise of the entire continent. It is " the centre from
which radiates most of what constitutes the prosperity and glory of the country, and
to which it is directed, as the threads which comprise the spider's web all tend to the
nucleus in its middle. The commerce, the learning, the scientific knowledge concentra-
ted here — nay. the very geographical position of New-York, with its two water ap-
proaches opening into the ocean, covered with a net-work of steamships — the two mag-
nificent rivers which encircle it, the railroads which converge in its very heart, all tend
to make it the centre of civilization on the American continent."

It now occupies the entire island from the Battery to the Harlem river, about fourteen
miles in extent, or an area of nearly twenty-three square miles. In 1850 upward of
three thousand buildings were erected. During subsequent years the ratio has been much
greater, while the edifices exhibit the most lavish expenditure ; all tending to prove the
fact that New-York does business on a large scale. One of its latest and grandest enter-
prises is

THE GREAT CENTRAL PARK,

the lands of which came into the possession of the city in February, 1856.

Description of the Ground. — The tract comprises at present 773 acres, including
about 142 acres belonging to the Croton Aqueduct Department; and it contains, besides
streets and avenues, about 8,000 lots (25 x-100). Its cost was $5,444,369 90, of which
sum $1,657,590 was assessed on adjoining property, leaving $3,786,779 to be paid by the
city, the money being borrowed on five per cent, stock, payable in 1898. This is believed
to have been the largest sum ever expended in the purchase of land for a public park.

1*



10 NEW-YORK HAND-BOOK.

The park, as its name implies, lies in the geographical centre of New-York Island, heing
about five miles from the Battery and from King's Bridge, and about three quarters of a
mile from the East river and from the North river. It is about two and a half miles
long, and half a mile wide, being long and narrow in form, as compared with other parks
of equal size.

The narrow limits of this work utterly exclude the possibility of giving a detailed
description of this magnificent enterprise ; we, therefore, content ourselves by extract-
ing from the celebrated manual of Mr. Valentine, the following general view :

" The most important improvement now being made in the city, is the regulation of
the Central Park, which is situated very nearly in the geographical centre of the island,
and comprises 773 acres, bounded by Fifty-ninth street, Fifth Avenue, 106th street, and
Eighth avenue. It is proposed to extend it to 110th street, in order to secure the very
beautiful northern slope of a large hill, which lies mainly within the park. This ex-
tension will increase its size to about S40 acres. The receiving Croton reservoir, and
the new reservoir (now under construction) lie within the park, near its centre. The
Central Park is to be, in all respects, as-well adapted as is possible to the recreative
wants of the people of the city ; rich and poor, old and 3-oung, strong and weak, will
here find common ground ; and the arrangement of the various parts will be such as to
afford the largest facilities for individual enjoyment, without interference from, or inter-
fering with, those of different tastes. Pedestrians may roam at pleasure over twenty-
five miles of walks, some fashionable and much frequented, others retired and quiet ;
or over hundreds of acres of lawn, woodland and meadow. In their walks they may
obtain any desirable observation of equipages and equestrians without once having to
cross their track on the same level, or they may entirely seclude themselves, not only
from the sight, but from the sound of vehicles. Riders on horseback may join the
throng on the carriage-roads, or may confine their peregrinations to five miles of bridle
road, on which no vehicle will be admitted. Nearly two miles of this ride will be
about the new reservoir, where it is proposed to contrive for equestrians a level road
forty feet in width. For carriages there will be nearly eight miles of broad, well-made
roadway, affording, in its course, a view of nearly every object of interest in the Park,
but nowhere crossing on the same level, a foot path of importance, or any portion of
the bridle road. The main entrance to the Park will be at the corner of Fifth avenue
and Fifty-ninth street, and there will be minor entrances at Seventh avenue — at either
end of the Park — and at convenient points along Fifth and Eighth avenues. For the
accommodation of business travel across the Park, there will be provided four trans-
verse roads, so arranged as to pass under elevated portions of the roadways, and to
afford a direct thoroughfare across the Park, without obstructing or being obstructed
by pleasure travel. The prominent feature of the Park will be a grand mall, one quar-
ter of a mile in length, and two hundred feet in width, having a broad walk in ita



NEW- YORK HAND-BOOK. 11

41

centre, and four rows of elm trees extending through its entire length. This mall will
be approached at its southern end by a vestibule or lawn, ornamented with statuary, and
it will terminate at its northern extremity in a richly decorated water terrace and foun-
tain. At the foot of the terrace is the principal pond of the Park, containing nearly
twenty acres of water, and skirting the Ramble — a rural promenading district south of the
receiving reservoir. It was this pond which was filled for the benefit of skaters during
the past winter."

Further and general information respecting the general features of the Park may
be obtained, from an admirable pamphlet published by Messrs. A. 0. Moore & Co., and
entitled a " Guide to the Central Park," from which we extract the following



HOW TO SEE THE PARK — CITY OARS.

The Park may be reached by the Third, Sixth, and Eighth avenue railroads. The
■Third avenue cars run from the Astor House, via the Bowery and Third avenue, to
Ninety-second street. It is intended to continue this line to Harlem — One Hundred and
Thirtieth street — by the middle of July ; at present the continuation from Ninety-
second street to Harlem is by stages. This line runs parallel to the park, two blocks
distant, for its entire length, and affords the best accommodations for visiting those
parts which are now most interesting. Passengers may leave the cars at the depot
(Sixty -fifth street) , and walk across Hamilton square and a partially open street, to the
Fifth avenue, entering the park at the Arsenal gate or at Sixty-seventh street, the route
across being tolerable in dry weather ; at Seventy-first street, which is open to a very
favorable point of entrance ; at Seventy-ninth street, on the upper side of which there
is a good side-walk, to the Superintendents' offices ; at Eighty-sixth street, which is
flagged to the park, crossing it between the reservoirs ; or at One Hundred and Ninth
street, which is open to the park near its northern boundary. These cars run every two
and a half minutes, each alternate car (marked over the front, " Yorkville direct,")
running through to Ninety-second street, and the others only to Sixty-fifth street. The
stages leave for Harlem every eight minutes. The fare to Sixty-fifth street is five cents;
to any point between there and Ninety-second street, six cents ; and to any point abovo
Ninety-second street, ten cents. The time from the Astor House to Sixty-fifth street ia
forty-eight minutes ; to Seventy-ninth street, fifty-four minutes ; and to Ninety-second
street, sixty minutes. From Canal street it is eleven minutes less than from the Astor
House, and from Fourteenth street, twenty-five minutes less.

The Sixth avenue cars run from the Astor House, and from Broadway and Canal street
via Yarick street, etc., and the Sixth avenue, to Fifty-ninth street, the lower boundary
of the park. After leaving the cars, turn to the left, and enter at the first or second



12 ^ NEW-YORK HAND-BOOK.

stile. The first leads to a high mass of rock, whence may be had a good view of that
part of the park ; and the second, by the easiest route to the drive.

The Eighth avenue cars start from the same points as the Sixth, and pass, via Hudson
street, etc., to the Eighth avenue, on which they run to Forty-ninth street, whence
passengers may walk, a half mile, to the park, or until they meet, at Fifty-first street
(which they may, or may not) , a small car, that runs to and from Fifty-ninth street.
From the terminus of this line, one may turn to the right, and enter at the Seventh
avenue gate, or continue up the Eighth avenue to the Sixty-second street gate. The
fare on both of these roads is five cents, for any distance, and the cars run at frequent
intervals.

We now proceed to point out some of the leading objects of interest in New-York,
taking occasion to refer the reader to many new and interesting details, to be found in
the following admirably arranged and beautifully illustrated Hand-Books, " New-York
in a Nutshell, or Visitor's Hand-Book to the City," by T. W. Strong ; Neilson & Son's
" City of New- York, and its Neighborhood ;" and Horn's "Great Metropolis," from which,
by permission, we make a few extracts.

THE BATTERY.

At the southern end of the city, fronting on the bay, may be seen the Battery.
It is in the form of a crescent, and has been laid out, at the public expense, in a manner
which has greatly added to its beauty and its general attraction as a pleasure-ground.
It is planted with trees and laid out with gravel walks ; it. is embanked and fenced in
front, and surrounded with an if on railing ; in the heat of summer it is tempered by the
cooling sea-breeze, and looks out on the splendid bay, with its manifold objects of life
and beauty : so that, altogether, it would be difficult to imagine a promenade more
beautiful or more salubrious. Connected with the Battery is Castle Garden. Originally
a fortification, it was subsequently let on lease as a place of public amusement. It is
probably the largest audience-room in the world, being capable of holding upward of


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