Charles McLean Andrews.

Guide to the manuscript materials for the history of the United States to 1783, in the British Museum, in minor London archives, and in the libraries of Oxford and Cambridge online

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Guide to the Manuscript Materials for the History
of the United States to 1783, in the British
Museum, in Minor London Archives, and in
the Libraries of Oxford and Cambridge



BY



CHARLES M. ANDREWS

Professor in the Johns Hopkins University



AND



FRANCES G. DAVENPORT

Of the Carnegie Institution of Washington




WASHINGTON, D. C

Published by the Carnegie Institution of Washington
1908



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
DAVIS, CALIFORNIA




Guide to the Manuscript Materials for the History
of the United States to 1783, in the British
Museum, in Minor London Archives, and in
the Libraries of Oxford and Cambridge



BY



CHARLES M. ANDREWS

Professor in the Johns Hopkins University



AND



FRANCES G. DAVENPORT

Of the Carnegie Institution of Washington




WASHINGTON, D. C.

Published by the Carnegie Institution of Washington
1908



LLM.Vfc.H- .. . .-OilNiA

LliuARY

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTU133
DAVIS



CARNEGIE INSTITUTION OF WASHINGTON

PUBLICATION No. 90




JSorfc $>afttmore (p

BALTIMORE, MD., TJ. S. A.



PREFACES

The present volume is part of a series, in which the Carnegie Institution of
Washington proposes to present inventories guiding the student of American
history to such manuscript materials as are to be found in the archives and
libraries of foreign countries. The previous issues in the same series have
been Mr. L. M. Perez's Guide to the Materials for American History in
Cuban Archives, and Professor W. R. Shepherd's Guide to the Materials for
the History of the United States in Spanish Archives (Simancas, the Archivo
Historico Nacional, and Seville), The next archives to be dealt with in simi
lar volumes are those of Paris, Mexico and Rome.

The project of a comprehensive and detailed Guide to the Manuscript
Materials for American History in London Repositories antedates the Carne
gie Institution of Washington. In the belief that such a manual would be a
boon to many workers in the history of the United States the writer of these
lines began in 1899 to plan for it and to attempt to bring it into existence.
The American Antiquarian Society was approached, with a view to persuade
it to use for the preparation of such a book the income of one of its funds.
At a meeting of the council of that society in October, 1900, an appropriation
was made, and the society's committee of publication was authorized to pro
ceed. The plan then in mind contemplated three forms of entry under each
subdivision of each archive e. g., of the Public Record Office. First, the
body of original papers composing that section should be described, with spe
cial reference to the question, what it contained for American history. Sec
ondly, there should be a list of transcripts, made from documents in that
section, which were to be found in American archives and libraries. Thirdly,
there should be a list of references to documents from that section which had
anywhere been put into print. This last portion was first provided for by
the society, and the data for the desired list were searched for and noted by
Miss Gertrude S. Kimball of Providence.

It had at first been planned that the portion of the volume which would
have to be made in London, corresponding to the first of the three sorts of
material noted above, might be prepared by a competent official of the Public
Record Office. This proving impracticable, endeavors were made, and suc
cessfully, to enlist for the project the services of Professor Charles M. An
drews, then of Bryn Mawr College, who had already spent much time in
London archives, and was preparing to spend the ensuing year in further in
vestigations in England on his own behalf.

A few months after this, however, the Advisory Committee on History
appointed by the Trustees of the Carnegie Institution urged, as one of the



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iv Prefaces.

chief recommendations of its preliminary report, that systematic searches of
European archives for materials for American history should hold a prom
inent position among the activities of the Institution in the field of history.
The suggestion was adopted, and in December, 1903, the decision was finally
reached that the work in England should be at once begun, under the aus
pices of the Carnegie Institution instead of the American Antiquarian
Society, which had found difficulties to stand in the way of what it had first
resolved on. That society generously presented to the Carnegie Institution
the mass of data which had been accumulated at its expense, relating to
documents from the British archives already printed.

Immediately Professor Andrews, who had already since August been at
work in the Bodleian Library, was informed by Professor McLaughlin, then
director of the historical work of the Carnegie Institution, of the decision of
the trustees, and was engaged to continue the work in the interest of the
Carnegie Institution. His instructions, at his request, confined him to mate
rials for the period preceding 1783, the period subsequent to the British
recognition of American independence having a distinct character, and in
London to the two chief public repositories the Public Record Office and
the British Museum and the Privy Council Office. The inclusion of the
Oxford and Cambridge libraries was also resolved upon.

Nearly all the period from November, 1903, to September, 1904, was spent
in careful searching of the repositories named, volume by volume, and in
many cases page by page. Never before, it is certain, had any search of them
so thorough and systematic been carried out in the interest of any one large
field of history. A preliminary report of the results was read at the meeting
of the American Historical Association at Chicago in December, 1904, and
printed in the American Historical Review for January, 1905 (vol. X., pp.
325-349). The summer months of 1905, and eventually of 1907 also, were
spent in the continuance of the same task, and the material on the Public
Record Office and British Museum was practically completed.

But it was concluded that the work would better answer the purposes for
which it was composed if it were extended to include, still within the same
chronological limitations, the minor public archives of London as well as the
great collections of the Public Record Office and the British Museum. As
it was impossible for Professor Andrews to go to England in the summer of
1906, Miss Frances G. Davenport of the Department of Historical Research
in the Carnegie Institution was requested to go thither, and to complete the
work by cataloguing the American materials in minor London archives, with
instructions intended to make her work harmonious in character with that
of Professor Andrews. It subsequently appeared that, through inadvertence,
these instructions diverged at one point in such a manner as to cause a dif
ference in the product, deserving to be noted at this point. Whereas Pro-



Prefaces. v

fessor Andrews had, for excellent reasons, systematically included papers
relating to Canada and the British West Indies, treating them with the same
degree of fulness as papers relating to any of the thirteen continental colo
nies, Miss Davenport's instructions were such that, in her portion of the
work, documents relating to Canada exclusively have not as a rule been in
cluded, while documents relating to the British West Indies, though included,
especially if of general interest to the history of the empire, have been treated
on a lesser scale.

The line of demarcation between the work of Professor Andrews and that
of Miss Davenport in the present volume is easily drawn, the former having
dealt with the manuscripts in the British Museum, Privy Council Office and
War Office Library, and at Oxford and Cambridge, and the latter with the
minor archives (though both, it chanced, examined the records of the Corpo
ration of the City of London) . With these minor archives Miss Davenport
was occupied from July, 1906, to February, 1907, Professor Andrews mean
while spending such time as he could command in the preparation of his
material for the press.

The plan contemplated two volumes, of which the first should be entirely
devoted to Professor Andrews's notes on the American materials in the Pub
lic Record Office. But when the volume was already in the printer's hands
and proof-sheets of the earlier pages had been received, in the summer of
1907, all work upon it was stopped by the arrival of news from Professor
Andrews, then in London, to the effect that the authorities of the Public
Record Office had begun to make a new classification of some of the collec
tions bulking largest in such a volume, especially the Colonial Office Papers.
The changes of arrangement were to be so thoroughgoing as to make a re
casting of much of the volume necessary, and the process would last so long
as to postpone for more than a year, perhaps for two years, the possibility
of progress in the remaking of the book. It appeared that there was no
course but to go forward with the other volume as an independent publica
tion, and to place it at the service of scholars without waiting for the com
pletion of the volume on the Public Record Office, which would naturally
have preceded.

The order of arrangement in the present volume is based upon the fol
lowing classification: the British Museum, a quasi-governmental establish
ment; archives of the national government; archives of the local govern
ment; archives of religious bodies or of libraries primarily theological, con
taining material for the history, in the colonies, of the Church of England,
the Roman Catholic Church, the Presbyterian and Congregational churches,
and the Friends; the archives of the leading British scientific society of the
period ; and of a great trading company ; finally, the libraries of Oxford and
Cambridge.



vi Prefaces.

Although it is believed that the most important bodies of material relating
to the history of the plantations and preserved in the minor London archives
are noticed in the following pages, yet it is certain that some additional
material is to be found in archives not therein described. Thus, in the
archives of the church of the Moravian Brethren, 32 Fetter Lane, which it
was not practicable to inspect, are some diaries and letters bearing on the
early history of that sect in this country. So far as ascertained, however,
these papers are neither numerous nor of much general interest. The
churchwardens' accounts of city parishes contain entries of payments for
various charitable uses connected with the colonies, such as the sending of
poor children to Virginia, etc. Several references to such items are given
by Mr. W. A. Bewes in his work on Church Briefs, or Royal Warrants for
Collections for Charitable Objects (1896). The records of Bridewell also
contain some matter pertaining to the transportation of vagrants to this
country, as has been pointed out by Miss E. M. Leonard, Early History of
English Poor Relief*

It is possible that the records of the Royal Mint, which, in a fragmentary
way, go back to 1580, may contain some references to America, but the in
formation received relative to these records indicated that the expenditure of
time required for a search for the scattered items that might possibly be
found, would not be justified.

The Secretary of the Baptist Union of Great Britain and Ireland, Baptist
Church House, Southampton Row, W. C, has informed us that their library
contains nothing that comes within the scope of this volume, and similar in
formation has been obtained from the London Missionary Society, 16 New
Bridge St., E. C, and from the Royal Geographical Society. The wills at
Somerset House have not been included because already so well dealt with
by Mr. Henry F. Waters.

Limitations of time, necessary dependence on indexes probably imperfect,
or, in a very few instances, restrictions imposed, prevented as complete a
search in certain of the minor archives as, under different circumstances,
might have been expedient. It is not improbable that the future investigator
may find material not here referred to in the archives of the House of Lords,
the diocese of Westminster, the Royal Society and the Hudson's Bay Com
pany, if not in other of the repositories.

The degree of completeness attained, however, is in great measure due to
the assistance so courteously rendered by the officials of the various reposi
tories examined. As a rule, much liberality was shown in permitting the in
spection of documents, and in several instances, especially in the case of some
of the smaller archives where special accommodations for searchers are not



*Pp. 229-230, note.



Prefaces. vii

provided, valuable aid was extended by the officials in charge at the cost of
no small inconvenience to themselves.

For permission to examine the contents of libraries and archives, grateful
acknowledgments are due to the Trustees of the British Museum, to the
Clerk of the Privy Council, to Sir Henry Graham, K. C. B., Clerk of Parlia
ments, to the Postmaster-General, to the Court of Common Council and the
Library Committee of the Guildhall of London, to the Clerk of the Peace,
Guildhall, Westminster, to the Archbishop of Canterbury, to the Bishop of
London, to the Secretaries of the Society for Promoting Christian Knowl
edge, of the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, and
of Dr. Bray's Associates, to the Archbishop of Westminster, to the Librarian
of Dr. Williams's Library, to the Secretaries of the Royal Society, to the
Right Honorable Lord Strathcona, K. C. M. G., Governor of the Hudson's
Bay Company, and to the Librarians of the Bodleian Library, of the several
college libraries at Oxford and of the Pepysian Library at Cambridge.

It may be useful to remark that, when there is no indication to the con
trary, year-dates are given in new style. The fact that a document is a copy
is often, but not invariably, noted.

No prediction is ventured as to the time when Professor Andrews's volume
relating to the Public Record Office will be published, nor as to any dispo
sition in print of the great store of data which the Department of Historical
Research has accumulated respecting transcripts from the British archives
now preserved in America and respecting printed documents from the same
repositories. It may, however, be well to mention that the slips containing
these data, gathered in pursuance of the original plan described at the open
ing of this preface, are in the possession of the Department and are at the
service of historical scholars.

J. FRANKLIN JAMESON.



In the preparation of this volume one object has been kept constantly in
view, namely, to furnish a guide which should be as helpful as possible to
students unfamiliar with the contents of British repositories of historical
manuscript and with the procedure to be followed in gaining access to them.
A complete history of documents in all the archives was manifestly impossi
ble, considering the limitations of time and space, yet in the collections herein
described, an effort has been made either to enter each document individually,
or to furnish such description or statement as would guide the investigator in
pursuing his researches further. No attempt has been made either by Miss
Davenport or by myself to exercise editorial judgment; our object being
simply to note each document or to describe each collection that concerned



viii Prefaces.

American history, without attempting to indicate its value for historical
purposes.

Certain features of the work as finally executed may be briefly mentioned.
In scope it includes not only the original thirteen colonies but, except in so
far as is indicated in Mr. Jameson's remarks above, the Canadian and West
Indian colonies also. Though the date 1783 marks its limit in time, it has
been deemed worth while to include occasionally documents of later date
when they appeared among the collections examined. No attempt has been
made to reproduce exactly the original titles or endorsements, even when
placed here within quotation marks, as to have done so would have cost much
valuable time and have furthered in no way the object of the undertaking.
References to works wherein documents are printed have been given when
known, but such references do not pretend to be complete. The same may be
said of references to transcripts. The largest collection of transcribed docu
ments from the British Museum and Bodleian libraries is in the Library of
Congress, and a complete list of all there to be found is printed at the end
of this volume. Annotations have been furnished when manifestly needed
or in cases where the interest of the document seemed to demand some
quotation or comment, but any elaborate system of annotations was clearly
inadvisable.

It is a pleasure to recall and to acknowledge the courtesies extended by
those in charge of the various repositories. In common with all who work in
the British Museum and Bodleian libraries I enjoyed the opportunities
offered to those who come of serious purpose. To Mr. F. Kenyon of the for
mer library and Mr. Falconer Madan of the latter I am specially indebted
for their kindness in reading the statements here printed introductory to
those collections. To Mr. Almeric W. FitzRoy, Clerk of the Privy Council, 1
am exceedingly grateful, not only for the liberality with which he placed
the valuable collections of that office at my disposal, but also for the interest
that he has taken in the furtherance of the cause of colonial history. To Mr.
Harrison of the same office I am also indebted for many helpful suggestions,
and to Mr. Moon for much personal aid in the actual work of investigation.
Dr. R. R. Sharpe, Records Clerk of the City of London, and the learned edi
tor of many volumes relating to its history, facilitated in every way my
search among the records of the Town Clerk's Office. Among the librarians
of the Oxford colleges Mr. Pottinger of Worcester and Mr. Holden of All
Souls placed me under many obligations for assistance rendered; while in
Cambridge, through the kindness of Dr. J. R. Tanner and of Mr. A. S. Ram
sey, Fellow of Magdalene, I was able to examine the contents of the Biblio-
theca Pepysiana. To Dr. Tanner in particular I am grateful for many
courtesies.

The difficulty of preparing the manuscript for the press, at so great a dis
tance from the repositories themselves, has been greatly lessened by the effi-



Prefaces. ix

cient assistance of Miss Edith Moodie, formerly secretary of the late Benja
min Franklin Stevens and now superintendent of the historical department
of the firm of B. F. Stevens and Brown. Her knowledge of the material in
England for American history is almost unrivalled, and the ability with
which she has met the various difficulties that have arisen is deserving of
hearty appreciation.

I am painfully aware that in a work containing so many details of volumes,
folios, pages, dates, names and descriptions errors are inevitable, but I can
say very earnestly that every care has been taken to render the work accurate
and reliable. While a re-examination of all the collections has not been pos
sible, the majority of the references to the documents in the British Museum
and Bodleian libraries have been carefully verified. It is needless to say that
corrections of any kind will be heartily welcomed.

CHARLES M. ANDREWS.



Grateful acknowledgment of aid in determining the character of the con
tents of the several archives examined by me is due to the following gentle
men : Mr. Cuthbert Headlam, one of the editors of The Manuscripts of the
House of Lords ; H. Buxton Forman, C. B., Second Secretary of the Post-
Office; Mr. J. G. Hendy, Curator of the Record Room of the Post-Office;
Mr. A. Owen, of Trinity House ; Dr. R. R. Sharpe, Records Clerk to the Cor
poration of the City of London; Mr. E. M. Borrajo, Librarian and Curator
of the Guildhall Library and Museum ; Mr. W. J. Hardy, editor of Middlesex 1
County Records; Calendar of the Sessions Books, 1689 to 1709 ; S. W. Ker-
shaw, M. A., Librarian of Lambeth Library; Rev. Sadler Phillips; Rev. Ed
mund McClure, one of the Secretaries of the Society for Promoting Chris
tian Knowledge ; Mr. C. F. Pascoe, Secretary of the Society for the Propa
gation of the Gospel in Foreign Parts ; Monsignor Bernard Ward, of St. Ed
mund's College, Old Hall, Ware; Rev. Thomas Hughes, S.J.; Rev. T. J.
Crippen, Librarian of the Congregational Library; Mr. Norman Penney,
Librarian of the Friends' Reference Library; Mr. Robert Harrison, Assist
ant Secretary of the Royal Society; Mr. William Ware, Secretary of the
Hudson's Bay Company ; and Mr. H. P. Biggar ; and to Miss Agnes C. Laut
and Miss Adelaide L. Fries. I am also indebted to Miss Louise F. Brown
for listing the papers at Fulham Palace ; and, for much valuable advice and
aid, generously given, to Mr. Hubert Hall, of the Public Record Office.

FRANCES G. DAVENPORT.



ABBREVIATIONS

Add. MSS. = Additional Manuscripts (British Museum).

A. W. I. = America and West Indies (Public Record Office, Colonial Office

Papers).

Bodl. Lib. = Bodleian Library.

Cal. Col. = Calendars of State Papers, Colonial.

D. K. Rep. = Reports of the Deputy Keeper of the Public Records.

H. =Dr. F. L. Hawks's transcripts.

N. Y. Docs. = Documents relative to the Colonial History of the State of New York.

P. or Perry's

Hist. Colls. = Bishop Perry's Historical Collections relating to the American Colo
nial Church.

Rec. Va. Co. = Records of the Virginia Company (as published by the Library of
Congress) .

R. H. S. = Royal Historical Society.



TABLE OF CONTENTS

PREFACES iii

THE BRITISH MUSEUM i

Introduction I

Collections of Manuscripts 7

Cottonian 7

Royal 8

Lansdowne 8

Stowe 17

Harleian 20

Hargrave 24

King's 25

Egerton 28

Sloane 50

Additional Charters 71

Briefs or Church Briefs 71

Additional Manuscripts 72

Newcastle Papers, pp. 123-143

PRIVY COUNCIL OFFICE 170

Privy Council Register 170

Unbound Papers 177

Miscellanea 185

WAR OFFICE LIBRARY 188

HOUSE OF LORDS 189

Introduction 189

List of Documents 192

GENERAL POST-OFFICE 273

TRINITY HOUSE 277

GUILDHALL 280

Corporation Records 280

Guildhall Library 283

WESTMINSTER GUILDHALL OR SESSIONS HOUSE 284

THE CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURT OR " OLD BAILEY " 285

LAMBETH PALACE LIBRARY 286

FULHAM PALACE 302

COMPANY FOR THE PROPAGATION OF THE GOSPEL IN NEW ENGLAND 330

SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING CHRISTIAN KNOWLEDGE 331

SOCIETY FOR THE PROPAGATION OF THE GOSPEL IN FOREIGN PARTS 332

xiii



xiv Contents.

MANUSCRIPTS OF DR. BRAY'S ASSOCIATES 334

SION COLLEGE LIBRARY 336

ARCHIVES OF THE ROMAN CATHOLIC DIOCESE OF WESTMINSTER 339

ENGLISH PROVINCE ARCHIVES S. J 342

DR. WILLIAMS'S LIBRARY 343

CONGREGATIONAL LIBRARY 347

FRIENDS' REFERENCE LIBRARY 350

THE ROYAL SOCIETY 355

Printed Material 356

Archives 363

Library 368

HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY 369

OXFORD : THE BODLEIAN LIBRARY 372

Introduction 372

Collections of Manuscripts 374

Tanner 374

Ashmolean 376

Rawlinson, A 380

B 396

C , 399

D 407

Letters 410

Clarendon 410

Copper Plates 421

OXFORD COLLEGE LIBRARIES , 422

CAMBRIDGE : MAGDALENE COLLEGE 424

Bibliotheca Pepysiana 424

The Ferrar Papers 429

TRANSCRIPTS IN THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS 431

INDEX 447



THE BRITISH MUSEUM.

THE British Museum on Great Russell Street is open every day in the
week except Sunday, and except Good Friday, Christmas day, and any fast
or thanksgiving day appointed by authority ; except also the first four week
days of March and September. The Reading Room or Round Room is
open from nine in the morning until eight in the evening from September
to April, inclusive, and till seven during the other months. The Manuscript
Room or Students' Room is open from ten in the morning till five in the
afternoon.

Manuscript volumes must normally be used in the Students' Room, but
by special permission ordinary manuscripts may be transferred to the Read
ing Room after the Students' Room is closed. Printed books may be
brought from the Reading Room to the Students' Room, if sufficient reason
can be shown therefor. Manuscripts cannot be obtained after four o'clock
nor printed books after half-past three in January, February, November
and December, half-past four in March and October, half-past five in April
and September, and half-past six in May, June, July and August. Books
may, however, be called for at any time during the earlier hours of the day
and will be held at the central desk in the Reading Room until wanted, if



Online LibraryCharles McLean AndrewsGuide to the manuscript materials for the history of the United States to 1783, in the British Museum, in minor London archives, and in the libraries of Oxford and Cambridge → online text (page 1 of 60)