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THE DOVE IN THE EAGLES NEST.



THE



DOVE IN THE EAGLE'S NEST.



AUTHOR OF THE "HEIR OF REDCLYFFE."



IN TWO VOLUMES.
VOL. II.



MACMILLAN AXD CO.

1866.



LONDON :

I'.. (LAY. SON. AND TAYLOR. PRIN1JSRS

BREAD 8THEET HILL.



<?5

v. ^



CONTENTS OF VOL. II.



CHAPTER I.



PAGK
THE DOUBLE-HEADED EAGLE 1



CHAPTER II.

THE RIVAL EYRIE 34

CHAPTER III.

THE EAGLE AND THE SNAKE 57

CHAPTER IV.

BRIDGING THE FORD 70

CHAPTER V.

FRIEDMUND IN THE CLOUDS 05

CHAPTER VI

THE FIGHT AT THE FORD 106



6 CONTENTS.



CHAPTER VTT.



PAGE

THE WOUNDED EAGLE • • . . 125



CHAPTER VIII.

RITTER THETJRDANK 144

CHAPTER IX.

PEACE 157



CHAPTER. X.

I

THE ALTAR OF PEACE 176



CHAPTER XI.

OLD IRON AND NEW STEEL 193

CHAPTER XII.

THE STAR AND THE SPARK 231



THF

DOVE IN THE EAGLE'S NEST.

CHAPTER I.

THE DOUBLE-HEADED EAGLE.

One summer evening, when shooting at a bird on
a pole was in full exercise in the tilt-yard, the sports
were interrupted by a message from the Provost that
a harbinger had brought tidings that the Imperial
court was within a day's journey.

All was preparation. Fresh sand had to be strewn
on the arena. New tapestry hangings were to deck
the galleries, the houses and balconies to be brave
with drapery, the fountain in the market-place was
to play Rhine wine, all Ulm was astir to do honour
to itself and to the Kaisar, and Ebbo stood amid all
the bustle, drawing lines in the sand with the stock
of his arblast, subject to all that oppressive self-
magnification so frequent in early youth, and which

VOL. II. B



2, THE DOVE IN THE EAGLE S NEST.

made it seem to him as if the Kaisar and the King
of the Romans were coming to Ulm with the mere
purpose of destroying his independence, and as if the
eyes of all Germany were watching for his humi-
liation.

" See ! see ! " suddenly exclaimed Friedel ; " Look !
there is something among the tracery of the Dome
Kirk Tower. Is if man or bird ? "

" Bird, folly ! Thou couldst see no bird less than
an eagle from hence/' said Ebbo. " No doubt the}'
are about to hoist a banner."

" That is not their wont," returned Sir Kasimir.

"I see him," interrupted Ebbo. "Nay, but he is a
bold climber ! We went up to that stage, close to
the balcony, but there's no footing beyond but crockets
and canopies."

"And a bit of rotten scaffold," added Friedel.
" Perhaps he is a builder going to examine it ! Up
higher, higher ! "

" A builder ! " said Ebbo ; " a man with a head
and foot like that should be a chamois hunter !
Shouldst thou deem it worse than the Eed Eyrie,
Friedel ? "

" Yea, truly ! The depth beneath is plainer !
There would be no climbing there without "



THE DOVE IX THE EAGLE S XEST. 3

" Without what, cousin % " asked Wildschloss.

" Without great cause/' said Friedel. " It is fear-
ful ! He is like a fly against the sky."

" Beaten again ! " muttered Ebbo ; " I did think
that none of these town-bred fellows could surpass
us when it came to a giddy height ! Who can
he be?"

"Look! look!" burst out Friedel, "The saints
protect him ! He is on that narrowest topmost
ledge — measuring ; his heel is over the parapet —
half his foot ! "

" Holding on by the rotten scaffold pole ! St. Bar-
bara be his speed ; but he is a brave man ! " shouted
Ebbo ; " Oh ! the pole has broken."

" Heaven forefend ! " cried Wildschloss, with de-
spair on his face unseen by the boys, for Friedel had
hidden his eyes, and Ebbo was straining his with the
intense gaze of horror! "He had carried his glance
downwards, following the 380 feet fall that must be
the lot of the adventurer. Then looking up again
he shouted, " I see him ! I see him ! Praise to St.
Barbara ! He is safe ! He has caught by the up-
right stone work."

" Where ? where ? Show me ! " cried Wildschloss,
grasping Ebbo's arm.

b2



4 THE DOVE IX THE EAGLES NEST.

" There ! clinging to that upright bit of tracery,
stretching his foot out to yonder crocket."

" I cannot see. Mine eyes swim and dazzle," said
Wildschloss. " Merciful heavens ! is this another
tempting of Providence ? How is it with him now,
Ebbo?"

" Swarming down another slender bit of the stone
network. It must be easy now to one who could
keep head and hand steady in such a shock."

" There ! " added Friedel, after a breathless space,
" he is on the lower parapet, whence begins the stair.
Do you know him, sir ? Who is he ? "

" Either a Venetian mountebank," said Wildschloss,
" or else there is only one man I know of either so
foolhardy or so steady of head."

" Be he who he may," said Ebbo, " he is the
brd|fest man that ever I beheld. Who is he, Sir
Kasimir?"

" An eagle of higher flight than ours, no doubt,"
said Wildschloss. " But come ; we shall reach the
Dome Kirk by the time the climber has wound his
way down the turret stairs, and we shall see what
like he is."

Their coming was well timed, for a small door at
the foot of the tower was just opening to give exit to



THE DOVE IX THE EAGLE S NEST. 5

a very tall knight, in one of those short Spanish
cloaks the collar of which could be raised so as to
conceal the face. He looked to the right and left,
and had one hand raised to put up the collar when
he recognised Sir Kasimir, and, holding out both
hands, exclaimed, " Ha, Adlerstein ! well met ! I
looked to see thee here. No unbonneting ; I am
not come yet. I am at Strasburg, with the Kaisar
and the Archduke, and am not here till we ride in,
in purple and in pall by the time the good folk have
hung out their arras, and donned their gold chains,
and conned their speeches, and mounted their
mules."

" Well that their speeches are not over the lyke-
wake of his kingly kaisarly highness," gravely re-
turned Sir Kasimir.

" Ha ! Thou sawest ? I came out here to Jfcoid
the gaping throng, who don't know what a hunter
can do. I have been in worse case in the Tyrol.
Snowdrifts are worse footing than stone vine
leaves."

"Where abides your highness?" asked Wildsch-
loss.

" I ride back again to the halting-place for the
night, and meet my father in time to do my part in



6 THE DOVE IN THE EAGLE'S NEST.

the pageant. I was sick of the addresses, and, more-
over, the purse-proud Flemings have made such a
stiff little fop of my poor boy that I am ashamed to
look at him, or hear his French accent. So I rode
off to get a view of this notable Dom in peace, ere
it be bedizened in holiday garb ; and one can't stir
without all the Chapter waddling after one."

"Your highness has found means of distancing
them."

" Why, truly, the Prior would scarce delight in the
view from yonder parapet," laughed his highness.
" Ha ! Adlerstein, where didst get such a perfect pair
of pages ? I would I could ma^ch my hounds as
well."

" They are no pages of mine, so please you," said
the knight ; " rather this is the head of my name. Let
me present to your kingly highness the Freiherr von
Adlerstein."

" Thou dost not thyself distinguish between them!"
said Maximilian, as Friedmund stepped back, putting
forward Eberhard, whose bright, lively smile of in-
terest and admiration had been the cause of his
cousin's mistake. They would have doffed their
caps and bent the knee, but were hastily checked
by Maximilian. " No, no, Junkern, I shall owe you



THE DOVE IX THE EAGLES NEST. 7

no thanks for bringing all the street on me ! — that's
enough. Eeserve the rest for Kaisar Fritz." Then,
familiarly taking Sir Kasimir's arm, he walked on,
saying, " I remember now. Thou wentest after an
inheritance from the old Mouser of the Debateable
Ford, and wert ousted by a couple of lusty boys
sprung of a peasant wedlock."

" Nay, my lord, of a burgher lady, fair as she is
wise and virtuous ; who, spite of all hindrances, has
bred up these youths in all good and noble nurture."

" Is this so ? " said the king, turning sharp round
on the twins. "Are ye minded to quit freeboot-
ing, and come a crusading against the Turks with
me?"

"Everywhere with such a leader !" enthusiastically
exclaimed Ebbo.

" What ? up there ? " said Maximilian, smiling.
" Thou hast the tread of a chamois-hunter."

"Eriedei has been on the Eed Eyrie," exclaimed
Ebbo ; then, thinking he had spoken foolishly, he
coloured.

" Which is the Eed Eyrie ? " good-humouredly
asked the king.

"It is the crag above our castle," said Eriedei, \
modestly.



8 THE DOVE IN THE EAGLE'S NEST.

"None other has been there," added Ebbo, per-
ceiving his auditor's interest ; " but he saw the eagle
flying away with a poor widow's kid, and the sight
must have given him wings, for we never could find
the same path ; but here is one of the feathers he
brought down " — taking off his cap so as to show a
feather rather the worse for wear, and sheltered
behind a fresher one.

"Nay," said Friedel, "thou shouldst say that I
came to a ledge where I had like to have stayed
all night, but that ye all came out with men and
ropes."

" We know what such a case is ! " said the king.
" It has chanced to us to hang between heaven and
earth ; I've even had the Holy Sacrament held up
for my last pious gaze by those who gave me up for
lost on the mountain side. Adlerstein ? The peak
above the Braunwasser? Some day shall ye show
me this eyrie of yours, and we will see whether we
can amaze our cousins the eagles. We see you at
our father's court to-morrow ? " he graciously added,, fl
and Ebbo gave a ready bow of acquiescence. %

" There," said the king, as after their dismissal he
walked on with Sir Kasirair, "never blame me for
rashness and imprudence. Here has this height of;



THE DOTE IX THE EAGLE'S NEST. 9

the steeple proved the height of policy. It has made
a loyal subject of a Mouser on the spot."

"Pray Heaven it may have won a heart, true
though proud ! " said Wildschloss ; u hut mousing
was cured before by the wise training of the mother.
Your highness will have taken out the sting of sub-
mission, and you will scarce find more faithful sub-
jects/'

" How old are the Junkern ? "

" Some sixteen years, your highness."

" That is what living among mountains does for a
lad. Why could not those thrice-accursed Flemish
towns let me breed up my boy to be good for some-
thing in the mountains, instead of getting duck-
footed and muddy witted in the fens ? "

In the meantime Ebbo and Friedel were returning
home in that sort of passion of enthusiasm that
ingenuous boyhood feels when first brought into
contact with greatness or brilliant qualities.

And brilliance was the striking point in Maxi-
milian. The Last of the Knights, in spite of his
many defects, was, by personal qualities, and the
hereditary influence of long-descended rank, verily a
king of men in aspect and demeanour, even when
most careless and simple. He was at this time a



10 THE DOVE IN THE EAGLE'S NEST.

year or two past thirty, unusually tall, and with
a form at once majestic and full of vigour and
activity; a noble, fair, though sunburnt countenance ;
eyes of dark grey, almost black; long fair hair, a
keen aquiline nose, a lip only beginning to lengthen
to the characteristic Austrian feature, an expression
always lofty, sometimes dreamy, and yet at the same
time full of acuteness and humour. His abilities
were of the highest order, his purposes, especially at
this period of his life, most noble and becoming in
the first prince of Christendom ; and, if his life were
a failure, and his reputation unworthy of his endow-
ments, the cause seems to have been in great measure
the bewilderment and confusion that unusual gifts
sometimes cause to their possessor, whose sight their
conflicting illumination dazzles so as to impair his
steadiness of aim, while their contending gleams
light him into various directions, so that one object
is deserted for another ere its completion. Thus
Maximilian cuts a figure in history far inferior to
that made by his grandson, Charles V. whom he
nevertheless excelled in every personal quality, ex-
cept the most needful of all, force of character ; and,
in like manner, his remote descendant, the narrow-
minded Ferdinand of Styria gained his ends, though



THE DOVE IN THE EAGLE'S NEST. 11

the able and brilliant Joseph II. was to die broken-
hearted, calling his reign a failure and mistake.
However, such terms as these could not be applied
to Maximilian with regard to home affairs. He has
had hard measure from those who have only regarded
his vacillating foreign policy, especially with respect
to Italy — ever the temptation and the bane of
Austria ; but even here much of his uncertain con-
duct was owing to the unfulfilled promises of what
he himself called his " realm of kings/' and a sove-
reign can only justly be estimated by his domestic
policy. The contrast of the empire before his time
with the subsequent Germany is that of chaos with
order. Since the death of Friedrich II. the Imperial
title had been a mockery, making the prince who
chanced to bear it a mere mark for the spite of his
rivals ; there was no centre of justice, no appeal ;
everybody might make war on everybody, with the
sole preliminary of exchanging a challenge ; " fist-
right " was the acknowledged law of the land ; and,
except in the free cities, and under such a happy
accident as a right-minded prince here and there, the
state of Germany seems to have been rather worse
than that of Scotland from Bruce to the union of the
Crowns. Under Maximilian, the Diet became an



12 THE DOVE IN THE EAGLE'S NEST.

effective council, fist-right was abolished, independent
robber-lords put down, civilization began to effect an
entrance, the system of circles was arranged, and the
empire again became a leading power in Europe,
instead of a mere vortex of disorder and misrule.
Never would Charles V. have held the position he
occupied had he come after an ordinary man, instead
of after an able and sagacious reformer like that
Maximilian who is popularly regarded as a fantastic
caricature of a knight-errant, marred by avarice and
weakness of purpose.

At the juncture of which we are writing, none of
Maximilian's less worthy qualities had appeared ; he
had not been rendered shifty and unscrupulous by
difficulties and disappointments in money-matters,
and had not found it impossible to keep many of the
promises he had given in all good faith. He stood forth
as the hope of Germany, in salient contrast to the
feeble and avaricious father, who was felt to be the
only obstacle in the way of his noble designs of
establishing peace and good discipline in the empire,
and conducting a general crusade against the Turks,
whose progress was the most threatening peril of
Christendom. His fame was, of course, frequently
discussed amon^ the citizens, with whom he was



THE DOVE IX THE EAGLE'S NEST. 13

very popular, not only from his ease and freedom of
manner, but because his graceful tastes, his love of
painting, sculpture, architecture, and the mechanical
turn which made him an improver of fire-arms and a
patron of painting and engraving, rendered their
society more agreeable to him than that of his dull,
barbarous nobility. Ebbo had heard so much of the
perfections of the King of the Eomans as to be pre-
pared to hate him ; but the boy, as we have seen,
was of a generous, sensitive nature, peculiarly prone
to enthusiastic impressions of veneration ; and
Maximilian's high-spirited manhood, personal fas-
cination, and individual kindness had so entirely
taken him by surprise, that he talked of him all the
evening in a more fervid manner than did even
Friedel, though both could scarcely rest for their an-
ticipations of seeing him on the morrow in the full
state of his entry.

Richly clad, and mounted on cream-coloured
steeds, nearly as much alike as themselves, the twins
were a pleasant sight for a proud mother's eyes, as
they rode out to take their place in the procession
that was to welcome the royal guests. Master Sorel,
in ample gown, richly furred, with medal and chain
of office, likewise went forth as Gruildmaster ; and



14 THE DOVE IN THE EAGLE'S NEST.

Christina, with smiling lips and liquid eyes, recol-
lected the days when to see him in such array was
her keenest pleasure, and the utmost splendour her
fancy could depict.

Arrayed, as her sons loved to see her, in black
velvet, and with pearl-bordered cap, Christina sat by
her aunt in the tapestried balcony, and between them
stood or sat little Thekla von Adlerstein Wildschloss,
whose father had entrusted her to their care, to see
the procession pass by. A rich Eastern carpet, of
gorgeous colouring, covered the upper balustrade, over
which they leant, in somewhat close quarters with
the scarlet-bodiced dames of the opposite house, but
with ample space for sight up and down the rows of
smiling expectants at each balcony, or window,
equally gay with hangings, while the bells of all the
churches clashed forth their gayest chimes, and fitful
bursts of music were borne upon the breeze. Little
Thekla danced in the narrow space for very glee, and
wondered why any one should live in a cloister when
the world was so wide and so fair. And Dame
Johanna tried to say something pious of worldly
temptations, and the cloister shelter ; but Thekla in-
terrupted her, and, clinging to Christina, exclaimed,
" Nay, but I am always naughty with Mother Lud-



THE DOVE IN THE EAGLE' S NEST. 15

milk in the convent, and I know I should never be
naughty out here with you and the barons ; I should
be so happy."

" Hush ! hush ! little one ; here they come ! "
On they came — stout lanzknechts first, the city
guard with steel helmets unadorned, buff suits, and
bearing either harquebuses, halberts, or those hand-
some but terrible weapons, morning stars. Then fol-
lowed guild after guild, each preceded by the banner
bearing its homely emblem — the cauldron of the
smiths, the hose of the clothiers, the helmet of the
armourers, the bason of the barbers, the boot of the
sutors ; even the sausage of the cooks, and the shoe
of the shoeblacks, were represented, as by men who
gloried in the calling in which they did life's duty
and task.

First in each of these bands marched the prentices,
stout, broad, flat-faced lads, from twenty to fourteen
years of age, with hair like tow hanging from under
their blue caps, staves in their hands, and knives at
their girdles. Behind them came the journeymen, in
leathern jerkins and steel caps, and armed with
halberts or cross-bows ; men of all ages, from sixty to
one or two and twenty, and many of the younger
ones with foreign countenances and garb betokening



16 THE DOVE IN THE EAGLETS XEST.

that they were strangers spending part of their wan-
dering years in studying the Ulm fashions of their
craft. Each trade showed a large array of these
juniors ; but the masters who came behind were
comparatively few, mostly elderly, long-gowned, gold-
chained personages, with a weight of solid dignity on
their wise brows — men who respected themselves,
made others respect them, and kept their city a
peaceful, well-ordered haven, while storms raged in
the realm beyond — men too who had raised to the
glory of their God a temple, not indeed fulfilling the
original design, but a noble effort, and grand monu-
ment of burgher devotion.

Then came the ragged regiment of scholars, wild
lads from every part of Germany and Switzerland,
some wan and pinched with hardship and privation,
others sturdy, selfish rogues, evidently well able to
take care of themselves. There were many rude,
tyrannical-looking lads among the older lads ; and,
though here and there a studious, earnest face might
be remarked, the prospect of Germany's future priests
and teachers was not encouraging. And what a
searching ordeal was awaiting those careless lads
when the voice of one, as yet still a student, should
ring through Germany !



THE DOVE IN THE EAGLE'S NEST. 17

Contrasting with these ill-kempt pupils marched
the grave professors and teachers, in square eccle-
siastic caps and long gowns, whose colours marked
their degrees and the Universities that had conferred
them — some thin, some portly, some jocund, others
dreamy ; some observing all the humours around,
others still intent on Aristotelian ethics ; all men of
high fame; with doctor at the beginning of their
names, and ** or " or " us " at the close of them. After
them rode the magistracy, a burgomaster from each
guild, and the Herr Provost himself — as great a
potentate within his own walls as the Doge of Venice
or of Genoa, or perhaps greater, because less jealously
hampered. In this dignified group was Uncle Gott-
fried, by complacent nod and smile acknowledging
his good wife and niece, who indeed had received
many a previous glance and bow from friends passing
beneath. But Master Sorel was no new spectacle in
a civic procession, and the sight of him was only a
pleasant fillip to the excitement of his ladies.

Here was jingling of spurs and trampling of horses ;
heraldic achievements showed upon the banners,
round which rode the mail-clad retainers of country
nobles who had mustered to meet their lords. Then,
with still more of clank and tramp, rode a bright-

VOL. II. C



18 THE DOVE IN THE EAGLE'S NEST.

faced troop of lads, with feathered caps and gay
mantles. Young Count Budiger looked up with cour-
teous salutation; and just behind him, with smiling
lips and upraised faces, were the pair whose dark
eyes, dark hair, and slender forms, rendered them
conspicuous among the fair Teutonic youth. Each
cap was taken off and waved, and each pair of
lustrous eyes glanced up pleasure and exultation at
the sight of the lovely " Mutterlein." And she ?
The pageant was well-nigh over to her, save for
heartily agreeing with Aunt Johanna that there was
not a young noble of them all to compare with the
twin Barons of Adlerstein ! However, she knew she
should be called to account if she did not look well
at * the Eomish King ;" besides, Thekla was shriek-
ing with delight at the sight of her father, tall and
splendid on his mighty black charger, with a smile
for his child, and for the lady a bow so low and
deferential that it was evidently remarked by those
at whose approach every lady in the balconies was
rising, every head in the street was bared.

A tall, thin, shrivelled, but exceedingly stately old
man on a grey horse was in the centre. Clad in a
purple velvet mantle^ and bowing as he went, he
looked truly the TCaisar, to whom stately courtesy



THE DOVE IN THE EAGLE'S NEST. 19

was second nature. On one side, in black and gold,
with the jewel of the Golden Fleece on his breast,
rode Maximilian, responding gracefully to the saluta-
tions of the people, but his keen grey eye roving in
search of the object of Sir Kasirnir's salute, and
lighting on Christina with such a rapid, amused
glance of discovery that, in her confusion, she missed
what excited Dame Johanna's rapturous admiration
— the handsome boy on the Emperor's other side,
a fair, plump lad, the young sovereign of the Low
Countries, beautiful in feature and complexion, but
lacking the lire and the loftiness that characterised
his father's countenance. The train was closed by
the Eeitern of the Emperor's guard — steel-clad mer-
cenaries who were looked on with no friendly eyes
by the few gazers in the street who had been left
behind in the general rush to keep up with the
attractive part of the show.

Pageants of elaborate mythological character im-
peded the imperial progress at every stage, and it was
full two hours ere the two youths returned, heartily
weary of the lengthened ceremonial, and laughing
at having actually seen the King of the Eomans
enduring to be conducted from shrine to shrine in
the cathedral by a large proportion of its dignitaries.
02



20 THE DOVE IN THE EAGLE'S NEST.

Ebbo was sure he had caught an archly disconsolate
wink !

Ebbo had to dress for the banquet spread in the
town-hall. Space was wanting for the concourse of
guests, and Master Sorel had decided that the younger
Baron should not be included in the invitation.
Friedel pardoned him more easily than did Ebbo,
who not only resented any slight to his double, but


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