Chintaman Vinayak Vaidya.

History of mediæval Hindu India (being a history of India from 600 to 1200 A.D.) .. (Volume 1) online

. (page 22 of 38)
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Yasaskara, a Brahmin himself, son of Prabhakaradeva,
the powerful minister of Sugandha who had left ihe
country owing to misfortune, accidentally came back at
this time and was hailed by the Brahmins as king on the
sixth day. Kamalavardhana and the people acquiesced
and Yasaskara was anointed king amisdst public acclama
tions.

Yasaskara as usual with the founder of a new dynasty
proved a capable, energetic and conscientious king. He
of course sent back the Brahmins to their sacrifices and
29



226 TiHE I'^IRST HINDU KINGDOMS

ruled with regour and scrupulousness. The poet's re-
marks here are worth quoting: "In his days people slept
in their houses with open doors and travellers moved
without peril on their paths owing to the destruction of
thieves. Villagers were engrossed in cultivation and had
no occasion to visit the court and Brahmins remained
engrossed in their studies and had no occasion to take up
arms. Brahmin sages on pretext of reciting Samas did
not drink liquor nor did ascetics tend sons, wives, cattle
or fields. Nor did religious men with fools for their
teachers sacrifice with fish and Apupa or cakes, disputing
with their own compositions based on Tarka or guess the
principles of Veda. Nor did house-wives, worshipping
false 'gurus', with shakes of their heads transgress their
husbands. And lastly no astrologer, physician, juryman,
teacher, counsellor, preceptor (purohita), herald, judge, and
writer was uneducated in his days ". This gives a
very vivid picture of the social and political condition of
the country under good and bad rulers. Yasaskara, how-
ever, had only a short reign of 9 years and he was suc-
ceeded by his son Sangramadeva in 24 (4024-3076 = 948
A. D.) He was a minor and the forces of disorder, oppres-
sion and licentiousness soon took possession of the land.
Parvagupta, a leader of Ekangas, Samantas, Kayasthas.
aad Tantris seized the throne. After a short rule he was
succeeded by his son Kshemagupta (either a Kshatriya or
a Vaisya) who married the notorious Didda daughter of a
king of Lohara named Sinharaja and grand-daughter of a
Shahi king of Kabul named Bhimapala. This Didda had a
long reign after Kshemgupta who died in 34 (see VI, 187)
i. ('. in 4034 - 3076 = 958 A. D. During the minority of her
son Abhimanyu and after his death in 44 in minority,
during that of her grandson Nandigupta and after his
death, during a similar minority of hisbrotherBhimagupta
and when he died or was killed she herself in her own name,
ruled by the aid of Tantris and a minister-lover named
Tunga a Khasa by race- She eventually elected her
brother's son Sangramaraja of the Lohara family as her
successor and thus began the Lohara dynasty in Kashmir-



II LATER HISTORY OF KASHMIR 227

This heartless queen noted for her great oppression of the
people enhanced by the machinations of unscrupulous
ministers ranging themselves on one side or an



Online LibraryChintaman Vinayak VaidyaHistory of mediæval Hindu India (being a history of India from 600 to 1200 A.D.) .. (Volume 1) → online text (page 22 of 38)