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which is controlled in this city by the said telegraph association, under the pro-
visions of existing perpetual contracts between the owners of said patents and
said association ; and

Whereas^ The said telegraph association has constructed a subway system in
this city, and reserved in it for the Fire and Police departments one duct, which
makes it necessary for the Fire Department to change its system of wires from
poles to subway in order to obtain the best results and telephone system ; and

Whereast The City and Suburban Telegraph Association, through its general
manager, has submitted a proposition agreeing to furnish and rent for a term of
ten years all the telephones, transmitters, magnet bells, and battery boxes with
backboards necessary to equip all engine-houses, offices, and other departments
of the Cincinnati Fire Department, and residences of the members of the Board
of Fire Trustees and officers of said department, the same to be connected to
and used in connection with the switchboard owned by said telegraph associa-
tion and rented to the Fire Department for an annual rental of fourteen dollars
($14) for each set of instruments so furnished, a set to consist of one Blake
transmitter, one hand telephone with cords, one magnet bell, and one battery
box with backboard, with the understanding that long-distance transmitters and
bridging magnet bells will be furnished for all metallic circuit lines ; and

Wkereasj By Ordinance No. 491, passed March 31, 1893, and approved
April I, 1893, the city of Cincinnati, acting through the Board of Fire Trustees,
has been authorized and empowered to contract with the City and Suburban
Telegraph Association as hereafter provided :

Nowy therefore^ This is to witness that it is hereby agreed by and between
the city of Cincinnati, party of the first part, and the City and Suburban Tele-
graph Association, a corporation organized under the laws of the State of Ohio,
party of the second part, that in consideration of the premises, and for and in
consideration of an annual rental of fourteen dollars ($14) per set, payable
annually, the party of the second part agrees and binds itself to furnish and
deliver to the party of the first part, from time to time as may be found neces-
sary, for and during the term of ten years from the first day of July, 1893, all
and as many sets of telephone instruments — a set to consist of one transmitter,
one hand telephone, one magnet bell, and one battery box with backboard — as
may be required to fully equip all engine-houses, offices, and other departments
of the Cincinnati Fire Department, and the residences of the members of the
Board of Fire Trustees and officers of said department, the same to be con-
nected to and used only in connection with the switchboard owned by the party
of the second part and rented by the party of the first part.

It is further agreed that should the cost to the party of the second part for
performing this contract be diminished at any time while it is in force, by reason
of the expiration of letters patent or any of them covering the instruments or
devices, or any of them, whereby the party of the second part would be relieved



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500 Annual Report



from liabilities to pay royalties, then and in that event the party of the first part
is to have the benefit of a corresponding reduction in the cost to it of the
rentals to be paid under this contract as herein provided.

It is further agreed by and between the parties hereto that the payments
of said rentals shall begin on and after the first day of July, 1893, on such
instruments as may have been delivered by the party of the second part to the
party of the first part prior to that date, and on all other instruments that may
be required from time to time for the exclusive use of said fire department from
the date of delivery.

This contract is to continue in force for the term of ten years from and after
the first day of July, 1893, »"<! the parties hereto agree and bind themselves
each with the other to carry out the provisions of this contract for the full term
herein provided.



AN ORDINANCE, NO. 40.

For the Protection of Public Cisterns, Fire plugs, &c.

Section i. Be it ordained by the Board of Legislation of the City of
Cincinnati^ That it shall be unlawful for any person or persons to place anr
building materials, or any other obstruction whatever, within eighteen feet
of the center cap of any public cistern or public hydrant or fire-plug; and
any person or persons so offending against the provisions of this ordinance
shall, on conviction thereof in the Police Court, be fined in any sum not less
than ten dollars nor exceeding fifty dollars, together with the costs of suit.

Sec. 2. An ordinance to amend an ordinance for the protection of
public fire-cisterns, passed July 31, 1846, is hereby repealed.

Sec. 3. This ordinance shall take effect and be in force from and after
the earliest period allowed by law.

Passed July 12, A. D. 1897.

SCOTT BON HAM,
President Board of Legislation.

Attest: EDWIN HENDERSON, City Clerk,



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I^0LL 0P H0N0R.



Establtahed by Resolution of the BoartI of Fire Trustees, June 18, 1801.



JOHN ROMES,

Captain H. & L. Co. No. 7.
For rescuing an aged man, Mr. Wm. Lrach, from a burning build-
ing, located at Nos. 21-23 East Ninth Street, on December 17, 1892,
at 2:12 o'clock a. m.

Captain H. & L. Co. No. 6.
For aiding in the rescue of two children, John Dihkbns and Thomas
Powers, from a burning building, located at No. }^5 Carlisle Avenue,
at 8:2.5 p. m.. December 18, 1897.



L. F. WEH RMANN,

Lieutenant H. & L. Co. No. 1,
For rescuing a child, Ida Mincowsrt, from a burning building.
No. 329 West Sixth Street, on October 9, 1895, at 12:36 o'clock a. m.
For stopping runaway team of Ladder Co. No. 1, while responding
to an alarm of fire from Box 645, February 11, 1896, at 10 o'clock a. m.



ALBERT ACKERMAN,

Member H. & L. Co. No. 4,
For exercising cool judgment and performing his duty under trying
circumstances, in guiding a runaway team while responding to an
alarm of fire from Box 643, November 19, 1896, at 11 :12 o'clock a. m.



JOHN KORTE,

Lieutenant H.&L. Co. No. ,
For aiding in the rescue of two children, John Diskens and Thomas
Powers, from a burning building, located at No. 846 Carlisle Avenue,
at 8:25 p. M., December 18, 1897.



LEONARD WESTCOTT,

Member Tool- Wagon No. 1,
For aiding in the rescue of two children, John Diskens and Thomas
Powers, from a burning building located at No. 845 Carlisle Avenue,
at 8:25 p. M., December 18, 1897.



JAMES BOYLE,

Member Fire Co. No. 2,
For rescuing from drowning in a cistern the otvild. of Hbnrt and
Edna Weidemann, at their residence, No. 931 Freeman Avenue, at
4:20 P. M., December 9, 1897.



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ANNUAL REPORT



Non-Partisan Board of Police Commissioners



AND OF THE



Police and Workhouse Departments
OF Cincinnati, Ohio.

1901



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M EMBERS



NON-PARTISAN BOARD OF POLICE COMMISSIONERS



As Organized January, 1002.



MAX BURGHEIM, President,

Term Expires April 1, 1901,.

GEORGE HENSHAW, Vice-President,

Term Expires April 1, 190/,,

C. B. WING,

Term Expires April 1, 190t.

JAMES W. FAULKNER,

Term Expires April /, I90f.

W. H. HARRISON, CierA,

J. C. CALLAHAN, Assistant Clerk,

MARGARET C. ViQ^XQOlA., Stenographer,



Organization for lOOi.



C. B. WING, President,
MAX BURGHEIM. Vice-President,
JAMES W. FAULKNER,
GEORGE HENSHAW.



W. H. Harrison, Clerh,



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REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT.



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REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT



Non-Partisan Board of Police Commissioners



Cincinnati, O., January i, 1902.

To His Excellency, George K. Nash, Governor^

AND TO His Honor, Julius Fleischmann, Mayor:

Gentlemen, — I have the honor to submit herewith my
report of the proceedings of the Non - Partisan Board of
Police Commissioners of the City of Cincinnati for the year
1901. Taken altogether, the year has been uneventful in
police matters, and very little beyond the ordinary routine
of police business has been brought to the attention of the
Board. Affairs generally have been considered with a view,
where practicable, to improving every department of the
system, and in getting the best results with the means at
hand. Economy has been the watchword of the members
of the Board, and all expenditures have been within the
lines of retrenchment, as far as possible, without injury to
the service.

While public opinion has awarded to Cincinnati the
compliment of having the best police department in the



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510 President's Report



country, and Cincinnati the best governed city in police
matters, it must be admitted that the police authorities have
been hampered by the lack of funds with which to organize
a department to meet the requirements of our fast-growing
population. With a territory something over thirty -five
square miles to be protected by about 330 patrolmen, it is,
to say the least, considerable of an undertaking. In 1886,
when the present non-partisan police law was enacted, a
force of 4(X) patrolmen was authorized, but the maximum
number carried on the rolls has never exceeded 397, for the
reason that the appropriations for the Police Department
would never justify the appointment of the full number
allowed by law. Within the past five years an area of about
ten square miles has been added to our territory*, and several
thousand added to the population of the city, by annexation,
who thus become entitled to the protection of our department.
Two years ago the last General Assembly passed an
amendment to the law, authorizing the appointment of 100
additional patrolmen, 30 corporals, and 4 captains. At that
time it was expected that several villages and hamlets would
be added to the city by annexation, and the amendment
was adopted with a view to meeting the emergency of more
territory and a larger population to be protected. At the
time there was an understanding between the members of
the Board of Police Commissioners and the Hamilton County-
delegation in the General Assembly that if annexation failed
the force should not be increased, at least at once, and there
the matter rests at this time, although the Board could by
law appoint the additional policemen if the appropriation
should be enlarged to justify such action. That the force
should now be increased to the maximum allowed by law
there is not the shadow of a doubt, for during the past year



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Non-Partisan Board of Police Commissioners 511

many demands have been made for increased police protec-
tion. Especially is this the case in the newly -acquired
territory, where in some instances a single oflBcer has been
required to cover a district nearly two miles in extent.

All citizens are entitled to police protection for their lives
and property, a fact which is not fully guaranteed under the
present conditions of affairs; and many are compelled to
secure the services of private policemen to guard their homes
at an additional individual expense, notwithstanding the fact
that they are taxed in a general way for the support of the
state and city governments. The police and fire depart-
ments go together hand in hand in the protection of life and
property, and more liberal treatment in the apportionment
of funds with which to prosecute their work would result, in
my opinion, advantageously to the city.

Organization for 1901.

The first regular meeting of the Board this year was held
January 2d, at which all the members were present, and the
following officers were elected to serve during the year :

C. B. WING President;

MAX BURGHEIM Vice-president ;

W. H. HARRISON Clerk.

Board Meetings.

There were fifty-five regular and special meetings held
during the year just closed, at which the regular business
of the Board was taken up and disposed of. The attendance
at these meetings was about the average, and at no time was
important public business neglected.



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512 President's Report



Buildings and Improvements.

During the year there has been little activity in the
matter of buildings and improvements, owing to the lack
of funds. A new patrol house was erected in the Sixth
Police District, at the southwest corner of Columbia and
Delta avenues. It is a handsome structure, up to date in
every particular, with extra accommodations for horses for
the mounted service in that portion of the city.

The erection of a new station -and -patrol house in the
Third Police District has occupied the attention of the Board
during the past year, and some progjress has been made. It
was originally intended to erect a patrol house, but during
the year it was decided to erect a combined station -and -
patrol house on the lot purchased last year. Plans and
specifications have been prepared, and proposals invited for
the work, but the amount originally appropriated was not
sufficient to erect the two houses.. By an appropriation for
1902 sufficient funds were secured, and the contract will be
let and the work pushed to an early completion. The cost
of the new building, including the lot, will be in round
numbers $18,000.

There is a pressing necessity for a new station-and-patrol
house in the Second Police District, mention of which has
been made in the annual reports of my predecessors. The
old station house in the Second Police District has been in
use for over thirty years, and although deemed fully adequate
to the demands of the service at the time of its erection, it
is now almost totally unfit for the proper care of prisoners.
Situated in the most populous of the business districts of the
city, a large number of arrests are taken there, and at times



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Non-Partisan Board of Police Commissioners 513

the capacity of the house is tested. In addition to this, the
lower floor has been used for years as a lodging-house for the
unfortunates found roaming in the streets at night, without
homes, and from a sanitary standpoint it should be located
in a more healthful quarter of the city, on a site better
adapted for police purposes.

The patrol house in the Second District is an old frame
building, absolutely unfit for a patrol house, and for which
the city is paying renl sufficient to pay the interest on the
money required for the construction of a new house. By
the erection of the new building in the Third Police District
the old station house on Bremen street will be abandoned,
and I would recommend that during the coming year steps
be taken for the sale of the Second and Third District
houses, and the proceeds applied to the purchase of a lot
and the erection of a new station-and-patrol house in the
Second Police District.

Morals and Discipline.

Taken as a body, there has been a gradual improvement
in the morals of the department. The rules and regulations
have been generally adhered to by the rank and file, with a
few individual exceptions, and the Board has not been slow
to investigate and sustain well - defined charges brought
to its attention, and to administer punishment fitting the
ofiFense.

The discipline, has been very good, considering the
number of men and their surroundings, and the privileges
granted them. Unlike soldiers kept in a garrison, who are
compelled daily to observe a certain routine of military,
camp, and garrison duties, and when off duty are confined



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514 President's Report



in barracks, with no privilege of leaving the post without
the permission of the commanding officer, the policemen is
on active duty eight hours and off sixteen hours of the
twenty -four, and during the time off active duty he is
privileged to go at will to any place within the city limits ;
and, no matter what the temptation or his surroundings, he
reports for duty promptly and follows up the routine again
for eight hours. They know that they are answerable to
the Board for their conduct while off as well as on duty, and
it is very rarely that they are found to have degraded the
department by misbehavior. With a large number of police-
men, the duties of their positions are taken up as a life
business, by means of which they gain their own and their
families' support, and instead of degrading they manifest a
desire to add to the respectability of their positions by good
conduct at all times and places. It would be strange if in a
body of men of like size a few black sheep were not found,
who simply regard the position as a place of convenience
and revenue for the time being, little caring for the good
of the department or of themselves. But of this class it
may be safely said that there are very few in the depart-
ment. As a body the officers are quick to respond to all
calls, whether on or off active duty, and to this fact alone
may be ascribed the good name and popularity of the
Cincinnati Police Department.

In the last annual report mention was made of the
tendency of officers to contract debts, and to borrow money,
in some cases at exorbitant interest. The cases were so
aggravated that a rule was adopted that officers found guilty
of borrowing money from a certain class of citizens would
be dismissed from the force, if charges were filed and sus-
tained against them. Notwithstanding this rule, ten officers



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Non-Partisan Board of Police Commissioners 515

were arraigned before the Board on charges of "Failing to
pay just debts," of which five were sustained, two not sus-
tained, two withdrawn, and one dismissed without prejudice.
In some of the cases money was borrowed on chattel mort-
gages, on which a very high rate of interest was charged.
In adjusting the claims, notice was given the creditors that
hereafter only a legal rate of interest would be recognized.
The fact that there is a rule of the Board which compels all
officers to pay any debts contracted while in the service
renders it an easy matter for officers to get credit, and it is
the abuse of this rule by tradesmen that has been of so
much annoyance to the Board. However, taken as a body,
the Police Department of Cincinnati compares very favor-
ably with any similar department in the country.

PoucE Pensions.

It was pointed out in the annual report of my predecessor
in this office that the danger-line was being reached in the
pension department, and that proper precautions against a
deplorable end to an admirably conceived provision for the
care of our veteran officers should be promptly taken. When
the present police department was organized a very large
percentage of its members were about the same age. They
have grown old together, and naturally will retire together,
so to speak. Herein lies the danger which has been spoken
of. For the purpose of crystallizing the issue and clearly
presenting the matter, some interesting figures prepared by
my predecessor as chairman of the pension fund committee
are herewith given. The first is a tabulated satement show-
ing the number of members of the department, their ages,
and the number of years served by each of them.



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616



President's Report



AGKS AND LENGTH OF SERVICE OF MEMBERS.























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Non-Partisan Board of Police Commissioners 517

This statement reveals the alarming fact that over half
of the force is over forty years of age. Between that mark
and fifty years there are 220, or 41 %; over fifty years there
are 95, or 16 % of the whole ; between thirty and forty there
are 181, or 36%; only 3%, or 18, are below thirty years of
age. The pension law provides that when an oflScer has
reached the age of fifty years and has served fifteen years
he shall be eligible for retirement. There are now, as
previously stated, 95 members who have attained the first
stage of eligibility and 80 who have attained both. From
this flows the natural query: What will be the condition
of the force five or ten years hence ? Replying, it is stated
that in five years fifty additional members will have passed
into the first stage of eligibility by reaching the prescribed
limit of fifty years, making a total of 145. Of this number
27 will have reached the second stage of eligibility, making
a total of 107 in that department.

At the close of the past year — 1901 — the average age of
the members of the force was forty-two years three months
and four days, and the average length of service eleven years
four months and fourteen days. Owing to the appointment
of a number of young patrolmen, the average is higher in
point of age but eight months and three weeks over the
corresponding year of 1900. At this rate the entire force
would reach the average age of fifty years in 191 2.

Without desiring to appear as an alarmist, it may be said
that the condition at the end of the ten-year period will
practically demand a fresh recrpiting of the department, it
being conceded that the present membership will remain
practically unchanged. The point to all of this is, How
are the members who are to be retired in that time to be
supported ? Later on it will be shown that there has been