Claud Lovat Fraser.

Nurse Lovechild's legacy : being a mighty fine collection of the most noble, memorable and veracious nursery rhymes online

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ONE SHILLING NET



COLLECTION OF




35*



'*'/," J <>'< +!>*



CHILDREN'S BOOK



LIBRARY OF THE
UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORN



Nurse LovechilcTs Legacy

BEING
A MIGHTY FINE COLLECTION

OF

| THE MOST NOBLE, MEMORABLE |
AND VERACIOUS

[NURSERY RHYMESl

Embellished by C. Lovat Fraser
for the Poetry Bookshop




THIRD THOUSAND



PRINTED FOR The Poetry Bookshop,

35 DEVONSHIRE STREET

THEOBALDS ROAD

LONDON

W.C.

1919



THIS COLLECTION MAS BEEN
COMPILED PROM XVIHth
AMD EARLYlXIXth CENTURY
<-HAPi





CONTENTS.



No. PAE

INDUCTION - 5

I. HOW FAR IS IT TO BABYLON? - 7

II. RIDE A COCK HORSE - - 8

III. SONG . . 9

IV. HUSH-A-BYE, BABY 10

V. LITTLE JACK HORNER
VI. LITTLE MISS MUFFET
VII. JACK AND JILL -
VIII. CROSS-PATCH

IX. DIRGE ....

X. THERE WAS A LITTLE MAN - 6

XI. THERE WAS AN OLD WOMAN - 7

XII.-I SAW A SHIP
XIII.-THERE WAS AN OLD MAN
X1V.-I WON'T BE MY FATHER'S JACK
XV - SING A SONG FOR SIXPENCE
XVI.-DING-DONG-BELL
XVII. GRANDPA'S SONG - 3

XVIII.-LITTLE TOMMY TUCKER - 4

XIX.-SBE-SAW, MARGERY DAW - 5

XX. GREAT A, LITTLE a - - .6

XXI.-SEE-SAW, SCARADOWN - - a 7

XXII.-HEY, DIDDLE DIDDLB - - a8



No. PAOB
XXIII. JACK SPRAT 29
XXIV. COCK-A-DOODLE-DOO - - 30
XXV. THERE WAS AN OLD MAN - 31
XXVI. SIMPLE SIMON 3*
XXVIL TELL-TALE. TIT - 33
XXVIII. ONE, TWO. THREE - - 34
XXIX. OH! MY KITTEN - 35
XXX. PATTY-CAKE - - 36
XXXL THIS LITTLE PIG - - 37
XXXII.-THERE WAS A MAN - - 38
XXXIII.-HARK! HARK! - - 39
XXXIV. BAA ! BAA ! BLACK SHEEP - 4 o
XXXV. ROBIN AND RICHARD- - 41
XXXVI. THERE WERE TWO BLACK-
BIRDS 4 a

XXXVII. THE KING OF SPAIN - 43

XXXVIII. WE'RE THREE BRETHREN- 44

XXXIX. DICKOKY. DICKORY, DOCK - 4S

XL. I HAD A LITTLE PONY - - 4*

XLL PUSSY CAT. PUSSY CAT - - 47

XLII.-BABY. BABY BUNTING - - 48

XLHI.-BELL HORSES 49

XLIV. SUKY, YOU SHALL MARRY ME 50

XLV. JOHN STOWE S SONG - - 51

XLVL ALL OF A ROW - . - S2

XLVIL THERE WAS AN OLD WOM\N 53

XLV1II. AS LITTLE JENNY WREN - 54

XLIX. MILK BELOW - - Si

L.-OLD MOTHER HUBBARD - - S 6

LI. THE HERALD'S SONG - - 57

LI I. MISTRESS MARY - - 58

LIIL NOW WHAT DO YOU THINK - 59

LI V. I'LL TELL YOU A STORY - 60



Printed by John R. Roberts. 14 Qerkenweli Green. E.C. 1.



INDUCTION.



Here's A, B, and C,

D, E, F, and G,

H, I, J, K, L, M, N, O, P, Q,

R, S, T, and U,

W, X, Y, and Z.




And here's the child's dad,
Who is sagacious and discerning,
And knows this is the fount of learning.



I.



How many miles to BABYLON?

Threescore and ten.
Can I get there by candle-lig-ht ?

Aye, and back again.




II.

Ride a cock-horse

To Banbury Cross,
To see a fine lady

Upon a white horse,
With ringfs on her fingers

And bells on her toes;
And she shall have music

Wherever she goes.





III.

SONG TO BE SUNG ON A
HIGH WIND.

ARTHUR o' BOWER has broken his

band :

He comes roaring- up the land.
King o* Scots with all his power,
Can't stop ARTHUR o' THE BOWER.





IV.

Hush-a-bye, Baby, on the tree-top;
When the wind blows the cradle will

rock ;
When the wind ceases the cradle will

fall-
Down will come Baby, and cradle,

and all.





V.

Little JACK HORNER

Sat in a corner,
Eating a Christmas Pie.

He put in his thumb,

And pulHed out a plum,
Saying, " What a good boy am I I"





VI.

Little Miss MurFET

Sat on a tuffet,
Eating her curds and whey ;

There came a big spider

And sat down beside her,
And frightened Miss MUFFET away.





VII.

JACK and JILL

Went up the hill
To fetch a pail of water ;

JACK fell down

And broke his crown,
And JILL came tumbling after.
. Then up JACK got,

And home did trot
As fast as he could caper;

And went to bed

To mend his head
With vinegar and brown paper.





VIII.

CROSS PATCH, draw the latch,
Sit by the fire and spin;

Take a cup and drink it up,
Then call your neighbours in.




14




IX.
A DIRGE.

Little BETTY WINKLE, she had a pig
It was a little pig, not very big;
When he was alive he lived in clover,
But now he's dead, and that's alfover.
JOHNNY WINKLE, he
Sat down and cried ;
BETTY WINKLE, she
Laid down and died ;
So that was the end
Of one, two, and three
JOHNNY WINKLE, he,
BETTY WINKLE, she,
And Piggy-Wiggy.





X.

There was a little man,
And he had a little gun,
And his bullets were made
Of lead, lead, lead.
He shot JOHN SPRIG
Through the middle of his
And knocked it off
His head, head, head.




16




XL

There was an old woman

Who lived in a shoe,
She had so many children

She knew not what to do.
So she gave them some broth

Without any bread,
And whipped them all soundly,

And sent them to bed.




K




XII.

I saw a ship a-sailing-,
A-sailing on the sea ;

And,, oh! it was all laden
With pretty things for me !




18




XIII.

There was an old man,
And he had a calf

And that's half.
He took him out of the stall,
And put him on the wall

And that's all'!





XIV.

I won't be my father's JACK,
I won't be my father's JILL,,
I will be the fiddler's wife,
And have music when I will.
T'other little tune,
T'other little tune,
Prithee, love, play me
T'other little tune.





XV.

Sing a song of sixpence,

Pocket full of rye;
Four-and-twenty blackbirds

Baked in a pie.
When the pie was opened,

The birds began to sing
Wasn't it a dainty dish

To set before a King?
The King was in his counting-house,

A-counting of his money;
The Queen was in her parlour,

Eating bread and honey;
The maid was in the garden,

A-hanging out the clothes
Then came a little blackbird,

And snapped off her nose;
But then came a JENNY WREN,
And popped it on again.





XVI.

Ding-dong-bell,

Pussy's in the well.

Who put her in?

Little JOHNNY GREEN.

What a naughty boy was that

To drown poor pussy-cat,

Who never did any harm,

And killed the mice in his father's barrr.





XVII.
GRANDPA'S SONG.

Oh ! cruel was the press-gang

That took my love from me ;
Oh ! cruel was the little ship

That took him out to sea;
And cruel was the splinter-board

That took away his leg :
Now he is forced to fiddle-scrape^

And I am forced to beg.




XVIII.

Little TOMMY TUCKER

Sings for his supper.
What shall he eat?

White bread and butter.
How shall he cut it

Without e'er a knife?
How will he be married

Without e'er a wife?





XIX.

See-saw, MARGERY DAW,

JACKY shall have a new master ;
JACKY must have but a penny a day,

Because he can't work any faster.





XX.

Great A, little a,

Bouncing B
The cat's in the cupboard,.

And she can't see me.




26




XXI.

Sec-saw, Scaradown,
Which is the way to London Town?
One foot up and one foot down
That is the way to London Town.




27




XXII.

Hey, diddle, diddle !

The cat and the fiddle
The cow jumped over the moon ;

The little dog laugh 'd

To see such craft,
And the dish ran away with the spoon.



28




XXIII.

JACK SPRAT could eat no fat,
His wife could eat no lean,

And so betwixt Ithem both,
They licked the platter clean.




29




XXIV.

Cock-a-doodle-doo !

My dame has lost her shoe;
My master's lost his fiddle stick

And knows not what to do.





XXV.

There was an old man

In a velvet coat
He kissed a maid,

And gave her a groat;
The groat was crack 'd,

And would not go
41 Ah. old n*an, would you serve me so'




3




XXVI.

Simple SIMON met a pieman,

Going to the Fair :
Said Simple SIMON to the pieman,,

" Let me taste your ware."

Says the pieman unto SIMON,
" First give me a penny."

Says Simple SIMON to the pieman,
" I have not got any."

Now Simple SIMON went a-fishing,

For to catch a whale ;
But all the water he had got

Was in his mother's pail.





XXVII.

Tell-tale, tit,

Your tongue shall be slit,
And every dog in the Town

Shall have a little bit.




33




XXVIII.

One, two, three,
Four and five

I caught a hare alive;
Six, seven, eight,
Nine and ten

let him go again.




34




XXIX.

O my kitten, a kitten,

And O my kitten, my deary;

Such a sweet pap as this,

There is not far nor neary :

There we go up, up, up

Here we go down, down, down

Here we go backwards and forwards

And here we go round, round, round.




35




XXX.

Patty -cake, patty-cake,

Baker's man,
Bake me a cake

As fast as you can.
Prick it an prick it,

And mark it with a T,
And put it in the oven

For* JACKY and me.





XXXI.

This little pig went to market,
This little pig stayed at home,
This little pig had roast meat,
This little pig had none;
This little pig went to the barn-door,
And cried "WEEK ! WEEK !" for more.




37




XXXII.

There was a man of Thessaly,

And he was wond'rous wise :
He jumped into a quick-set hedge,

And scratched out both his eyes.
And when he saw his eyes were out,

With all his might and main,
He jumped into another hedge,

And scratched them in again.





XXXIII.

Hark ! Hark ! the dogs do bark !

The beggars are coming to Town :
Some in rags, and some in jags,

And some in velvet gowns.




39




XXXIV.

" Baa ! baa ! black sheep,

Have you any wool? "
" Yes, marry, have I,

Three bag's full;
One for the Master,

One for the Dame,
And one for the little boy,

Who cries in the lane."




40




XXXV.
ROBIN and RICHARD

Were two pretty men :
They lay in bed

Till the clock struck ten.
Then up starts ROBIN

And looks at the sky,
" Oh ! Brother RICHARD,

The sun's very high ;
You go before

With 4jie bottle and bag,
And I will come after

On little JACK NAG."





XXXVI.

There were two blackbirds

Sat upon a hill
The one named JACK,

The other named JILL.
Fly away, JACK,

Fly away, JILL;
Come again, JACK,

Come again, JILL.





XXXVII.

The King of Spain, with thrice

ten thousand men,
Marched up the hill and then

march 'd down agaim.




43




XXXVIII.

" We're three brethren out of Spain,
Come to court your daughter JANE."
" My daughter JANE, she is too young,
She has no skill in a flattering tongue. "
" Be she young, or be she old,
It's for her gold she must be sold :
So fare you well, my lady gay,
We must return another dav. "



44




XXXIX.

Dickory, Dickory Dock
The mouse ran up the dock;
The clock struck one,
The mouse ran down
Dickory, Dickory, Dock.



45




XL.

I had a little Pony,

His name was DAPPLE-GREY :
I lent him to a lady

To ride a mile away.
She whipped him, she lashed him,

She rode him through the mire;
I'll never lend my nag again

For anv ladv's hire.





XLI.

4t Pussy cat, pussy cat,

Where have you been? "
" I've been to London

To see the Queen."
" Pussy cat, pussy cat,

What did you there? "
44 I frightened a little mouse

Uuder the chair."




47




XLII.

BABY, BABY BUNTING,
Thy father's gone a-hunting
He's gone to fetch a rabbit skia,
To wrap my BABY BUNTING in.




XLIII.

Bell horses, bell horses,
What time of day?

One o'clock, two o'clock,
Three and away.





XLIV.

SUKY, you shall be my wife

And I'll tell you why :
I have gx>t a little pig,

And you have g-ot a sty ;
I have got a dun cow,

And you can make good cheese
SUKY, will you have me?

Say " Yes," if you please.




5




XLV.
JOHN STOWE'S SONG.

Si'TTOX for g-ood mutton,
CHEAM it is for beef,
MITCHAM for a pretty girl,
And CROVDON for a thief.





XLVI.

All of a row,
Bend the bow
Shot at a pigeon
And killed a crow.



5 2




XLVII.

There was an old woman went up

in a basket

Seventy times as high as the moon;
What she did there, I could not

but ask it,

For in her hand she carried a broom.
" Old woman, old woman,

old woman," said I,
"^Whither, oh whither, oh whither

so high? "

" To sweep the cobwebs from the sky,
And I shall be back again by-and by."



53




XLVIII.

As little JENNY WREN

Was sitting- by the shed,
She waggled with her tail,

And she nodded with her head.
She waggled with her tail,

And she nodded with her head.
As little JEN XV WREN

Was sitting- by the shed.




54




XLIX.
MILK BELOW.

Rain, frost, or snow, or hot or cold r

I travel up and down ;
The cream and milk you buy of me

Is best in all the Town.
For custards, puddings, or for tea
There's none like those you buy of me.




ITO *



55




L.

Old MOTHER HUBBARD
Went to the cupboard,

To get her poor dog a bone;
But when she got there,
The cupboard was bare

And so the poor dog had none.





LI.



THE HERALD'S SONG.



The Lion and the Unicorn

Were fighting for the Crown :
The Lion beat the Unicorn

All around the Town.
.Some gave them white bread,

And some gave them brown ;
Some gave them plum cake,

And sent them out of Town.




57




LII.

" MISTRESS MARY,
Quite contrary,
How does your garden grow?*

" With silver bells

And cockle shells,

And pretty maids, all in row. "





LIII.

Now, what do you think

Of little JACK JINGLE?
Before he was married

He used to live single ;
But after he married

(To alter his life),
He left off living single

And lived with his wife.




59




LIV.

PI1 tell you a story

About JACK-A-NORY I

And now my story's begun.
I'll tell you another,
About JACK and is brother :

And now my story is done.



60



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Online LibraryClaud Lovat FraserNurse Lovechild's legacy : being a mighty fine collection of the most noble, memorable and veracious nursery rhymes → online text (page 1 of 1)