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BERKELEY

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WORKS ISSUED BY



Cl)e ^aftlugt ^orietg.



REPORTS
ON THE DISCOVEEY OF PERU.



NO. XL VII



REPORTS



DISCOVERY OF PERU



i.

REPORT OF FRANCISCO DE XERES, SECRETARY TO FRANCISCO PIZARRO.

II.

REPORT OF MIGUEL DE ASTETE ON THE EXPEDITION
TO PACHACAMAC.

III.

LETTER OF HERNANDO PIZARRO TO THE ROYAL AUDIENCE OF
SANTO DOMINGO.

IV.

REPORT OF PEDRO SANCHO ON THE PARTITION OF THE
RANSOM OF ATAHUALLPA.



TRANSLATED AND EDITED,

JSJSitlj Notes anil an Bntroouction,



CLEMENTS R. MARKHAM, C.B.



BURT FRANKLIN, PUBLISHER
NEW YORK, NEW YORK






ORIGINALLY PUBLISHED BY THE HAKLUYT SOCIETY



REPRINTED BY PERMISSION



Published by LENOX HILL Pub. & Dist. Co. (Burt Franklin)
235 East 44th St., New York, N.Y. 10017
Reprinted: 1970
Printed in the U.S.A.

S.B.N.: 8337-22271

Library of Congress Card Catalog No.: 70-134711

Burt Franklin: The Hakluyt Society First Series 47






COUNCIL



THE HAKLUYT SOCIETY.



The Right Hon. Sib DAVID DUNDAS, F.R.G.S., President
Admiral C. R. DRINKWATER BETHDNE, C.B., F.R.O.S,



R.O.8. J



• Vice-Presidents.
Majob-Gen. Sir HENRY C. RAWLINSON, K.C.B., Pres.1

Rev. GEORGE P. BADGER, F.R.G.S.

J. BARROW, Esq., F.R.S., F.R.G.S.

Rear-admiral COLLINSON, C.B., F.R.G.S.

General C. FOX, F.R.G.S.

W. E. FRERE, Esq., F.R.G.S.

Captain J. G. GOODENOUGH, R.N., F.R.G.S.

CHARLES GREY, Esq., F.R.G.S.

EGERTON VERNON HARCOURT, Esq., F.R.G.S.

JOHN WINTER JONES, Esq., F.S.A.

R. H. MAJOR, Esq.,F.S.A., Sec.RG.S.

Sir W. STIRLING MAXWELL, Bart., F.R.G.8.

Sir CHARLES NICHOLSON, Bart., D.C.L., F.R.G.S.

Vice-Admiral ERASMUS OMMANNEY, C.B., F.R.G.S.

Captain SHERARD OSBORN, R.N., C.B., F.R.G.S.

The Lobd STANLEY of Aldebley.

The Hon. FREDERICK WALPOLE, M.P., F.R.G.S.

CLEMENTS R. MARKHAM, C.B., F.S.A., Sec.R.G.S., Honorary Secbetary.



6-728



CONTENTS,



WITH THE



ITINERARIES OF FRANCISCO & HERNANDO PIZARRO.



TAOK

Introduction - xi



Itinerary of Francisco Pizarro, in the Account uf

Xeres.

1524. Nov. 14. Pizarro first sailed from Panama - - 3

Sufferings at Port Famine - - - ib.
Pizarro at Chuchama - - -4

Almagro's first voyage ... n.

Second expedition of Pizarro and Almagro - 5
Pizarro at the river San Juan. Voyage of the

Pilot Ruiz - - - 6

Pizarro reaches San Mateo and Atacames - 7

Pizarro and his companions on the Isle of Gallo - 8

1526 - - Pizarro reaches the coast of Peru - 9

1527 - - Pizarro goes to Spain - - - 11

1529. July 20. Capitulation between Pizarro and Queen Juaua - ib.

1530. Jan. - Pizarro sails from Spain - - - 12

1531. ,, - Pizarro sails from Panama - ib.

The expedition reaches the Isle of Puna - 13

Arrival at Tumbez - - - - 16

1532. May 16. Departure from Tumbez - - - 19

,, 18. At a village among the hills - - - 20
,, 24. Encamp at Puechio, on the river Tuiicai ami (or

Chira) .... u.

,, ,, Sea port of Payta discovered - - - 21



Vlll CONTENTS,

1532. May 24. Cruelty to chiefs of Almotaxe and Lachira - 22

,, ., Founding of San Miguel, at Tacgarara - - 23

Sep. 24. Departure from San Miguel - - - 25

,, 27. In the valley of Piura ... fa

Oct. 7. At Pabor, in the Piura valley - - 26

,, ,, Expedition of Soto to Caxas and Huancabamba - ib.

,, 8. At Zaran in the Piura valley - - - 27

,, 16. Return of Soto. Account of Caxas. Embassy

from Atahuallpa ... ib.

,, 17-19. Crossing the desert of Sechura - - 31

„ 20-24. At Copiz. At Motux (Motupe) - - ib.

,, 28. Hernando Pizarro swims across river at Cinto - 33

Nov. 4, 5, 6. Marching across coast valleys - - 35

,, 10. Commence the ascent of the Cordilleras from La

Ramada - - - - 37

,, 15. Arrive at Cassamarca - - - 44

,, ,, Interview of H. Pizarro and Soto with Ata-
huallpa - - - 48

,, 16. Seizure and imprisonment of Atahuallpa - 55

Arms of the Ynca army - - - 60

Palace of Atahuallpa near Cassamarca - - 61

TheYncas - - - - 62

Great Ransom offered by Atahuallpa - - 65

The Pachacamac oracle - - - 67

1533. Feb. - Arrival of Almagro - - - 69

,, 5. Three Spaniards sent to Cuzco - - 72

Jan. 5. Expedition of Hernando Pizarro - - 71



Itinerary of Hernando Pizarro, in the Report of

ASTETE.

1533. Jan. 5. Left Cassamarca. Dined at Ychoca - - 74

,, 6. Huancasanga - - - - 75

,, 7. Guamachuco .... ib.

„ 8. Tambo - - - - - 76

,, 9-13. Andainarca .... ib.

,, 14. Totopamba .... ib.



1533. Jan,


, 15.


(Toronto -


»i


1G.


Piga


,,


21.


Huaras


,,


22.


Sucaracoay


n


24.


Pachicoto


it


25.


Marcara -


,,


26.


Huariconga


n


27.


Pormunca


11


30.


Huaman-niayu


Feb


. 1.


H uara


ii


2.


Llachu





3.


Suculacumbi


ii


5.


Pachacamac


Mai


'. 3.


Huara


,,


4.


Ayaranga


ii


5.


Aillon


,,


7.


Caxatambo


,,


9.


Diu


ii


11.


Pumpu


,,


14.


Cochamaroa


ii


15.

11


Tarma

Yanamarca
Xauxa


,,


20.


Departed from Xauxa


,,


26.


Tambo


ii


27.


Tumsucancha


ii


28.


Huanuco (Gnaneso)


Api


. 1.


Piscomarea


ii


2.


Huari


M


3.

11


Guacango
Huacacaniba


.,


4.


Piscobamha


ii


7.


Agoa


,,


8.


Conchuco


ii


9.


Andamarca


ii


10.


Pombo


»i


25.


Return to Cafsamarca



AND ITINERARIES. IX



77
ib.
78
ib.
79
79
ib.
ib.
80
ib.
ib.
81
ib.
85
ib.
ib.
ib.
86
ib.
87
ib.
88
ib.
90
ib.
91
ib.
ib.
ib.
92
ib.
ib.
ib.
ib.
93
ib.
ib.



X CONTENTS AND ITINERARY.

1533. May 3. Melting of the gold and silver - - 94

Amount of the ransom - - - 95

Prices of provisions - - - - 98

Golden ornaments - - - - 99

Accusations against Atahuallpa - - ib.

Murder of Atahuallpa ... 102

Appearance of a comet ... 106

Return of Spaniards with gold - - 107

1534. July 3. Return of the author to Spain - - 109



Letter of Hernando Pizarro.

Address to the Royal Audience - - - - 113

March to Cassamarca ..... H.

Interview with Atahuallpa - - - - 115

Approach of Atahuallpa - - - - - 117
Capture of Atahuallpa - - - - -118

Advance to Guamachuco - - - 120

March 4 o Pachacamac - 121

Account of Pachacamac - - - 123

March to Xauxa - - - - - 125

Return to Cassamarca - - - - - 126

Account of the treasure - - - - - ib.



Report on the Distribution of the Ransom of Atahu-
allpa, certified by the Notary Pedro Sancho - 131



INTRODUCTION.



Francisco de Xeres, the Secretary of Pizarro, wrote
his account of the early days of the conquest of
Peru, on the spot, by order of his master. He sailed
from San Lucar, with Pizarro, in January 1530, was
with the conqueror in his voyage, in his march along
the Peruvian coast and across the Andes, and was
an eye-witness of the events at Cassamarca, down to
the murder of the Ynca Atahuallpa. He returned
to Seville on July 3rd, 1534, after an absence of four
years and a half, with the first instalments of gold.
His friends lived at Seville, and I gather from Argote
de Molina 1 that he came of a respectable family set-
tled at Ubeda ; but nothing is known of himself
personally, beyond what can be deduced from his
narrative.

The narrative of Xeres appears to have been
printed at Seville in 1534, the year of his return,
but this first edition is extremely scarce. The second
edition, which was very carelessly printed, appeared
at Salamanca in 1547, and is also very rare. The

1 Nobleza de Andalusia (Scvilla, 1588), p. 66. Argote de Mo-
lina gives the arms of the Xeres family. Vert, in base waves of
(he sea azure and argent, on them a tower argent and fastened to
If a boat with its oar or. On a bordure gules eight St. Andrew' 's
'.rotates or.



Xll INTRODUCTION.

third, and best known Spanish edition, was published
at Madrid, in the collection of Don Andres Gonzalez
Barcia, 2 in 1749. The work w r as translated into
Italian by a native of Tudela, named Domingo de
Gaztelu, who was Secretary to Lope de Soria, Am-
bassador to Venice for Charles V, and published at
Venice in 1535. A second edition of the Italian
version was published at Venice, in the collection of
Bamusio, 8 in 1556. Purchas gives a very brief
notice of it, in his Pilgrimes ; 4 and Ticknor mentions
the work in his history of Spanish literature. 8 It is
much quoted by Kobertson, Prescott, and Helps, in
their accounts of the conquest of Peru. A careful
French version was published at Paris, by M. Ter-
naux Compans, 6 in his series of works on Spanish
America, in 1837 ; but no complete English transla-
tion has hitherto been made.

As the account of an intelligent and observant
eye-witness, the story told by Francisco de Xeres,
of the most stirring episode in the wonderful history
of Spanish conquests, is exceedingly interesting.
Some portions of the story, here and there, are told
in more detail by Herrera and other compilers, but,
in reading their versions, we miss the feeling that
the author was an actor in the deeds he narrates ;

2 " Historiadores Primitivos de las Indias Occident ales," iii, p.
179. 3 Ramusio, iii, pp. 378-98.

* Purchas, Pilgrimes, iv, pp. 1491-94.

5 Ticknor, i, p. 521.

6 "Voyages, relations et mimoires originaux pour servir a Vhistoire
de la decouverte de VAme'rique" (Paris, 1837). H. Ternaux
Compans.



INTRODUCTION. Xlll

and thus, in Xeres, there is a freshness and reality
which no other published account of the conquest
can impart. Xeres himself relates the proceedings
of the Governor Francisco Pizarro. But he has
given much increased value to his work, by embody-
ing in it the report by Miguel Astete, another eye-
witness, of the expedition of Hernando Pizarro, to
the famous temple of Pachacamac. This remarkable
journey of Hernando in quest of gold, undertaken
by a mere handful of men into the heart of an un-
known land, is as attractive to the imagination as
the incredible audacity of Francisco's enterprise.
Xeres and Astete were both eye-witnesses, and their
detailed narratives combine to record the incidents
of two of the most surprising marches in the history
of Spanish discovery.

The letter of Hernando Pizarro to the Royal
Audience of Santo Domingo, 7 which follows the nar-
rative of Xeres, was written when that ruthless con-
queror was on his way to Spain, with the king's
share of the spoils. It goes over exactly the same
ground as the Reports of Xeres and Astete, it is
peculiarly valuable as containing the observations of
the man of highest rank in the expedition who could
write, and the slight variations between the accounts
of Xeres and Pizarro, in relating the same incidents,
are particularly interesting. One very odious pe-
culiarity of Hernando Pizarro was, that he habitually

7 In the " Historia General" of Oviedo, cap. xv, lib. 43. Re-
printed in the " Vidas de Espanoles celebres, por Don Manuel
Josef Quintana" (Paris, 1845), p. 180.



XIV INTRODUCTION.

tortured the Indians when he wished to obtain in-
formation from them. Yet on the three occasions
on which he mentions having applied the torture, in
this letter, he was told lies. One would have
thought that so acute an observer would have dis-
covered that this was a very inefficient method of
conducting the operations of an Intelligence Depart-
ment. The fourth document in this volume is the
Report of Pedro Sancho on the distribution of the
ransom of Atahuallpa ; 8 in which he gives the
amounts received by each of the conquerors.

Hernando Pizarro and Miguel de Astete give us
the first account of the temple of Pachacamac on
the Peruvian coast, which was afterwards described
by Cieza de Leon and Garcilasso de la Vega, and
the real significance of which is not fully understood,
and has been a good deal exaggerated. The subject
is one which may appropriately be discussed in an
Introduction to the narratives of Hernando Pizarro
and Astete ; and the following remarks will perhaps
invest them with some additional interest.

The famous temple on the Pacific coast has usually
been supposed to have been the only temple to the
Supreme Being in Peru ; and it has even been sug-
gested that, as such, it is older than the time of the
Yncas, and that they adopted this worship from
another people. Mr. Prescott 9 says that no temple

8 From the inedited work of Francisco Lopez de Caravantes.
It is reprinted in the "Vidas do Espanoles celebres, por Don Manuel
Josef Quintana" (Paris, 1845;, p. 185.

9 Prescott, i, p. 85.



INTRODUCTION. XV

was raised to Pachacamac, the Creator of the World,
save one only which took its name from the Deity
Himself; that it existed before the country came
under the sway of the Yncas, and was a resort of
pilgrims from remote parts of the land ; and that
these circumstances suggest the idea that the wor-
ship of this Great Spirit did not originate with the
Peruvian Princes. Mr. Helps 1 also says that a temple
to Pachacamac existed before the time of the Yncas,
and that they artfully coDnected this Deity with
their own religion, making out that the Sun was his
father, and thus strengthening themselves by alliance
with this primaeval Deity. Rivero adopts the same
view, namely that the Gods Con and Pachaca-
mac were early deities, whose temple was on the
sea-coast, and that the Yncas cunningly adopted
their worship, saying that these gods were sons of
the Sun. 2 There is no adequate authority for these
theories, and they seem to have arisen from a mis-
apprehension of the story as told by early writers.
The inhabitants of the Peruvian coast, called

1 Helps, hi, p. 498. The name of Con, given by Mr. Helps,
from Las Casas, as the father of Pachacamac, has originated in
some blunder among the Spanish writers. It is not an Ynca
word at all, and the legend concerning this Con has no connection
whatever with any Ynca people. See also Gomara, Hist, de Las
Indias, cap. cxxii. The prefix Con is found in the names applied
to sacred things by the coast people, and it lingered still longer
in the valleys of Huarochiri. Its meaning is now lost, but it be-
longed to the coast language. Thus there was a god in Huaro-
chiri called Coniraya, and the general name of all small stone
idols in Huarochiri was Conopa. See Avila MS.

2 Antiguedades Pernanas, p. 144.



XVI INTRODUCTION.

Yuncas by their Ynca conquerors, were an entirely
distinct race from the people of the Andes, with a
language differing both in its vocabulary and gram-
matical construction. After long and fierce wars
they were conquered by the Yncas, their language
was superseded by Quichua, many were sent as colo-
nists into the interior, Ynca colonists settled on the
coast, and the nationality of the Yuncas was de-
stroyed Very little can now be learnt respecting
them. The coast valleys were densely peopled, as is
shown by the fact of ruined towns being always
found on the verge of the desert, so as not to en-
croach on the cultivatable area. They had brought
the art of irrigation to a high state of perfection, and
they adorned the walls of their buildings with richly
coloured paintings. We have no dictionary of their
language, but we have a grammar and vocabulary
by Carrera, 3 and a few specimens of one of its dialects
preserved by Bishop Ore. 4 Of the nature of their
religion we know still less. Avila has recorded
some curious traditions, 5 and it would seem, from
the proceedings of Arriaga, the extirpator of idola-
try, that they were, much addicted to sorcery and
fortune- telling. 6 Their gods were made to give

5 Arte de la lengua de los voiles del Obispado de Truxillo ; por
Don Fernando de la Carrera (Lima, 1644).

* The Mochica spoken once in the valleys of Huarcu (Cafiete),
Runahuanac (Lunahuana), and Chincha. " Rituale seu Manuale
Peruanum; joor Ludovivum Hieronymum Orerium" (Neapoli, 1607).

5 In his narrative of the errors, false gods, and other diabolical
rites of the Indians of Huarochiri. MS. in the Biblioteca Nacional
at Madrid, B. 35.

6 " Extirpation de la idolatria do los Indios del Peru ; por Pedro



INTRODUCTION. XV11

out oracles, and the shrines became rich and im-
portant, in proportion to the credit they attained in
forecasting events. Thus, there was a famous oracle
in the valley, thence called Rimac, or "the Speaker",
by the Ynca conquerors ; and a still more renowned
one was the fish-god in the city, afterwards called by
the Yncas Pachacamac, to which pilgrims resorted
from all parts of the coast. But this fish-god was
not Pachacamac, nor was the word Pachacamac
known to the people of the coast before they were
conquered by the Yncas. It is an Ynca word, and
is wholly foreign to, and unconnected with, the coast
language. The priests of the fish-god, it would seem,
became famous as fortune-tellers, ; their shrine was
resorted to by pilgrims from distant valleys, and a
large city grew up around it, on the margin of the
sea, and of the rich vale of Lurin. The name of
the deity has not been preserved, but it certainly
was not Pachacamac.

In course of time the coast valleys *were conquered
by the Yncas, who gave them Quichua names. Nasca,
Pisco, Runahuanac, Pachacamac, Pimac, Huaman,
etc., are all pure Quichua names. It seems clear,
therefore, that, when the Ynca Garcilasso tells us
that the coast lord Cuismancu had adopted the wor-
ship of Pachacamac from the Yncas, and had built a
temple to him, in which however he placed the fish
and fox-gods of the Yuncas, that his ideas were COn-



Jt^e de Arriaga" (Lima, 1621). The old fanatic says that he
punished sixty-three wizards, in the coast valleys.



XV111 INTRODUCTION.

fused. 7 He assumed that there was a worship of
Pachacamac because the place had received that
name ; but the fish and fox-gods are a clear proof that
a Supreme Being was not worshipped there. In short
the word Pachacamac had nothing to do with the re-
ligion of the coast people. The worship of the Supreme
Being, under the names of Pachacamac 8 (Crea tor of the
World) and Pachayachachic 9 (Teacher of the World),
formed a prominent feature in the religion of the
Yncas. The names occur, and have the first place, in
nearly all the ceremonial prayers of the Yncas given
by Molina. 1 When the Yncas conquered the coast-
city of the fish-god, they assigned to it the name of
Pachacamac, for some reason that has not been pre-
served, possibly on account of its size and importance.
The Yncas frequently named places after their
deities or sacred festivals. Thus, besides this Pacha-
camac, we have another at Tumebamba, and Vilca-
nota, Fz7ca-pampa, Vilca-c\inc&, Huaca-ch&ca, Huaca-
puncu, jRayTm'-pampa, and many more. 2

7 Comm. Real., Pt. I, lib. vi, cap. 30. Herrera is still more in
the dark. He says that the Yncas believed in a Creator of all
things called Viracocha, to whom they built a very rich temple
called Pachiamac. Dec. v, lib. iv, cap. 4.

8 From Pacha (the world) and camac the participle of Camani
(I create). See O. de la Vega, I, lib. ii, cap. 22 ; and lib. v,
cap. 12.

9 From Pacha (the world) and Yachachic, participle of Yacha-
chini (I teach). See Acosta, lib. v, cap. 12 ; G. de la Vega, Pt. i,
lib. v, cap. 18 ; and Molina MS.

1 Relacion de las fabulas y ritos de los Yncas, hecha por Chris-
toval de Molina. MS. at Madrid, B. 35.

* Vilca is a sacred place, Iluaca an analogous but more com-
prehensive term, and Baymi the great festival of the Sun.



INTRODUCTION. XIX

But they never built any temple to Pachacamac,
md there never was one to that deity, except at
Cuzco. On the summit of the lofty hill, overhang-
ing the town of Pachacamac, they erected a temple
of the Sun, which was approached by three wide
terraces. Bivero states 3 that the temple of the Sun
was not on the top of the hill, but Cieza de Leon 4 dis-
tinctly asserts that the loftiest part was set aside as a
temple of the Sun. Astete also says that, adjoining
the " mosque" (that is, the temple of the fish-god),
there was a house of the Sun, situated on a hill, with
five surrounding walls. Hernando Pizarro tells us
that the store-rooms of gold and the convents of
women were at the foot of the hill, and that the
chief priest and the building containing the fish-god
(devil, as he calls it) were on the terrace platform
above. Higher up there were two other wide terraces,
and the temple of the Sun was on the summit.

The Yncas built a temple of the Sun on the hill
top ; though, in accordance with their usual policy,
they allowed the wooden fish idol to remain in its
shrine below ; which they even condescended to
consult as an oracle, from conciliatory motives. But
its importance waned after the Ynca conquest, the
pilgrims fell off in numbers, and the town began to
lose its citizens. When Hernando Pizarro arrived
in 1533, the greater part of the outer wall had
fallen, and there were many houses in rums. Here
is an additional proof that this was not a temple to

3 Antiq. Per., p. 201.

4 Sec my translation, p. 203.



XX INTRODUCTION.

the Ynca deity Pachacamac, " the only temple in
Peru dedicated to the Supreme Being". If such
had been the case, its importance would have in-
creased, and not diminished, after the conquest by
the Yncas, in whose prayers the Creator ever had
the first place. There is no reason for supposing
that pilgrims ever resorted to the shrine of the fish-
god from any part of the empire of the Yncas, except
the coast valleys ; and the diversity of skulls alleged
to have been found among the ruins is sufficiently
accounted for by the presence of mitimaes or colonists,
and by the marches of Ynca armies. 8

The conclusions I have formed are, that the wor-
ship of Pachacamac, the Creator of the World, was
a part of the Ynca religious belief ; and that it was
wholly unconnected with the coast Indians ; that
there never was any temple to Pachacamac at the
place on the coast to which the Yncas gave that
name, for some reason now forgotten ; that the
natives worshipped a fish-god there under a name
now lost, which became famous as an oracle, and
attracted pilgrims ; and that, when the Yncas con-
quered the place, they raised a temple to the Sun,
on the summit of the hill commanding the city of
the fish-god, whence the glorious luminary could be
seen to descend behind the distant horizon, and
bathe the ocean in floods of light. These conclusions
are supported by the writings of Garci lasso de la
Vega and Cieza de Leon, and by the report of
Astete ; and they agree with all that is recorded of

5 Sec my translation of Cieza de Leon. Note, p. 252.



INTRODUCTION. XXI

the religions belief of the Yncas, and with the few-
facts that can be gathered, from various sources,
touching the Yuncas or coast Indians.

The present Editor examined the ruins of Pacha-
camac, in much detail, in 1853 and again in 1854,
and made a plan of them. He again visited them
on the 19th of February, 1860, accompanied by an
Irish chieftain and two Englishmen. We ascended
the terraces on horseback to the platform of the
temple of the Sun ; where the old Catholic chieftain
broke out in praise of the Yncas. We reminded him
of their heresy, but he repeated, as he drained his
sherry flask, " Here is to the Yncas ! God rest their
souls in peace !" We rode back through the narrow
streets to Lurin, and, in memory of the event, one
of our party wrote the following lines, contrasting
the Catholic Hernando Pizarro of the sixteenth, with
the Catholic Hibernian of the nineteenth century.

The sunlight glanced from helm and spear

Upon the terraced height,
And awe-struck crowds had gathered round

Beneath the temple bright.

High on the ruined altar stone

The iron conqueror stood,
And o'er the broken idol held

Outstretch'd the holy rood.

And as he preach'd God's truth, his brow

Darker and darker grew,
And the people feared the bloodstain' d man,

And they feared his bloodstain'd crew.

For his speech was cruel and fierce to them,
And hard to understand,



XX11 INTRODUCTION.

As he cursed the children of the Sun,
The rulers of the land.

# # # #

Full many a year is passed and gone
Since that strange scene befell,

Of many a tale of blood and woe
The silent ruins tell.

We stood upon the temple wall,
And fierce the sunlight beat

Upon the sand that compassed round
The city at our feet.

The ruin'd terrace gardens told
Of splendour passed away,

And bleaching in the Sun, the bones
Of Priest and Warrior lay.

Then one who held the ancient creed
Of him who preached of yore,

And bowed before the self-same sign,
The cross the conqueror bore.

Raised high the wine cup in his hand,
" We'll drink the noble dead !

The Princely Rulers of the land !
God rest their souls," he said.


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Online LibraryClements R. (Clements Robert) MarkhamReports on the discovery of Peru → online text (page 1 of 13)