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Erskine
North Carolina
Appalachian State 1
Georgia State
DukeO

South Florida
Virginia
Maryland 1
Madison
South Florida
Pennsylvania
UCLA 2





Erskine was one of the tougher games enroute to
the playoffs; however, a hard earned victory only
gave more reason for celebration.





Although Clemson scored prolifically, it was the
fine goalie play of Denis Carrington (1) which
provided the Tigers with shutout after shutout.








The leader of the Tiger offensive onslaught was
their All-American and leading scorer Henry
Abadi (9).


















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Depth and teamwork were earmarks of this years
squad as Coach Ibrahim often substituted his
bench liberally.








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Clemson's overpowering offense
continually kept the pressure on
opposing goalies.





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Coach I. M. Ibrahim in seven short years had
turned Clemson into a national power in soccer
and well deserved coach of the year honors in
the ACC as well as national recognition.







The outstanding efforts of Clyde Browne (11)
gained him the distinction of ACC player of the
year for the second straight season.



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Outmaneuvering the opponent's defense, often
to the amusement of spectators, became a
specialty of the Tiger offense.




f »>»4 > ■*>



Activities




TAPS



i



It's hard to say what TAPS 74
really was. To most, it was a book
that came out in April. To others, it
was seventeen people assigned to sum-
marize a year of Clemson— the contro-
versies, the work, the play, the
victories, the losses, the people.
To us, it was a group of friends,
close friends, who all had a common
goal and the desire to see nine thou-
sand other students enjoy the end
project of that goal. We stayed up
until the wee hours of the morning with
impending deadhnes, missed
shots, lost prints, unwritten
copy, irate students, unsympathetic




TONY WATSON
PHOTOGRAPHER



KATIIY DAVIS
PR01ESSI0NAL.S



JEAN DORAN
STUDENT ASSOCIATIONS/MILITARY



HOAGY OSTLING
PHOTOGRAPHER



TOM HUFF
ADMINISTRATION



LAURIE FLOYD
ADS



ANN SMITH
DESIGNER



ALLEN HENRY
EDITOR



CAROL MEINCKE

STUDENT GOVERNMENT

CO-DESIGNER



lub presidents, and insufficient
funds. Emotions became so tense and
strained that a staffer yelled at a
best friend as if he were an enemy.
Ten minutes later, they were friends
again. Bad times were mixed with the
good, hectic times with those of leisure.
TAPS '74 was a variety-a homogeneous
collection of heterogenous people . . .
people who laughed, cried, and even
cut up together. Ideals were different,
principles varied, personalities
clashed, but in the end, everything
came together into a darn fine
yearbook.




SCOTT MYERS
GREEKS



ERIC DUNHAM
CO-HEAD PHOTOGRAPHER



MOLLY JOHNSON
ACTIVITIES/HONORARIES

PAT PETTY
CLASSES



JOHN BETHEA
PHOTOGRAPHER

ED BEAMAN
CO-HEAD PHOTOGRAPHER



DON COLEY
SPORTS

CHERYL HUDGINS
WHO'S WHO/BUSINESS MANAGER



/!:^:/yi^










^-^s^^^

X)"'



TAPS
Junior
Staff



We've done so much . . . "An
uncommon amount of yelling, cursing,
screaming and an infinite number of
various other horrors." . . . Allen
who? He's editor of the Tiger, I think.
. . . Check the darkroom . . . Anyone
know what's going on? We've got to
get our ***** together . . .
Listening and learning . . . Please
remain after the meeting . . . Who
cropped that picture with two butts?
. . . Copy sheets . . . What's that?
Cut the jive . . . Who is buying the
beer? I don't drink. You are on the
staff aren't you? . . . What is a
lowercase print and upper case print?
I don't understand . . . Who cleans up
the darkroom? Dark what? Mass con-
fusion . . . Hand me the scale . . .
o . . . cropper. Deadline next Monday
. . . All this and much more, but the
book was worth it.






Robert Floyd
Van Armstrong
Susan Knoeble
Howell Hunter
Jack Rash
Marty Price
Junior Skeleton
Meg Latimer
Steve Morgan
Steve Altman
Lynn Nawrocki
Curt Howard
Lynn Prosser
Lesley Moss
Lisa Haeringer



Mary Beth Huff
Jeannie Hood
Roland Skinner
Jan Johnson
Belinda Hammel
Barbara Martin
Laura Petit
Jim Tutcn
Ken Kemon
Becky Elvington
Carlton Carr
Watson Johnson
Paula Schaefer
Mary E. O'Connor




The Tiger does not exist to promote

beer busts and dances
or to be a twelve-page issue of campus bulletins.
The Tiger is not meant to paint

Clemson in sunny pastels
without pointing out that some things need changing.
The Tiger

attempts



The Tiger




BEN GREEN
CIRCULATION MANAGER



ILXRRIET HUTTO
BUSINESS MANAGER



NANCY JACOBS QUALLS
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF



KERRY CAPPS
SPORTS EDITOR



PHIL FOSS
ADVERTISING MANAGER



to entertain (occasionally
to shock

to anger

to inform
Sometimes

it succeeds.





EARLGATLIN
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR



PAGE LEE HITE KEITH BRINKLEY

PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR OFFICE MANAGER



GINNY MANNING MARILYN WALSER THOMPSON

FEATURES EDITOR ASSOCIATE EDITOR



DEBBIE GRAHAM
NEWS EDITOR



Tiger Senior Staff




ger Junior Staff



The junior staff contains a
limited reservoir of overextended
resources— people with high pain
threshold and a willingness to be
used. They can't get together to have
a picture made, but somehow they
manage to get the work done.




WSBF



WSBF Radio is more than what meets
the ear . . . The Senior Staff: Thirteen
students wori<ing hard, sometimes in
different directions, but unified in
the common goal of serving the univer-
sity community with the broadcast
medium. Reaching out to find out what
you, the students of Clemson University,
want your station to represent in the
forms of entertainment and informa-
tional service. The rewards are satis-
faction with station progress and per-
sonal achievement.

The "station" is an insti-
tution witl




^AM t AMfHhLL
PROGRAM DIRECTOR



KR K SPIIZ
ENGINEERING DIRECTOR



DENNY LANGSTON
ATC COORDINATOR



RONALD WATT
CONTROL ROOM ENGINEER



CHARLIE BEBKO
MUSIC MANAGER



•,3\W!<?i^''vf.''1(^J:;



senior staffers looked and asked ques-
tions-how and why things were the way
they were. Then, they applied their own
ideas and another year was under way.
The mammoth task of prepearing WSBF
for the increased responsibilities of
extended coverage from the antenna
height increase, put an added burden on
already iieavy laden duties.

Tiie business staff concerned
itseh" with promoting communications
with the administration and other stu-



dent organizations.





DAVID STANTON
SEWS MANAGER



DAVE POLK TOM HILL

TECHNICAL MANAGER TRANSMITTER ENGINEER



NEENA COOK
OFFICE MANAGER



MIKEPURCELL
BUSINESS DIRECTOR



BRENDA HORNE

TRAFFIC AND

CONTINUITY MANAGER



♦ # ♦ # ♦



WSBF Senior Staff



Bookkeeping had to be straiglitened
out; old equipment had to be replaced;
new and ever more sophisticated equip-
ment had to be ordered. The program
staff had the ever present problem of
determining how to balance programming
in order to please the most students
without sacrificing the interests of
the minority. A format had to be devel-
oped in order to give direction and
variety to the entertainment programs.
More local news coverage developed.
New taped programs were produced.
Music was more carefully screened.
New students were trained to fill up




gaps in the air schedule to increase
li\o air time and more professional
picsentation through actual experience.

Tiie engineering staff had the
awesome responsibility of insuring
that the technological advances required
by the new antenna project were
realized in the form of a wide assort-
ment of electronic doodads. Repairs
were always needed on the older
equipment. New engineers had to be
recruited and trained. The purpose
was to build a technical base of equip-
ment that would ser\'e the imiversity
for many years to come.




WSBF Junior Staff



A major portion of tlie progress of
WSBF this year was largely due to the
dedicated efforts of the junior staff.
These individuals indicated that they
were willing to take direction and
assumed the responsibility of the day
to day details involved in the opera-
tion of a radio station. The future
years will be determined by the experi-
ence the junior staff gathers during
its service. Junior staffers perform




a wide variety of functions sucli as
ninety percent of all live air time,
keeping the studios clean, filing
records, typing logs, and reading
news. Engineering junior staffers
learn the complicated circuitry and
trouble shoot equipment problems. New
program staffers spend many hours pre-
paring themselves for clearance for air
time in hopes that they may also be
added to the hst of announcers.



Kevin Black


David Matthews


Michael Cook


Derrick Merck


Roy DeBolt


Gus Reese


Cindy Hall


Rick Rogers


David Hendricks


Sam Smith


Chuck Kizer


Susan Truett


Rick Lindsay


Phil Tuck


James Loftis


W. H. Walker


Bob Mackney


John Xenakis


Al Mason


George Yeremian




The 1973-1974 version of the
Central Dance Association Senior Staf
is new challenges, opportunities,
excitement, and a lot of hard work.
For nine students who were really into
music this was the year that was. Al-
though we faced numerous obstacles,
we were able to overcome them. Those
who made the year possible were as
follows: Dr. Herbert Busching, Chief
Weeden, Mr. Powell, Coach Smith,
Wilson, Cecil, Mike, John Trice, Sally
Don, Shay, Doug, Gary, Becky, and



Central Dance Association



for apathy in this crow



you won't find it.




GARY HARMAN
PUBLIC RELATIONS



BECKY ANDERS
CORRESPONDING SECRETARY



SHAY STONEY
SECRETARY-TREASURER




DOUG LEE
E PRESIDENT



MIKE MULLEN

ALTERNUS



JOHN REYNOLDS
PRESIDENT



DON BOOTH
FLOOR MANAGER



JOHN TRICE
UNION COORDINATOR



SALLY LANGFORD
PUBLICITY



CDA Concerts




CDA Junior Staff



The 1973-1974 Junior Staff of CDA
is composed of forty students who have
the ambition and desire to participate
in something which other students will
appreciate. Make no mistake about it,
they are the ones who do all the thank-
less jobs that have to be done. Even
when faced with unbearable pressure,
the Junior Staff gives more determi-
nation and dedication than one can
believe possible. It is their labors
that make the productions a success for
the Clemson students. Looking back at
the year, it really was a lot of fun in
spite of all the hard work and grief
which we faced.




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K



Chuck g^r^^^,



Mike Blackwell


Donna McRobert


Steve Murray


Ken Barnett


John Vissage


David D> clics


Beth Yarboro


Chuck Medberi)


David Hogsed


Tommy Page


Rich Maldeis


Rip Home


Doug Thompkins


J. Gamble


Ed Garris


Ralph Paylor


Bob Driggers


Marie Bethea


Hall Goode


Jamie Inglehart


Frankie Carson


Rob Roberts


Teresa Powell


Tom Nolen


Cathy Davis


Scott Ewing


Miss\ Gunn


Fred Shuler


Nanc\' Chastain


Mike Stuck


Blair Berkland


Steve Droll


Ralph Leyh


Stan Mcllvain




The purpose of the Clemson Univer-
sity Student Union is to provide social,
cultural, and recreational programs
for members of the University commu-
nity. The Student Union programs serve
as a part of the total educational
growth of students and as a laboratory
for leadership training in social
responsibility and democratic leader-
ship and provides an opportunity for
students to develop skills in human
relations.

The Student Union Governing Board
^i 1 4- T T * is the overseeing body of

OtU-QGllt UniOll the Student Union. It sets
policy, picks the committee chair-




people and officers of tlie Union and
lias ultimate authority over the work-
ings of the Union. The Governing Board
consists of the following: The President
and two Vice Presidents of the Student
Union, the Vice President of the Stu-
dent Body, two members at large and one
representative from each of the follow-
ing bodies: IFC, Panhellenic Council,
married students, and the Alumni Associ-
ation, two faculty members, the Student
Union Director and Program Director.
The Student Union Program Board
does the actual planning and coordinating
of activities through frequent meetings.
The Program Board Consists of the Pres-








Student Union



ident of the Student Union, the two
Vice Presidents, and the committee
chairperson from each of the follow-
in 14 committees: Contemporary
Entertainment, Jam Sessions, Short
Courses, Films, Outdoor Recreation.
Cultural, Games and Recreation, Hot
Line, Coffee House, Clemson student
Volunteer Programs, Travel, Interna-
tional Students Association. Special
Events, and Publicity and Public
Relations.




The backbone of the Student Union
is the program committees. The commit-
tees are comprised of student volun-
teers. They actually carry out the
programs from initial planning, to
promoting, to supervising the activi-
ties, to evaluation and follow-up. These
people are the true guts of the Student
Union.

The Student Union is considered to
be comprised of all students attending
Clemson University.




Student Union





Rhett Atkins, Pres.
Denny Avery
Lynn Barrett
Bigi Beckwith
Terry Bell
David Bethany
Rick Boyleston
Alan Cade
Louis Carannante
Stuart Crowley
Malcolm Curry
Cathy Curtan
Doug Davenport
Herbie Eason
George Esher
Dan Gee
Helen Goldman
Terry Gray
Robin Herdman
Douglas Hipp, V-Pres.
Duane Hipp
Gary Hoffman
Bobbie Holland
Joyce Kelley
Steve King
Bill Kossler
Paul Lewis
Kevin Lowden
Steve Meadows
Joel Miller
Mike MuUen
("..iry Nelson
Andy Piatt
Rick Reed
Cantey Richardson
Perry Richardson
Stacey Rollins
Mesgun Sebhatu
Udia Singh
Alvin Tayloi
Bert Taylor
Bill Taylor
Mary Pat Thomas
John Trice
Clint Wetmore
Debbie Wheat
Bruce Whiteside
Laurence Wienges
David Williamson
Dennis Wilson



The University Chorus is a formal
Concert ensemble dedicated to the study
and performance of a wide variety of
choral music. Emphasis is placed on
developing a high degree of excellence
both musically and from the standpoint
of expressive communication with audi-
ences. The Chorus presented a number
of concerts on campus and on tour
this year, as well as joint concerts



The University Chorus



with the Concert
Band.




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J. Hopkins


K. Rendall


B. Hudson


N. Rhodes


L. Huff


R. Richards


P. HuU


B. Richardson


P. Hutcheson


C. Rogers


B. Jones


J. Saye


P. Kozlick


L. Seal


F. Kunz


M. Shuler


D. Lewis


D. Smith


L. Lovelace


C. Sowell


M. McGinn


W. Squires


L. Metzner


G. Thompson


J. Miller


K. Thompson


A. Moody


D. Towe


M. Patrick


J. Tyrrell


S. Pianza


G. Wellmann


C. Price


S. Whitley


C. Quick


D. Williams


B. Ray


N. Wooten


C. Read


S. White




Tlie Concert Band of Clemson
University devotes its time to the
study and performance of concert lit-
erature, interspersed liberally with
selections from Broadway musicals,
marches and novelties. Frequent campus
and tour appearances have given this
organization a reputation as one of the
finest concert bands in the Southeast.
The instrumentation is selected to
provide a well-balanced concert
ensemble. The eighty member group is
formed at the beginning of the spring
rryt /"^ j_ T> J semester and continues its

Ine Concert oand a tmtes through to the



spring commencement.




Concert Band




Tiger Band




The Tiger Band, the official
marciiing band of Clemson University,
is widely acclaimed for its excellence
in musical performance and precision
drill. It is composed of some 140
male and female students, who wear
their brilliant orange coats and black
fur busbies proudly as they perform
stirring school songs, marches, and
show tunes for entliusiastic audiences



at football games, pep rallies, basket-
ball games and parades, at home and
away. Members of the Tiger Band come
from all schools and colleges in the
university, including freshmen as well
as fourth and fifth year students. A
smaller, select "Pep Band," made up
of Tiger Band members, plays for all
home basketball games.





F. Adams


C, l-lemmg


B. Lowe


M. Shell


J. Allen


M. Foster


D. Lucas


N. Simmons


K. Anderson


R. Foster


J. Lucas


L. Sloan


B. Antley


C. Freeman


W. Mattis


J.Smith


J. AsweU


T. Furqueron


M. McComb


S. Smith


J. Atkins


H. Gambrell


B. Mc-Cuen


K. Snelgrove


C. Bagnal


L. Garrison


D. McKee


M. Snelling


W. Barbrey


J. Gepford


N. McLeod


R. Snoddy


V. Barton


P. Gibson


B. McMahan


N. Sowers


M. Baxley


R. Glenn


J. McMilUan


G. Spires


W. Benton


M. Good


P. Meadows


T. Stapleton


B. Berkland


M. Gregory


J. Mftz


D. Stesdley


D. Berry


J. Hamer


E. MitcheU


P. Steehnan


J. Bogaidus


K. Hanley


T. Moore


K. Still


H. Bouknight


S. Harbin


J. Mozley


L. Stoddard


K. Bouknight


M. Harrison


G. Murray


M. Stokes


J. Bowers


F. Haynes


J. Dates


J. Stoney


L. Breads


F. Henderson


C. Owens


R. Stubbs


K, Brown


T. Henderson


M. Owens


C. Suratt


L. Burn


W. Hickman


R. Parker


G. Thomas


R. Button


F. Holbrook


E. Parker


J. Thrailkill


A. Cade


B. Holden


E. Parler


G. Tumbhn


R. Carroll


M. Hooper


J. Paysinger


S. Turner


T. Carson


B. Huff


D, Peeples


F. Ulmer


V. Cheatham


T. Hunter


E. Pennington


D. Walsh


A. Cohen


J. Irwm


R. Pittman


V. Wann


C. Coleman


D. Johnson


S. Planchock


W. Ware


T. Coleman


L. Johnston


W. Pod mo re


R. Warner


G. Collins


G. Kellum


R. Pritchard


K. Weatherly


J. Cone


C. Kilgus


D. PuUen


L. Wehunt


R. Copelan


J. Killinger


M. Raines


R. Westbury


J. Corcoran


S. King


C. Rathbun


K. White


K. Corley


T. King


P. Rau


D. WiUet


M. Crawford


T. Law


C. Renner


B. Williams


T. Crowson


N. Lee


J. Rich man


R. Willis


J. Darity


T. Lendon


L. Riley


F. Wood


R. Denton


J. Lipsey


J. Robertson


W. Wood


S. Dorn


J. London


D. Rochester


L. Woods


J. Duke


M. Lord


M. Roof


H. Worthy


F. EUenberg


S. Love


L. Sanders


R. Young


A. Finley


S. Love






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Clemson Players Presents . . .




Greeks




Panhellenic Council



What a year for Clemson Panhellenic Society!
Each Sorority, different and unique, worked to
strengthen the Greek way of life. Being a Greek
meant working not only with one's own sisters
but also with all the Greek sisters. Activities
included such events as making banners for foot-
ball games, holding a reception for Jeanne
Dixon and sponsoring the annual Halloween
Party. For the work Panhellenic did, it received
third place for this year at the National
Convention. In the fall, Panhellenic sponsored
its biggest project-rush. Panhellenic estabUsh-
ed the rules, scheduled the parties, and
introduced the rushees to a new way of life.





This year's rush gave evidence tliat the Greek
way of life continues to grow at Clemson. In the
reception of new pledges, Panhellenic bonds were
strengthened and the Greek way of hfe continued
onward.



President -Martha B. Brunnemer
Vice-President-Julie C. Johnson
Secretary-Susan M. Day
Treasurer - M. Ann Todd




idenfjReali-3'' *n p*p-r '



Chi Omega





m




President— Connie A. Feasel
Vice President— Lisa J. Krisher
Secretary— Anne L. Lewis
Treasurer— Lucy R. Gorena
Pledge Treasurer-Robbie Jo Hance
Personnel Chairman— Debbie A. Beauregard



identification on page 570



Chi
Omega




No one but a Clii Omega looks forward

So much to August and so little to May

No one else can put into one year

All the

Happy moments, surprise parties
service projects, Tigerama
and sorority sing practices,
study hours, extracurricular
activities, and understanding
that a Chi Omega can.

A Chi Omega is a fascinating person-
You can criticize one,
but you can't discourage her.
You can get a higher honor,
but you can't make her quit.

A Chi Omega sister is the one person

who walks in

when the rest of the world
walks out . . .




ACROSS, TOP LEFT: Chi O's at Sorority smg. ACROSS, TOP
RIGHT: Late for class again! ACROSS, BOTTOM LEFT: June's
heading for the pool. ACROSS, BOTTOM RIGHT: Wendy shows
off her legs. LEFT: Chi O Saloon girls welcome rushees. TOP
RIGHT: "ReaUy Cindy! Five aces!" MIDDLE RIGHT: "Hey V
you're out of line." BOTTOM RIGHT: Robbi Jo makes herself
comfortable.



Delta Delta Delta





^v^




President-Donna M. Richardson
Vice-President— Melody Baker
Secretary— Elyse G. Henry
Treasurer— April Baker




Delta
Delta
Delta



So you and I are almost to the
end, and what has it been from start
to finish?

It's been a year of laughter:
Six A. M. breakfast in bed from our
pledges and Homecoming with 800 hot-
dogs to sell.

Along with the laughter were
tears-Happy tears over candlelights-
Sad tears as we say goodbye to old
sisters.

But, most of all, it's been a
year of love— love found in giving a
party for the children at Whitten
Village or love developed in the
strength of our unity.

So, we can view the past with-
out regrets and the future with pride
and confidence in the abihty within
us.






ACROSS, TOP: Concentration brings a mood of seriousness to sorority sing. ACROSS, TOP
LEFT: Cathy seems to enjoy PhyUis' joke. ACROSS, BOTTOM LEFT: Sisters compare
pictures. ACROSS, MIDDLE: Teresa is the only one to pose for her picture. LEFT: Martha
shows off her legs to her date. BELOW LEFT: The sisters show off their costumes for the 20's
skit. BELOW: Rhetta does her act.




Kappa Alpha Theta






President— Becky A. McClelland
Vice President~A. Cheryl Harkey
Vice President Pledge-L. Kathy Garrison
Secretary -Shirley G. Canaday
Treasurer— Pam G. Lester



Kappa
Alpha
Theta



Thetas are alive and growing. k

After two years on the Clemson campus, '
Theta has expanded to fifty-one
members. The year was much fun and
work. We'U never forget the kid-
nappings for breakfast, the spaghetti
dinners, intramural games, the
Jockettes, and most of all the sister-
hood shared by everyone. In sister-
hood, we learned to accept each
other as individuals even through
practical jokes and major crises
but most of all througli friendship
. . . Theta love.




ACROSS. LEFT: Arden and Wendy take a break from rushing to get some food. ACROSS, TOP:
Wendy did a messy job sliaving. ACROSS, MIDDLE: Lynda taking a late breakfast. ACROSS,
MIDDLE RIGHT: Belinda cliecks lier Cliristmas stocking. ACROSS, BOTTOM RIGHT: Theta's do
a dance number for the grand finale. BOTTOM LEFT: "Susan! Put some clothes on." BELOW:
Practice makes perfect for sorority sing. BOTTOM RIGHT: Santa Claus arrives on the Theta's
floor.




Kappa Kappa Gamma






President-Judy V. Bryson
First Vice-President— Susan A. Jones
Second Vice-President— Brenda F. Rice
Secretary— Susan M. Broadbent
Treasurer— Gloria G. Hash



Kappa
Kappa
Gamma



Having been established at Clemson
University in March, 1970, Kappa
Kappa Gamma has grown to be the
largest sorority on campus. Kappas
share the ideals of friendship,
service, and loyalty. In Kappa, one
will get to know many people. From
the many members, true friendships
will grow in direct proportion to
the amount one gives and cares. The
most wonderful aspect of Kappa
Kappa Gamma is that people really
care for one another. There was
always someone to share your feehngs
with-whether it was the excitement of
our spring formal, a roller skating party,
or the despair over approaching exams.
Kappa Kappa Gamma is understand-
ing and love.





ACROSS, TOP LEFT: Kappa's present their show at sorority
sing. ACROSS, TOP RIGHT: The Kappa Uio entertains.
ACROSS, BOTTOM LEFT: Another sister heads for the pool.
ACROSS, BOTTOM RIGHT: Cheryl and her backup group
perform their latest hit. LEFT: Another victim of the shaving



Online LibraryClemson UniversityTaps (Volume 1974) → online text (page 3 of 24)