College of Pharmacy of the City of New York.

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All classes of galenical preparations are taken up and their methods of preparation not only col-
lectively, but individually, are thoroughly considered. The common impurities of each and
methods for their detection, means of preservation and incompatibilities are also considered.
Particular attention is paid to the latter part of this subject, not only as regards the galenical prep-
arations, but also the various inorganic salts and newer remedies. The subject of Homoeopathic
Dispensing receives its due share of attention.

The laboratory work follows closely the plan of the lectures, the student ascertaining by appro-
priate tests the identity and purity of various compounds, and preparing many inorganic and
organic pharmaceutical preparations and salts, such as the liquors, chemical syrups, inorganic
salts, organic compounds, etc.

Ample facilities are provided for students engaged in studying pharmaceutical manufacturing
on a large scale, and for those engaged in assaying and carrying on plant analysis, etc. A properly
equipped balance room is on the laboratory floor for the use of students engaged in quantitative
work.

Pharmacy 57-58 — Dispensing Pharmacy. Recitations, i hour, laboratory
course, I hour, 3 points. Professors Diekman, Wimmer and Brown and in-
structors.

The work of the Dispensing Labotalory deals more especially with prescription difficulties,
and embraces the all-important subject of chemical, pharmaceutical and therapeutical incom-
patibilities — those which may, as well as those which frequently do occur. The continual intro-
duction of new remedies renders the subject of prescription incompatibilities a never-ending study,
and it is the aim of this department to qualify its graduates for keeping pace with discovery.

Text-book: Ruddiman, Incompatibles in Prescriptions; Diekman and Wimmer, Pharmacy
Notes.

Pharmacy 63-64 — Pharmaceutical Law and Accounting. Lectures,
Law: lectures and laboratory exercises. Accounting. 4)^ points. Lectures i}/i
hours, Laboratories ij^ hours.

This course in Commercial Pharmacy is designed to give the student a basic knowledge of the
principles that underlie the successful management of a business. Owing to a lack of knowledge



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 39

of these principles, many pharmacists have failed to achieve the degree of success to which their
professional knowlege and training entitle them.

The accounting records are the basic source of data for business management. Accordingly,
the course in commercial pharmacy will be devoted largely to the principles underlying the making
and interpretation of these records.

The course develops the subject rapidly devoting its time and emphasis to the foundational
problems of accounting. It is built up along the lines and methods of modern accounting practice.
The subject matter includes: theories of debit and credit; classification of accounts; underlying
principles of various accounting records; business papers and documents used as the basis for first
entry; simple problems of the balance sheet and income statement; single entry; controlling ac-
counts; handling sales and purchases; safeguarding the cash; consignments, and related topics.
Ample practice for students is provided. The work will, so far as possible, be related to the modern
pharmacy. Its chief problems of organization and management will be considered.

A portion of the course will be devoted to general business and pharmaceutical law.

Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence. This course is designed to familiarize the student with the
general provisions of State and Federal Laws governing the practice of pharmacy. Ordinances
and regulations having local application only will likewise be studied.

Special attention will be given to the prohibition and anti-narcotic laws and regulations.

A knowledge of these laws and regulations is essential to the proper and safe conduct of a drug
store or pharmacy.

Pharmacy 102 — Advanced Pharmacy. Lectures and recitations, i hour.
Laboratory, i hour, 3 points. Professors Diekman, Wimmer and Brown.

Members of the university class will devote the entire time between the examinations of the
college class and those of the university class to work in the pharmacy laboratory.

The theoretical part of the course is devoted to the study of the more advanced methods of
dispensing and compounding, as well as to the study of methods and processes employed in the
manufacture of pharmaceutical preparations.

The practical part embraces the compounding of prescriptions requiring advanced knowledge
and skill, and the manufacture of official preparations, such as compressed tablets, plasters, salve
mulls, pastes, pencils, sprays, inunctions and others.

Text-book: Scoville, Art of Dispensing.

Pharmacy 109-110 — Higher Pharmacy. Lectures and recitations, 3 hours.
Laboratory work 5 hours, 11 points. Professors Diekman and Wimmer and
Brown, and instructors.

The course in this department consists of a series of lectures, laboratory exercises and recitation.
The scope of this work comprises the manufacture and study of a number of the more difficult
Pharmacopoeial and National Formulary preparations, as well as of synthetic remedies. In the
manufacture of the latter class of preparations, especial emphasis will be laid upon the proper
assemblage, arrangement and use of apparatus.

The entire time assigned for work in the dispensing laboratory will be devoted to a compre-
hensive study of the subject of prescription incompatibilities. The large number of new remedies
which are constantly being employed make the work in this field attractive and valuable.

Pharmacy 111-112 — Dispensing Pharmacy. Laboratory work, 2 hours,
2 points. Professors Wimmer and Brown.

Text-books: U. S. Pharmacopoeia, pth edition; National Standard Dispensatory, latest edition;
National Formulary, 4th edition.

Pharmacy 163-164 — Higher Pharmacy. Lectures and recitations, ij^
hours. Laboratory work 7 hours 10 points. Professors Diekman, Wimmer and
Brown.

The work in this course consists of a series of lectures and practical laboratory exercises. The
manufacture and subseqi'ent analysis of flavoring extracts, cosmetics, medicated gauzes, and
other articles of like natui e, will receive the attention which this important subject merits. Proxi-
mate vegetable analysis will also be studied and carried on.



40 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

The time assigned for work in the dispensing laboratory will be devoted to the compounding
of difficult prescriptions. Pharmaceutical topics of current interest will be discussed in a series
of weekly seminars.

Text-book: U . S. Pharmacopmia, pth edition.

Pharmacy 215-216 — Advanced Pharmacy. Lectures 2 hours. Conference
}/2 hour. Laboratory work, 5 hours, 10 points. Professors Diekman, Wimmer
and Brown.

Pharmacy 217-218 — Dispensing Pharmacy. Laboratory work, i hour, i
point. Professor Wimmer.

Pharmacy 219-220 — History of Pharmacy. Lectures i hour, 2 points.
Professor Diekman.



UNIVERSITY BUSINESS COURSE

A co-operative course is offered by this College and the Department of Uni-
versity Extension, designed especially to fit men and women for managerial or
executive positions in pharmacies and other pharmaceutical establishments.
Students applying for admission to this course are expected to possess a somewhat
higher degree of intellectual maturity than that of the average high school grad-
uate, and it is specially recommended that they shall have had one or more years
of college training.

This class will pursue our regular two-year course leading to the degree of
Graduate in Pharmacy, but members will be excused from such of our work, if
any, as has been performed elsewhere. During a portion of their three free days
per week they will attend the university courses in business listed in the following
schedule. A small additional amount of work, which can be performed in the
evening, will enable them to secure a University Certificate in Business. Upon
the completion of the legal period of practical experience, they may then secure
the pharmacy license.

UNIVERSITY BUSINESS COURSE

First Year

Winter Session Spring Session

English eAi — English Composition, 3 Secretarial Correspondence 64, 3

points. points.

Psychology ei — Elements of Psychol- Psychology eii8a — ^The Psychology

ogy. 3 points. of Advertising and Selling, 3

Marketing e2i — Principles of Adver- points.

tising, 2 points. Marketing e22 — Principles of Adver-

Accounting ei — First Year Account- tising, 2 points.

ing, 2 points. Accounting e2 — First Year Account-
ing, 2 points.



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 41

Second Year

Law eb3 — Business Law, 2 points. Economics eiy — Elements of Busi-
Marketing 631 (Salesmanship), 2 ness Administration, 2 points.

points. English ei3 — Oral English, 2 points.

Marketing e25 — Practical Advertising Economics ei8 — Elements of Busi-

Writing, 2 points. ness Administration, 2 points.

Law eb4 — Business Law, 2 points. English ei4 — Oral English, 2 points.
Marketing e4 — Problems of Retail

Merchandising, 2 points.
Marketing e24a — Advertising Display,

2 points.

FEES

The College fee will be the regular fee for the College Course. The fee for
the Business Courses will be at the regular University rate of $10 a point.



SUMMER LABORATORY AND QUIZ COURSES

These courses are designed to assist students who have failed at the spring
examinations to prepare for those of the fall, and to provide instruction for
special students in the use of the microscope, in the examination of drugs and in
pharmaceutical processes.

It will thus be seen that the work is not definitely fixed, but is made sufficiently
elastic to allow it to be adapted to the special needs of individuals.



LABORATORY COURSES 1 92 5

Fees: Twenty-five Dollars for each subject.

June 8 to June 27 — Analytical Chemistry and Physics.

June 29 to July 18 — Histology and Pharmacognosy.

July 20 to August 8 — Pharmacy and Dispensing Pharmacy.



QUIZ COURSES 1925

Fees: Fifteen Dollars for each subject.

These courses will be held during the period from August 17 to September 5.
First-year students will attend on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, and second-
year students on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The schedule of hours for
each day will be as follows:

First Year Second Year

9 a. m.-io a. m. Botany 9 a. m.-io a. m. Materia Medica

10 a. m.-ii a. m. Physiology 10 a. m.-ii a. m. Toxicology

11 a. m.- I p. m. Chemistry 11 a. m.- i p. m. Pharmacy
2 p. m.- 4 p. m. Pharmacy 2 p. m.- 4 p. m. Chemistry

4 p. m.- 5 p. m. Physics 4 p. m.- 5 p. m. Dispensing Pharmacy



42 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

EVENING COURSES

These courses of instruction, as reorganized, have been largely attended.
Although they cannot be substituted for any of our regular work, leading to
degrees, they have proven of great benefit to those who cannot attend instruction
during the daytime and to those who desire to pursue special courses of study.
General educational credits are not allowed for them. They are designed for
special students as well as for members of our regular classes. Certificates will
be awarded to those who attend at least 80 per cent of all of the exercises of the
course for which they register and who, in addition, receive a satisfactory grade
in a final examination. Students may be admitted at any time at the discretion
of the instructor in charge. A registration fee of $6.00 is required of each student.
The courses are given on three evenings of each week from Monday, September
28, 1925, to Friday, April 30, 1926. Students may pursue more than one of the
courses offered during the same semester. Fees are payable in advance and are
not returnable. The following courses of instruction are offered:

Chemistry, Phr. 20-e — Pharmaceutical Qualitative Analysis, i hour
classroom and 2 hours' laboratory each week. Fee, $16 each session. Mr.
Macsata and assistant.

7:30-10:30 p. m., Friday,

Lecture, 7:30-8:20 p. m.

Laboratory, 8:30-10:30 p. m.

This course, which presupposes a knowledge of general pharmaceutical chemistry is designed
to train students in the qualitative tests for metal-ions included in the United States Pharma-
copoeia. (Conditional on the enrollment of 10 students.)

Laboratory fee, $5 per session.
Deposit for breakage, $10.

Chemistry, Phr. 21-e — Pharmaceutical Qualitative Analysis, i hour

classroom and 2 hours' laboratory work each week. Fee, $16 each session. Mr.
Macsata and assistant.

7:00-10:00 p. m., Friday.

Laboratory, 7:00-9:00 p. m.

Lecture, 9:10-10:00 p. m.

This course is a continuation of 20-e with particular reference to the U. S. P. tests for acid-ions.
(Conditional on the enrollment of 10 students.)

Laboratory fee, $5 per session.
Fee for breakage, $10.

Chemistry, Phr. 22-e — Pharmaceutical Volumetric Analysis, i hour
classroom and 2 hours' laboratory work. Fee, $16 each session. Mr. Macsata
and assistant.

7:00-10:30 p. m., Friday,

This course is designed to give training in the volumetric assays of the United States Pharma-
copoeia. (Conditional on the enrollment of 10 students.)

Laboratory fee, §5 per session.
Deposit for breakage, $10.



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 43

Chemistry, Phr. 24-e — Examination of Urine, i hour lecture and 2
hours' laboratory work. Fee, $16. Professors Hostmann and McAdams and
assistant.

7:15-10:30 p. m., Friday.

Lecture, 7:20-8:20 p. m., Friday

Laboratory, 8:30-10:30 p. m., Friday.

In this coiirse the qualitative and quantitative chemical tests of normal and pathological urine
are studied; also the preparation and standardization of the necessary reagents. (Conditional
upon the enrollment of twenty students.)

Laboratory fee, I5.
Deposit for breakage, $10.

Chemistry, Phr. 25-e — Examination of Urine, ij^ hour lecture and 2
hours' laboratory work. Fee, $16. Professors Hostmann and McAdams and
assistant.

7:30-10:00 p. m., Friday.

Lecture, 7:30-8:00 p. m., Friday.

Laboratory, 8:20-10:00 p. m., Friday.

In this course, a continuation of 24-e, the gravimetric, polariscopic, colorimetric and microscopic
examination of urine is studied. (Conditional upon the enrollment of twenty students.)

Laboratory fee, $5.
Deposit for breakage, $10.

Pharmacy, Phr. 10-e — Elementary Pharmacy, i hour lecture and 2
hours' laboratory work each week. Fee, $16 each session. Special laboratory
fee, j?5 each session. Professor Brown and assistant.

7:30-10:30 p. m., Tuesday.

This course is of value to those employed in pharmaceutical laboratories. Pharmaceutical
operations as well as dispensing practices are studied and carried out. (Conditional upon the
enrollment of ten students.)

Pharmacy, Phr. 11-e — Advanced Pharmacy, i hour lecture and 2 hours'
laboratory work each week. Fee, $16 and special laboratory fee, $8 each session.
Professor Brown and assistant.

7:30-10:30 p. m.

In the winter session instruction is given in the manufacture of the more difficult medicinal
preparations, such as the compressed tablets, medicated gauzes, ampouls, etc. During the spring
session methods of analysis for such preparations and galenicals in general are studied and carried
out. (Conditional upon the enrollment of ten students.)

Pharmacy, Phr. 12-e — Manufacturing Pharmacy. i3^ hours lectures and
I }^ hour laboratory work each week. Fee, $20 and special laboratory fee, $$
each session. Professor Wimmer and assistants.

7:30-10:30 p. m., Tuesday.

This course is of value to those desiring to prepare and place upon the market lines of specialties.
The course is elastic and designed to meet individual requirements. One may take up the study
of an entire series of preparations, or any one preparation in considerable detail. (Conditional
upon the enrollment of ten students.



44 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

Pharmacy, Phr. 14-e — Manufacture of Cosmetics and Perfumes, ij^

hours' lectures and ij^ hours' laboratory work each week. Fee, $24 and $5
special laboratory fee each session. Professor Wimmer and assistants.

7:30-10:30 p. m., Tuesday. Main lecture room, Pharmacy.

This course affords a thorough review of the entire subject of cosmetics and perfumes, their
composition and manufacture. Face lotions, hair dyes and other hair preparations, face powders
and paints, cream (greasy, non-greasy and vanishing), toothwashes and powders, etc., are studied
and certain types are manufactured. The important subject of perfumes receives the attention to
which it is entitled. (Conditional upon the enrollment of ten students.)

A summary of the lecture topics will be furnished upon request.

Microscopy, Phr. 16-e — Microanalysis of Drug Products, ij^ hours'
lecture and 2 hours' laboratory work each week. Fee, $20 each semester. Labora-
tory fee, $15 each session. Professor Ballard and assistants.

Monday — Lectures, 7:00-8:20 p. m. Laboratory, 8:30-10:30 p. m.

This course provides instruction in the identification and examination of powdered drugs, and
medicinal products amenable to microscopic examination. Satisfactory courses in botany, vege-
table histology and pharmacognosy are necessary prerequisites. (Conditional on an enrollment of
five students.)

Microscopy, Phr. 17-e — Microanalysis of Food Products, ij^ hours'
lecture and 2 hours' laboratory work each week. Fee, $20 each semester. Labora-
tory fee, $15 each session. Professor Ballard and assistants.

Monday — Lectures, 8:30-9:45 p. m. Laboratory, 7:00-8:30 p. m. and 9:45-
10:30 p. m.

This course provides instruction in the microscopic examination of foods and food products.
Satisfactory courses in botany and vegetable histology are necessary prerequisites. (Conditional
on an enrollment of five students.)

Bacteriology and Blood Analysis, Phr. 18-e — Principles and Practice of

1 3^ hours' lecture and 2 hours' laboratory work each week. Fee, $20 each session.
Professor Hart and assistants.

Monday — Lectures, 7:00-8:30 p. m. Room 42, Pharmacy.

Laboratory, 8:30-10:30 p. m.

This course includes the bacterial examination of sputum, excreta, water, air, milk and ice as
well as the micro-organisms of catsups, canned goods and fruit products. Special attention is
given to the methods of disinfection and sterilization. The major portion of the time is devoted
to the cultivation, morphology and staining of the more common pathogenic bacteria. Preparation
and microscopy of blood smears; blood counts and the quantitative chemical analysis of blood.

Laboratory fee, $10.
Deposit for breakage, $10.

OTHER OPTIONAL COURSES

In the laboratory work, apparatus and material will be furnished without
charge. All broken, lost, or injured apparatus must be either replaced, or the
expense of such injury be borne by the student.

LABORATORY COURSE IN VEGETABLE HISTOLOGY

The laboratories will be open for those desiring to do special work in microscopy.
This work will be under the direction of Professor Ballard.



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 45

CHEMICAL ANALYSIS

The Chemical Laboratory of this College is open for special courses in qualita-
tive and quantitative analysis. Students who desire to extend and perfect their
knowledge in this important branch of chemistry will have every facility for so
doing. The equipment of the laboratory offers exceptional opportunities for
advanced work. The course is designed not only for students of this College, but
for any one who wishes to study chemistry from a practical standpoint.

ADVANCED INORGANIC AND ORGANIC CHEMISTRY

With the object of enabling students who so desire to devote their entire time
to college work, the laboratory is open daily for individual instruction, the stu-
dent entering at any time during the College session, selecting such hours for
work as his time may permit. According to the needs of the individual the prep-
aration of either inorganic or organic compounds will be taken up. Subsequent-
ly the examination and analysis of the several classes of compounds may be
carried out. Special courses in commercial organic analysis, pharmaceutical
assaying and chemical vegetable analysis are also given.

PRACTICAL PHARMACY

This course is designed for both Junior and Senior students who desire to
review the subjects taught during the regular course, or for those students whose
entire time may not be occupied, and who desire an opportunity to do special
laboratory work.

The subjects of instruction will be adapted to the requirements of each individ-
ual student, and will be graded according to the proficiency he displays.

This course will also prove of great value to such students as require more
individual supervision and attention than they can obtain during their obligatory
laboratory course.

The course will embrace all pharmaceutical manipulations, from the most
simple to those of a more intricate and complex character, such as pill coating,
the manufacture of compressed tablets, tablet triturates, gelatin suppositories,
etc.

Each student will have ample opportunity to become proficient in all manipu-
lations embraced in the manufacture of the modern pharmaceutical preparations.

The pharmaceutical laboratories will be open every working day from 9 a. m.
to 3 p. m., and each student may select such hours as are most convenient to him,
the time at which he begins and the length of the time devoted to such studies
being entirely optional.



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE COLLEGE OF
PHARMACY OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK

OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES, I924-I925

President
Lewis N. Brown

Honorary President
Adolph Kenning

Vice-Presidents
Richard Timmermann Robert R. Gerstner Eli Gershonowitz

Secretary
Hugo H, Schaefer

Treasurer
George C. Diekman

Registrar
Curt P. Wimmer

Executive Board
May O'C. Davis, 1925. Harry Taub, 1926.

Henry Golueock, 1925. A. A. Philo, 1926.

John H. Hecker, 1925. Mabel Bauer, 1927.

Vivian K. Commons, 1926. Fred Lascoff, 1927.

ViTO Calcagno, 1927

Committee on Papers and Queries
C. P. Wimmer Adolph Henning John H. Hecker

Delegates to the American Pharmaceutical Association
Geo. C. Diekman C. P. Wimmer Jeannot Hostmann

Delegates to the New York State Pharmaceutical Association
Charles W. Ballard Orrin O. Bigelow Vivian K. Commons

Delegates to the New Jersey Pharmaceutical Association
Harold McAdams Charles W. Holton Harry E. Bischoff

Delegates to the Connecticut Pharmaceutical Association
Curt P. Wimmer Harold Levy Frank V. Damtoft

46



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 47

ENDOWMENTS

For ninety-five consecutive years the College of Pharmacy of the City of
New York has maintained its annual courses of instruction for the education
and training of pharmacists. That this instruction has exhibited a steady ex-
tension and improvement is clearly recorded in the successive editions of its
annual prospectus. That such a result could not have been attained by the use
of students' fees, unaided by other resources, will be readily understood by all
who have had experience in educational administration. Such assistance may
be said to have begun with the generous contribution of free instruction services
by Professors Edward R. Squibb, Charles F. Chandler and others, in the early
history of the institution, and to have continued with the services of their suc-
cessors, and the unpaid management of officers and trustees. At various times,
financial crises have been met by generous donations of money by officers and
members, and occasionally by outside friends. In some cases, as when new
quarters were to be secured, a new building was to be erected, or herbarium or
apparatus to be bought, the sums thus contributed have been large, considering
the resources of those contributing.

As indicated in the preceding pages of this Announcement, in addition to the
regular course of two years, leading to the degree of Ph.G., the College now pro-
vides a regular course of three years leading to the degree of Ph.Ch., with an
additional year of optional work, leading to the degree of B.S. in Phar.

Plans for a graduate course of two years, leading to the degree of Doctor of
Pharmacy, have been perfected by the Faculty, but cannot be carried out at the
present time for want of the necessary material resources. That the strain of
such a charge upon our material resources is very great, calling as it does for an
increased teaching force, newly equipped rooms and additional apparatus,
requires no explanatory statement.

It is not to be expected that the scanty revenue derived from the fees of the
small number of students who will pursue these advanced studies will begin to
provide the necessary means for meeting the additional expenditures. The Col-



Online LibraryCollege of Pharmacy of the City of New YorkCollege of pharmacy of the City of New York (Volume 1924/25-1930/31) → online text (page 14 of 61)