College of Pharmacy of the City of New York.

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laboratory study of types of the principal families, especially those rich in medicinal and poisonous
species.

Text-book: B-ushy, Manual of Botany.

References: Bentham and Hooker, General Planlarum; Engler and Prantl, Pflanzenfamilien.

Materia Medica 117-118 — Bacteriology. Lectures i hour, 2 points, lab-
oratory' 2}4, hours, 4J^ points. Professors Hart and Taub and instructors.

The Bacteriological Laboratory in our new building has been fully equipped, and practical
work in this important field is taken up. The general principles of the science are taught, and the
students cultivate, stain, and study the more important microorganisms. Laboratory methods
in the bacterial examination of water, air, milk, ice, sputum and excreta are given, and methods of
disinfection and sterilization are practically demonstrated.

Park and Williams, Pathogenic Micro-organisms.

Materia Medica 155-156 — Human Physiology. Text-book and Conferences

1 hour, 2 points. Miss Hopping.

This course consists of a series of discussions, based on assigned reading, occupying i hour
weekly throughout the term.
Text-book: Howell, Physiology.

MM. 205-206 — Morphology and Taxonomy of Cryptogams. Lectures 2
points, laboratory 23^ points. Professors Ballard and Hart,

This course comprises lectures, recitations and laboratory exercises in the morphology, phylo-
geny and taxonomy of the Thallophyta, Bryophyta and Pteridophyta. One or more representa-
tives of the different orders of each class and subclass will be studied in detail.

Prerequisite — Courses MM. 15, 17, 18 or equivalent courses in botany and vegetable histology.

Texts: Coulter, Barnes, Cowles, Text-Book of Botany, Vol. i; Strassburger, Text-Book of Botany.

Materia Medica 207-208 — Chemical Microscopy. Laboratory course,

2 hours, 2 points. Professor Ballard.

PHARMACY

Pharmacy 7-8 — Theory of Pharmacy (including Pharmaceutical Latin
and Arithmetic). Lectures 3 hours. Recitation i hour. Professors Diekman,
Wlmmer and Brown and instructors. 8 points.

Theory of Pharmacy

The object of this course is to teach the student to put into practice in the laboratory the prin-
ciples of pharmaceutical manipulation taught in the lecture room. While the student's work is
individual, it is carefully supervised by professors and instructors, so that errors in conception and
inaccuracies in method can be promptly corrected.

In the laboratory course the students reach a point where each is competent to prepare such
pharmaceutical preparations as are in common use.

The course is designed to present, in as brief a manner as is consistent with thoroughness, those
principles of Latin etymologj' and construction which are essential to an intelligent understanding
and use of the terminology of Pharmacy.

As the time which can be devoted to this work in the present curriculum of schools of pharmacy
is necessarily limited, only such parts of Latin grammar will be taken up as are required for the
correct use of nomenclature of the materia medica, and prescription writing.

The nomenclature of the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary will be
especially considered, and if time permits, that of the principal foreign Pharmacopoeias will be
taken up. The subject of Latin abbreviations, as used by the physician in prescription writing,
wUl be specially treated.



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 39

Text-books: U. S. Pharmacopoeia; National Formulary, 4th edition; Sturmer, Pharmaceutical
Latin; H. C. Muldoon, Pharmaceutical Latin; Sturmer, Pharmaceutical Arithmetic.

Pharmacy 9-10 — Practical Pharmacy. Laboratory course, 2 hours, 2
points. Professors Diekman, Wimmer and Brown, and instructors.

Text-book: Diekman and Wimmer, Pharmacy Laboratory Notes.

Pharmacy 11-12 — Dispensmg Pharmacy. Laboratory course, i hour,
I point. Professors Diekman and Wimmer and Brown, and instructors.

This course embraces the methods of compounding the various types of prescriptions, from
the simplest to those requiring much technical knowledge and skill. It includes theoretical in-
struction and training in manual work. The habit of neatness, and, above all, of accuracy, ac-
quired by the student is of direct and immediate advantage to him in rendering his services more
valuable to his employer.

Text-book: Diekman and Wimmer, Dispensing Laboratory Notes.

Pharmacy 55-56 — Practical Pharmacy. Lectures 2 hours, recitations, i
hour, laboratory course, 2 hours, 8 points. Professors Diekman, Wimmer and
Brown, and instructors.

The lectures of this course serve the double purpose of furnishing a theoretical basis for the
work of the laboratory and of supplementing the instruction given in the dispensing laboratory.
All classes of galenical preparations are taken up and their methods of preparation not only col-
lectively, but individually, are thoroughly considered. The common impurities of each and
methods for their detection, means of preservation and incompatibilities are also considered.
Particular attention is paid to the latter part of this subject, not only as regards the galenical prep-
arations, but also the various inorganic salts and newer remedies. The subject of Homoeopathic
Dispensing receives its due share of attention.

The laboratory work follows closely the plan of the lectures, the student ascertaining by appro-
priate tests the identity and purity of various compounds, and preparing many inorganic and
organic pharmaceutical preparationa and salts, such aa the liquors, chemical syrups, inorganic
salts, organic compounds, etc.

Ample facilities are provided for students engaged in studying pharmaceutical manufacturing
on a large scale, and for those engaged in assaying and carrying on plant analysis, etc. A properly
equipped balance room is on the laboratory floor for the use of students engaged In quantitative
work.

Pharmacy 57-58 — Dispensing Pharmacy. Recitations, i hour, laboratory
course, i hour, 3 points. Professors Diekman, Wimmer and Brown and in-
structors.

The work of the Dispensing Laboratory deals more especially with prescription difficulties,
and embraces the all-important subject of chemical, pharmaceutical and therapeutical incom-
patibilities — those which may, as well as those which frequently do occur. The continual intro-
duction of new remedies renders the subject of prescription incompatibilities a never-ending study,
and it is the aim of this department to qualify its graduates for keeping pace with discovery.

Text-books: Ruddiman, Incompatibles in Prescriptions; Diekman and Wimmer, Pharmacy
Notes,

Pharmacy 63 — Commercial Pharmacy. 2^4 points. Lectures i}/2 hours.
Laboratories i3^ hours. Professor Lascoff.

This course in Commercial Pharm'acy is designed to give the student a practical knowledge of the
basic principles that underlie the successful management of a business. Owing to a lack of knowledge
of these principles, many pharmacists have failed to achieve the degree of success to which their
professional knowledge and training entitle them.

The course consists of all the acti\'ities incidental to the opening and operation of a retail drug-
store, including the choice of location, the elements of business administration and store manage-
ment, insurance, problems of retail merchandising, including the value of discounts, banking.



40 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

principles of advertising and salesmanship, business correspondence as well as the elements of
systematic bookkeeping.

The accounting records are the basic source of data for business management. Accordingly,
the course in commercial pharmacy will be devoted largely to the principles underlying the making
and interpretation of these records.

The course develops the subject rapidly devoting its time and emphasis to the foundational
problems of accounting. It is built up along the lines and methods of modern accounting practice.
The subject matter includes: theories of debit and credit; classification of accounts; underlying
principles of various accounting records; business papers and documents used as the basis for first
entry; simple problems of the balance sheet and income statement; single entry; controlling ac-
counts; handling sales and purchases; safeguarding the cash; consignments, and related topics.
Ample practice for students is provided. The work will be related to the modern pharmacy.

A portion of the course will be devoted to general business and pharmaceutical law.

Pharmacy 64 — Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence. 2 points, ij^ hours.
Lecturer Neustaedter.

This coiu-se is designed to familiarize the student with the general provisions of State and Federal
Laws governing the practice of pharmacy. Ordinances and regulations having local application
only will likewise be studied.

Special attention will be given to the prohibition and anti-narcotic laws and regulations.

A knowledge of these laws and regulations is essential to the proper and safe conduct of a drug-
store or pharmacy.

Pharmacy 102 — Advanced Pharmacy. Lectures and recitations, i hour.
Laboratory, i hour, 3 points. Professors Diekman, Wimmer and Brown.

Members of the university class will devote the entire time between the examinations of the
college class and those of the university class to work in the pharmacy laboratory.

The theoretical part of the course is devoted to the study of the more advanced methods of
dispensing and compounding, as well as to the study of methods and processes employed in the
manufacture of pharmaceutical preparations.

The practical part embraces the compounding of prescriptions requiring advanced knowledge
and skill, and the manufacture of official preparations, such as compressed tablets, plasters, salve
mulls, pastes, pencils, sprays, inunctions and others.

Text-book: Scoville, Art of Dispensing.

Pharmacy 109-110 — Higher Pharmacy. Lectures and recitations, 3 hours.
Laboratory work 5 hours, 11 points. Professors Diekman and Wimmer and
Brown, and instructors.

The course in this department consists of a series of lectures, laboratory exercises and recitation.
The scope of this work comprises the manufacture and study of a number of the more difficult
Pharmacopceial and National FormulEiry preparations, as well as of synthetic remedies. In the
manufacture of the latter class of preparations, especial emphasis will be laid upon the proper
assemblage, arrangement and use of apparatus.

The entire time assigned for work in the dispensing laboratory will be devoted to a compre-
hensive study of the subject of prescription incompatibilities. The large number of new remedies
which are constantly being employed make the work in this field attractive and valuable.

Pharmacy 111-112 — Dispensing Pharmacy. Laboratory work, 2 hours,
2 points. Professors Wimmer and Brown.

Text-books: U. S. Pharmacopaia, gth edition; National Standard Dispensatory, latest edition;
National Formulary, 4th edition.

Pharmacy 163-164 — Higher Pharmacy. Lectures and recitations, i}4
hours. Laboratory work 7 hours, 10 points. Professors Diekman, Wimmer and
Brown,

The work in this course consists of a series of lectures and practical laboratory exercises. The



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 41

manufacture and subsequent analysis of flavoring extracts, cosmetics, medicated gauzes, and
other articles of like nature, will receive the attention which this important subject merits. Proxi-
mate vegetable analysis will also be studied and carried on.

The time assigned for work in the dispensing laboratory will be devoted to the compounding
of difficult prescriptions. Pharmaceutical topics of current interest will be discussed in a series
of weekly seminars.

Text-book: U. S. PharTnacopcBia, gth edition.



SUMMER LABORATORY AND QUIZ COURSES

These courses are designed to assist students who have failed at the spring
examinations to prepare for those of the fall, and to provide instruction for
special students in the use of the microscope, in the examination of drugs and in
pharmaceutical processes.

It will thus be seen that the work is not definitely fixed, but is made sufficiently
elastic to allow it to be adapted to the special needs of individuals.

LABOILA.TORY COURSES 1927

Fees: Twenty-five Dollars for each subject.
June 6 to June 25 — Analytical Chemistry and Physics.
June 27 to July 18 — Botany and Pharmacognosy.
July 20 to August 8 — Pharmacy and Dispensing Pharmacy.

QUIZ COURSES 1926

Fees: Fifteen Dollars for each subject.

These courses will be held during the period from August 16 to September 4.
No course will be given to a class numbering less than five students. First-
year students will attend on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, and second-
year students on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The schedule of hours for
each day will be as follows:

First Year Second Year

9 a. m.-io a. m. Botany 9 a. m.-io a. m. Materia Medica

ID a. m.-ii a. m. Physiology 10 a. m.-ll a. m. Toxicology

II a. m.- I p. m. Chemistry 11 a. m.- i p. hl Pharmacy

2 p. m.- 4 p. m. Pharmacy 2 p. m.- 4 p. m. Chemistry

4 p. m.- 5 p. m. Physics 4 p. m.- 5 p. m. Dispensing Pharmacy

E\^NING COURSES

These courses of instruction, as reorganized, have been largely attended.
Although they cannot be substituted for any of our regular work, leading to
degrees, they have proven of great benefit to those who cannot attend instruction
during the dajtime and to those who desire to pursue special courses of study.
General educational credits are not allowed for them. They are designed for
special students as well as for members of our regular classes. Certificates will
be awarded to those who attend at least 80 per cent of all of the exercises of the



42 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

course for which they register and who, in addition, receive a satisfactory grade
in a final examination. Students may be admitted at any time at the discretion
of the instructor in charge. A registration fee of $6.00 is required of each student.
The courses are given on three evenings of each week from Monday, October 4,
1926, to Friday, April 30, 1926. Students may pursue more than one of the
courses offered during the same semester. Fees are payable in advance and are
not returnable. The following courses of instruction are offered:

Chemistry, Phr. 20-e — Pharmaceutical Qualitative Analysis, i hour
classroom and 2 hours' laboratory each week. Fee, $16 each session. Mr.
Macs ATA and assistant.

7:30-10:30 p. m., Friday.

Lecture, 7:30-8:20 p. m.

Laboratory, 8:30-10:30 p. m.

This course, which presupposes a knowledge of general pharmaceutical chemistry ia designed
to train students in the qualitative tests for metal-ions included in the United States Pharma-
copoeia. (Conditional on the enrollment of 10 students.)

Laboratory fee, $5 per session.
Deposit for breakage, $10.

Chemistry, Phr. 21-e — Pharmaceutical Qualitative Analysis, i hour
classroom and 2 hours' laboratory work each week. Fee, $16 each session. Mr.
Macsata and assistant.

7:00-10:00 p. m,, Friday.

Laboratory, 7:00-9:00 p. m.

Lecture, 9:10-10:00 p. m.

This course is a continuation of 20-e with particular reference to the U. S. P. tests for acid-ions.
(Conditional on the enrollment of 10 students.)

Laboratory fee, $5 per session.
Fee for breakage, $10,

Chemistry, Phr. 22-e — Pharmaceutical Volumetric Analysis, i hour
classroom and 2 hours' laboratory work. Fee, $16 each session. Mr. Macsata
and assistant.

7:00-10:30 p. m., Friday.

This course is designed to give training in the volumetric assays of the United States Pharma-
coposia. (Conditional on the enrollment of 10 students.)

Laboratory fee, $5 per session.
Deposit for breakage, $10.

Chemistry, Phr. 24-e — Examination of Urine. 1 hour lecture and 2
hours' laboratory work. Fee, $16. Professors Hostmann and McAdaiis and
assistant.

7:15-10:30 p. m., Friday.

Lecture, 7:20-8:20 p. m., Friday.

Laboratory, 8:30-10:30 p. m., Friday.

In this course the qualitative and quantitative chemical tests of normal and pathological urine



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 43

are studied; also the preparation and standardization of the necessary reagents. (Conditional
upon the enrollment of twenty students.)

Laboratory fee, I5.
Deposit for breakage, $10.

Chemistry, Phr. 25-e — Examination of Urine, ij^ hour lecture and 2
hours' laboratory work. Fee, $16, Professors Hostmann and McAdams and
assistant.

7:30-10:00 p. m., Friday.

Lecture, 7:30-8:00 p. m., Friday.

Laboratory, 8:20-10:00 p. m., Friday.

In this course, a continuation of 24-e, the gravimetric, polariscopic, colorimetric and microscopic
examination of urine is studied. (Conditional upon the enrollment of twenty students.)

Laboratory fee, $5.
Deposit for breakage, |io.

Pharmacy, Phr. 10-e — Elementary Pharmacy, i hour lecture and 2
hours' laboratory work each week. Fee, $16 each session. Special laboratory
fee, $5 each session. Professor Brown and assistant.

7:30-10:30 p. m., Tuesday.

This course is of value to those employed in pharmaceutical laboratories. Pharmaceutical
operations as well as dispensing practices are studied and cai'ried out. (Conditional upon the
enrollment of ten students.)

Pharmacy, Phr. 11-e — Advanced Pharmacy, i hour lecture and 2 hours'
laboratory work each week. Fee, $16 and special laboratory fee, $8 each session.
Professor Brown and assistant.

7:30-10:30 p. m.

In the winter session instruction is given in the manufacture of the more difficult medicinal
preparations, such as the compressed tablets, medicated gauzes, ampouls, etc. During the spring
session methods of analysis for such preparations and galenicals in general are studied and carried
out. (Conditional upon the enrollment of ten students.)

Pharmacy, Phr. 12-e — Manufacturing Pharmacy. 1 J^ hours lectures and
1 14. hour laboratory work each week. Fee, $20 and special laboratory fee, $5
each session. Professor Wimmer and assistants.

7:30-10:30 p. m., Tuesday.

This course is of value to those desiring to prepare and place upon the market lines of specialties.
The coiu'se is elastic and designed to meet individual requirements. One may take up the study
of an entire series of preparations, or any one preparation in considerable detail. (Conditional
upon the enrollment of ten students.

Pharmacy, Phr. 14-e— Manufacture of Cosmetics and Toilet Prepara-
tions. 1 3^ hours' lectures and i3^ hours' laboratory work each week. Fee,
I24 and $5 special laboratory fee each session. Professor Wimmer and assistants.

7:30-10:30 p. m., Tuesday. Main lecture room, Pharmacy.

This course affords a thorough review of the entire subject of cosmetics and toilet preparations,
their composition and manufacture. Face lotions, hair dyes and other hair preparations, face pow-



f'-

44 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

ders and paints, cream (greasy, non-greasy and vanishing), toothwashes and powders, etc., are
studied and certain types are manufactured. (Conditional upon the enrollment of ten students.)
A summary of the lecture topics wiU be furnished upon request.

Pharmacy, Phr. 15-e — Perfurne Materials and Perfumery, i hour lec-
ture and 2 hours laboratory work each week. Fee, $50 each semester. A special
laboratory' fee must be paid b^v students taking the second semester. Professor
WnniER and assistants.

Monday 7 p. m. Main Lecture Hall.

This course is of value to persons employed in essential oil houses and perfume manufacturing
establishments and others desiring to enter tbJs field. The lectures are illustrated with lantern
slides and samples of the materials under discussion are exhibited. The laboratory work comprise
the determination of physical constants, testing for impurities, etc. A systematic course in nose-
training is included. The second semester consists mainly of practical work.

A summary of the course will be mailed upon request.

Microscopy, Phr. 16-e — Microanalysis of Drug Products. i}4 hours'
lecture and 2 hours' laboratory work each week. Fee, $20 each semester. Labora-
tory fee, $15 each session. Professor Ballard and assistants.

Monday — Lectures, 7:00-8:20 p. m. Laboratory, 8:30-10:30 p. m.

This course provides instruction in the identification and examination of powdered drugs, and
medicinal products amenable to microscopic examination. Satisfactory courses in botany, vege-
table histologj' and pharmacognosy are necessary prerequisites. (Conditional on an enrollment of
five students.)

Microscopy, Phr. 17-e — Microanalysis of Food Products. iH hours'
lecture and 2 hours' laboratory work each week. Fee, $20 each semester. Labora-
tory fee, $15 each session. Professor Ballard and assistants.

Monday — Lectures, 8:30-9:45 p. m. Laboratory, 7:00-8:30 p. m. and 9:45-
10:30 p. m.

This course provides instruction in the microscopic examination of foods and food products.
Satisfactory courses in botany and vegetable histology are necessary prerequisites. (Conditional
on an enrollment of five students.)

Bacteriology, Phr. 18-e — Principles and Practice of i hour lecture and
2 hours laboratory work each week. Fee, $24 each semester. Laboratory fee $15
each semester. Professor Hart and assistants.

Mondaj' — Lectures 7:00-8:00 p. m. Room 42, Pharmacy.

Monday — Laboratory 8:00-10:00 p. m.

This course includes the bacterial examination of sputum, excreta, water, air, mUk and ice.

Special attention is given to the methods of disinfection and sterilization. The major portion of
the time is devoted to the cultivation, morphology and staining properties of the more common
pathogenic bacteria.

Blood Analysis 19-8 — i hour lecture and 2 hours Laboratory work each week,
I semester. Fee $24 and Si 5 laboratory fee. Professor Hart and assistants.
7:00-10:00 p. m., Tuesday.
Tuesday — Lecture 7:00-8:00 p. m.
Tuesday — Laboratory 8:00-10:00 p. m.,

The entire semester is devoted to the chemical analysis of blood, the preparation of blood smears
and blood count.



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY



45



Parasites, Phr. 20-e — of the blood and intestines, i hour lecture and
2 hours laboratory work each week, i semester. Fee $24 and $15 laboratory fee.
Professor Hart and assistants.

Tuesday — 7:00-10:00 p, m.

In this course chief attention is given to changes from normal to abnormal blood due to parasites
as well as the more pathogenic blood and intestinal parasites.
Time is also allotted to the mycology of foods.

In the laboratory work, apparatus and material will be furnished without
charge. All broken, lost, or injured apparatus must be either replaced, or the
expense of such injury be borne by the student.



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE COLLEGE OF
PHARMACY OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK

OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES, I926-I927



President
Robert R. Gerstner

Honorary President
Adolph Henning

Vice-Presidents
V. K. Commons

Secretary
Joseph E. Adaiis

Treasurer
George C. Diekman

Registrar
Curt P. Wimmer



Richard Timmermann



Frederick D. Lascoff



Executive Board

Lewis Brown, 1928.
John H. Hecker, 1928.
Harry Taub, 1929.
May O'Connor Davis, 1928. David Newberger, 1929.

Hugo H. Schaefer, 1929.



Mabel Bauer, 1927.
Irene Timko, 1927.
Vito Calcagno, 1927.



C. P. Wimmer



Committee on Papers and Queries
Adolph Henning



John H. Hecker



Delegates to the American Pharmaceutical Association
Geo. C. Diekman C. P. Wimmer Jeannot Hostmann

Delegates to the New York State Pharmaceutical Association
Charles W. Ballard Orrin 0. Bigelow Vivian K. Commons

Delegates to the New Jersey Pharmaceutical Association
Harold McAdams Charles W\ Holton Harry E. Bischoff

Delegates to the Connecticut Pharmaceutical Association
Curt P. Wimmer Harold Levy Frank V. Damtoft



46



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 47

ENDOWMENTS

For ninety-seven consecutive years the College of Pharmacy of the City of
New York has maintained its annual courses of instruction for the education
and training of pharmacists. That this instruction has exhibited a steady ex-
tension and improvement is clearly recorded in the successive editions of its
annual prospectus. That such a result could not have been attained by the use
of students' fees, unaided by other resources, will be readily understood by all
who have had experience in educational administration. Such assistance may
be said to have begun with the generous contribution of free instruction services
by Professors Edward R. Squibb, Charles F. Chandler and others, in the early
history of the institution, and to have continued with the services of their suc-
cessors, and the unpaid management of officers and trustees. At various times,
financial crises have been met by generous donations of money by officers and



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