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students throughout the entire College course.

THE J. LEON LASCOFF PRIZES

Trustee J. Leon Lascoff offers annually to the fourth and fifth students on
the honor roll of the graduating class a year's membership in the American
Pharmaceutical Association and to the sixth and seventh students on the honor
roll a year's membership in any State Pharmaceutical Association.

TRUSTEES SCHOLARSHIPS

Two scholarships, entitling the winners to free tuition during the second year,
are granted by the College for each session. These scholarships are awarded to



28 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

the two members of the first-year College class who secure the highest averages
at the regular spring examinations.

THE GEORGE J. SEABURY SCHOLARSHIP

This scholarship has been founded by Dr. Henry C. Lovis, in memory of his
uncle, Mr. George J. Seabury, for many years a member and patron of the College.
It provides for the tuition, during the Senior (fourth) year of the University
course, of that member of this class who has maintained the highest standing
during the three years, provided, however, that such student is eligible for the
degree of B.S. in Phar., and shall not receive both this scholarship and the Max
J. Breitenbach prize.

THE ISAAC PLAUT FELLOWSHIP

This Fellowship for the encouragement of graduate study and original research
was founded by Mr. Albert Plant, in memory of his father, Isaac Plant.

Candidates for this Fellowship must have secured the degree of B.S. in Phar-
macy at this school, and must also possess credit for a year's study of a foreign
language, equivalent to that of the first year at Columbia College.

It provides for a year of study at a European school or university by that
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy of this College who shall have shown during his
full course of study here the greatest taste and aptitude for original investigation.
Should no member of a class be deemed worthy of the award, it will be withheld.

The Fellow shall be appointed by the Council of the University upon the
nomination of the Trustees of the College of Pharmacy. He shall attend a
foreign institution to be selected by himself and approved by the Faculty of the
College of Pharmacy, and shall pursue a course of study approved by the Faculty.
At the close of his incumbency he shall present to the Faculty a written report
of his work.

The Fellowship payment shall be made in three equal instalments, one on
June 15, one on November i, and one on March i, provided that the Fellow
continues faithfully to pursue the work undertaken. In case of failure so to do,
he shall forfeit all further privileges and emoluments conferred upon him by his
appointment to the Fellowship, and the Trustees of the College of Pharmacy
may declare the Fellowship vacant.

N.B. — Competition for the Kappa Psi Prize, the Seabury Scholarship and the
Plant Fellowship is open only to those students who take their entire course at
this College.

Since its foundation, the following Plaut Fellows have continued their studies
towards the degree of Ph.D.

Moritz A. Dittmar, B.S., 1920, Ph.D., University of Bern, Switzerland, 1922.
Assistant Superintendent of the laboratories of Lehn and Fink.

Herbert C. Kassner, B.S., 1921, Ph.D., University of London, England, 1923.
Associate Professor of Chemistry, Columbia University, College of Pharmacy.

Helen A. Timmerman, B.S., 1925, Ph.D., University of London, England,
1927. Instructor in Materia Medica, Columbia University, College of Pharmacy.

Fred Levine, B.S., 1927. Graduate student at the University of London,
England.



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 29

THE E. R. SQUIBB PRIZE

This is an annual cash prize of $100., founded by Messrs. E. R. Squibb & Sons,
in memory of Dr. E. R. Squibb. It is awarded to that graduate in Pharmacy
who exhibits the greatest proficiency in Analytical Chemistry during his second
year, as determined by the laboratory records.

THE LOUIS DOHME PRIZE

This is an annual cash prize of $100., founded by Messrs. Sharp & Dohme, in
memory of Mr. Louis Dohme. It is awarded to that graduate in Pharmacy who
exhibits the best practical knowledge of the drugs of the United States Pharma-
copceia and National Formulary, as determined by the laboratory records and
final examinations.

THE JOSEPH WEINSTEIN PRIZE

This prize consists of a compound microscope and is established by the New
York Retail Druggists' Association, in memory of Dr. Joseph Weinstein. It is
awarded to that graduate in Pharmacy who has exhibited the greatest proficiency
in Analytical Chemistry during the two years, as determined by the laboratory
records and the final examination, and who has not secured any other prize.

THE ITALIAN PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION PRIZE

This Association offers annually a gold medal to the member of the graduating
class who has obtained the highest general average in practical laboratory work
during the second year.

THE LEHN AND FINK PRIZE

This prize consists of a gold medal, offered by Messrs. Lehn and Fink, of New
York City, for the graduate attaining the highest standing at the examinations
in Pharmacy.

THE WESTCHESTER COUNTY PHARMACEUTICAL ASSOCIATION PRIZE

This Association offers annually a gold medal to that member of the graduating
class who has attained the highest general average in practical laboratory work,
during both years, in the Department of Pharmacy.

THE GERMAN APOTHECARY'S ASSOCIATION PRIZE

In commemoration of its foundation in the year 1851, the German Apothecary's
Association offers, annually, a gold medal to be awarded to that member of the
graduating class who has exhibited the greatest proficiency in the compounding
of prescriptions in the senior year.

THE OLSHANSKY MEMORIAL MEDAL

This is a gold medal, founded by the students of this school in attendance upon
the session of 1923-1924, in memory of their beloved instructor, Jacob Caiman
Olshansky, whose death occurred during that academic year. This medal is to
be awarded annually to that student who has attained the highest average in his
class in the subject of Dispensing Pharmacy.



30



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY



SYNOPSIS OF STUDIES FOR THE SESSION OF 1927-1928
(For information regarding subsequent years, see p. 79) .



MM 13-14
MM 15-16
MM 19-20
Chm. 1-2
Chm. 3-4
Chm. 5-6
Phr. 7-8

Phr. 9-10
Phr. 11-12



COLLEGE COURSE



First Year





Class


Laboratory Points




Hours


Hours




Botany-


I


4


6


Botany


2





4


Posology


I





2


General Physics


2





4


Inorganic Chemistry


3K





7


Analytical Chemistry


K


3


4


Theory of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical






Arithmetic and Latin


4





8


Practical Pharmacy





2


2


Dispensing Pharmacy





I


I



MM 59-60
MM 73-74
MM 61-62
Chm. 51-52
Chm. 53-54
Phr. 55-56
Phr. 57-58
Phr. 63-64



Second Year



Materia Medica
Toxicology
Pharmacognosy
Organic Chemistry
Analytical Chemistry
Practical Pharmacy
Dispensing Pharmacy
Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence
Commercial Pharmacy



and



Class


Laboratory


Points


Hours


Hours




3





6


I





2





3


3


4





8





3


3


3


2


8


I
1


I


3


iH


iK


4K



UNIVERSITY COURSE



First Year



MM 15-16
MM 21-22
MM 19-20
Chm. 1-2
Chm. 3-4
Chm. 13-14
Phr. 7-8

Phr. 9-10
Phr. 11-12
Coll. 17-18
Coll. 23-24



Class


Laboratory


Points


Hours


Hours




Botany 2





4


Plant Morphology and Histology i


A%


6K


Posology }4





I


Physics 2





4


Inorganic Chemistry 35^





7


Analytical Chemistry >^


3


4


Theory of Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical






Arithmetic and Latin 4-





8


Practical Pharmacy


4


4


Dispensing Pharmacy


I


I


English 3





6


American Government 3





6



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY



31



MM 59-60
MM 61-62
MM 73-74
Chm. 75-76
Chm. 53-54
Chm. 69
Phr. 55-56
Phr. 57-58
Phr. 63-64



Second Year



Materia Medica
Pharmacognosy
Toxicology
Inorganic Chem.
Analytical Chemistry
Physics

Practical Pharmacy
Dispensing Pharmacy
Commercial Pharmacy and
maceutical Jurisprudence



Class


Laboratory Points


Hours


Hours


3


6





3 3


I


2


3


6





3 3


I


2


3


3 9


I


2 4



Phar-



A'A



Third Year

Class
Hours
MM 1 1 7-1 1 8 Bacteriology i

MM 119-120 Morphology and Taxonomy of Crypto-

gams I

Chm. 103-104 Organic Chemistry 3

Chm. 107-108 Analytical Chemistry i

Phr. 1 09-1 10 Advanced Pharmacy 2

Phr. 111-112 Dispensing Pharmacy o



Laboratory Points
Hours



MM 151-152
MM 153-154
MM 155-156
Chm. 157-158
Chm. 159-160
Chm. 161-162
Phr. 163-164



Fourth Year



Applied Pharmacognosy
Botanical Taxonomy
Human Physiology
Inorganic Quantitative Analysis
Food Analysis and Toxicology
Biological Chemistry
Higher Pharmacy



Class
Hours


Laboratory
Hours


Points


M


5


6K





iM


iK


I





2


I


8


10


I


8


10


I





2


3


7


10



OUTLINE OF COURSES

CHEMISTRY

Chemistry 1-2 — General Physics. Lectures and recitations, 2 hours, 4
points. Professor A. Taub and instructors.

This course is so arranged as to emphasize those phases which have a direct bearing upon chem-
istry and pharmacy. After a consideration of the general properties of matter and the elements of
mechanics a number of lectures are devoted to the discussion of the kinetic molecular theory and to
wave motion. This is then followed by the consideration of chapters on sound, heat and magnetism.

The lectures are abundantly illustrated with experiments, the College possessing a fine set of
physical apparatus.

Text-book: Stewart, College Physics.

Chemistry 71 — Practical Physics. Laboratory course, 2 hours, 2 points.
Professor A. Taub and instructors.

This course has been transferred from the freshman to the sophomore year of the University
Class. It will therefore not be offered during the school year 1927-1928.

The course consists of sixteen half day periods of four hours each given during the second half
of the year.

Chemistry 3-4 — General Inorganic Chemistry. Lectures and recita-
tions, 33^ hours, 7 points. Professors Arny and A. Taub and instructors.

This course, the beginning of consecutive instruction in chemistry covering three years, is given
to the first year students of both the College and the University Classes. It opens with a careful
consideration of the fundamental principles of chemistry, special attention being given to the modern
theories concerning valence, chemical equilibrium, oxidation and reduction and atomic structure.

Exercises in writing and calculating chemical equations and work on problems in chemical
arithmetic are given in special quiz periods devoted exclusively to these important subjects.

On the side of descriptive chemistry, the non-metals and their compounds are discussed from
their cultural, technical and pharmaceutical view-points.

Text-books: Deming, General Chemistry, second edition; U. S. Pharmacopceia.

Chemistry 5-6 — Analytical Chemistry. (For First Year College Stu-
dents). Laboratory and recitations. 3^^ hours, 4 points. Professors Schaefer
and Macsata and instructors.

The course in analytical chemistry consists of laboratory instruction and is attended by the class
in sections. Each student is provided with the necessary equipment, and is required to perform
all the operations involved in qualitative chemical analysis. The uses of apparatus, the actions
of reagents, and the proper manner of bringing about chemical reactions are illustrated and ex-
plained. On account of the fundamental importance to the true understanding of the subject
the simple laws governing chemical action in solution and the formation of precipitates, the na-
ture of solution, etc., are explained to the student. At first, and under the guidance of the teacher,
the characteristic reactions of the basic components are studied in solution, or in the solid at a high
temperature. The phenomena observed are interpreted and discussed, and the conclusions re-
corded. Later, the reactions are represented by equations. The value of grouping is utilized
and separations and identifications of group members are performed. Finally, all facts acquired
by direct observation are brought together in the systematic procedure for analysis of mixtures.
In this recapitulation, individual effort is stimulated by independent work on samples of unlike
composition.

Text-book: Hostmann and McAdams, Laboratory Manual of Analytical Chemistry.

Chemistry 13-14 — Analytical Chemistry (for University Freshmen).
Laboratory and recitations. 3 3^ hours, 4 points. Professor Kassner and
instructors.

32



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 33

The student will first be made familiar with laboratory processes by means of a course of experi-
ments in general chemistry — isolation of elements, preparation of pure compounds by means of
precipitation, crystallization, etc. and examination of their properties. Simple laws and phenomena
will be explained to the student in the course of this work. In this way, experience in manipulation,
and a true understanding of the subject will be obtained.

This preliminary course leads to a systematic course in qualitative analysis but during the first
year the reactions of the basic ions only are studied. The student is taught the separation and
identification of these, and finally is required to analyze systematically solutions containing two or
more basic ions.

Chemistry 69 — General Physics (for University Sophomores). Lectures
and recitations. I hour, 2 points. Professor Schaefer and A. Taub.

This course is a continuation of Chemistry 1-2 (General Physics) and embraces the subjects of
electricity and light. Special consideration is given to ionization, electrolysis, the electron hypoth-
esis, the spectroscope, spectrum analysis, double refraction and the polariscope.

The lectures will be accompanied and made more interesting by many exhibitions and experi-
ments.

Text-book: Stewart, College Physics.

Chemistry 51-52 — Pharmaceutical and Organic Chemistry (for second
year college students.) Lectures and recitations, 4 hours, 8 points. Professors
Arny and A. Taub and instructors.

In the lecture course, special care is taken to keep the student instructed in the new and con-
stantly increasing applications of this science in the art of pharmacy and medicine. The preparation
of the more common organic chemicals is fully treated, and the possibilities of advances under
modern methods of research are presented to the student as they are reported. This department
of modern pharmaceutical education is becoming more important each year, and no pains are
spared to keep the instruction in Organic Chemistry fully up to the demands of the times.

All the official and the more important unofficial organic pharmaceutical chemicals and medi-
cinal products, notably the newer synthetic remedies, are taken up, explained in detail, and classi-
fied according to their position in the various organic groups. By this method of classification
the subject of organic pharmaceutical chemistry is presented in the same sequence as that of general
organic chemistry.

Text-book: Sadtler-Coblentz-Hostmann, Pharmaceutical Chemistry, sixth edition; U. S. Phar-
macopceia.

Chemistry 53-54 — Analytical Chemistry (for second year College and
University Classes). Laboratory course, 3 hours, 3 points. Professors Schaefer
and Macsata and instructors.

The early part of the second-year course is devoted to completing the instruction in qualita-
tive analysis. The discussion of the simpler fundamental laws governing chemical and physical
changes in solution, begun in the first year, are followed to conclusion. The preliminary testing
and preparation of a sample for analysis, involving solution in solvents other than water, and the
procedure for analysis of substances insoluble in water and acids, are studied and practiced. The
greater part of the time is devoted to the study of the acidic components.

Quantitative Analysis. — Instruction in quantitative analysis is then introduced. This training
is intended to enable the pharmacist to determine the purity of medicinal chemicals and to find
the percentage strength of preparations. Volumetric analysis being simple, rapid and accurate
for many medicinal substances, receives special consideration. As in the first year, all reactions
are discussed and the changes involved in them are represented by equations. The quantitative
significance of chemical changes is emphasized, derivation of equivalent quantities is discussed
and the use of empirical solutions is practiced. Accurate weighing and measuring are insisted on.
The student is obliged to perform careful and accurate determinations of the various components
in samples furnished him, and after checking his results, to render an extensive report.

Drug Assayings — The instruction in quantitative analysis is extended to the determination of
the amounts of the active or principal constituents of drugs and galenicals. Since in the potent
drugs and their preparations the quantities of the active constituents are very small, the sources



34 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

of error in assaying them must be reduced to a minimum. The treatment that must be carried out
for their isolation requires much care and skill in manipulation. It is for these reasons that this
work, of necessity, falls in the last part of the course, when the student shall have been sufficiently
trained to pursue the work intelligently and skillfully.
Text-book: U. S. Pharmacopcsia.

Chemistry 75-76 — Inorganic Chemistry (for University Sophomores).
Lectures and recitations, 3 hours, 6 points. Professors Arny and A. Taub and
instructors.

This course, a continuation of Chemistry 3-4 will be devoted to a consideration of the non-
metallic and metallic elements and their compounds. It will open with a discussion of ionization'
and throughout the course, all of the more important principles of theoretical inorganic chemistry
will be discussed. In descriptive chemistry, the course will consider the remaining non-metallic
elements and all of the more important metallic elements. These will be discussed from the stand-
point of modern industrial chemistry.

Text-book; Sadtler-Coblentz-Hostmann, Pharmaceutical Chemistry, sixth edition.

Chemistry 103-104 — Organic Chemistry (for University Juniors). Lectures
and recitations, 3 hours, 6 points. Professors Arny and A. Taub and instructors.

This course, a continuation of Chemistry 3-4 and 75-76, will be devoted to a comprehensive
study of the carbon compounds; special care being taken to keep the course abreast the new
applications of organic chemistry in pharmacy and medicine. The preparation of the more common
organic chemicals is given careful consideration and advances under modern methods of research
are presented to the class as they are reported.

All the official and the more important unofficial organic pharmaceutical chemicals and medicinal
products, notably the newer synthetic remedies, are taken up, explained in detail, and classified
according to their position in the various organic groiips. By this method of classification the
subject of organic pharmaceutical chemistry is presented in the same sequence as that of general
organic chemistry.

Text-book: Sadtler-Coblentz-Hostmann, Pharmaceutical Chemistry, sixth edition; U. S.
Pharmacopoeia.

Chemistry 130-131 — Theories of Chemistry (for University Juniors). Lec-
tures and recitations, i hour, 2 points. Professor Schaefer.

The object of this course is to bring together, to correlate and to elaborate somewhat the various
theories presented to the student in the regular chemistry and physics lectures. Consideration is
given to the kinetic theory, the gas laws, the laws governing change of state, the quantitative laws of
chemical combination, the atomic hypothesis, the laws of valence, the periodic system, radio
activity, atomic disintegration, atomic structure, solubility, ionization, indicators, equilibrium,
electrochemistry and colloids.

Special importance is placed upon the practical application of modern theories of physical
chemistry to analytical processes and methods.

Text-book: Chapin, College Chemistry.

Chemistry 107-108— Analytical Chemistry and Urine Analysis (for
University Juniors). Laboratory, 10 hours, 10 points. Professor Kassner
and instructors.

This laboratory course is given to the University Juniors in two groups, each group having 14
weeks of instruction.

The first period, comprising 100 hours, will be devoted principally to qualitative work. Students
will be supplied with pure and adulterated chemicals. Tests of purity and identity will be per-
formed upon the following: chloroform, ether, ethyl acetate, phenol, glycerol, alcohol, amyl
alcohol, cresol, creosote, acetanilid, chloral hydrate, paraldehyde, formaldehyde, acetphenetidin,
salicylic acid, acetylsalicylic acid and such other chemicals which will give the student practice in
the "General Tests" of U. S. P. X.



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 35

During the second period of 100 hours, gravimetric and volumetric methods will be studied.

The student will prepare normal acid and alkali solutions. The former will be standardized with
barium chloride and silver nitrate, the latter with potassium bitartrate, etc. The finished solutions
will then be run against each other. Following upon this, the student will prepare iodine, potassium
permanganate, sodium thiosulphate, etc., volumetric solutions. After standardizing same, he
will use them in volumetric assays not covered during the second year. The gasometric assays
of ethyl nitrite and amyl nitrite as well as the assay of volatile oils will then be taken up and will
extend into the third period of 100 hours which will be principally devoted to the proximate assays
of the U.S. P. and of galenicals.

The final period of 30 hours will be devoted to the analysis of urine. In addition to the routine
qualitative and quantitative tests, the student will receive instruction in the principles and use
of colorimeters and polarimeters.

Text-books: U. S. Pharmacopceia; Stieglitz, Qualitative Chemical Analysis; Amrhein, iV/onuoZ
of Urine Analysis.

Chemistry 157-158 — Inorganic Quantitative Analysis (for University
Seniors). Lectures i hour, laboratory, 8 hours, 10 points. Professor Kassner
and instructors.

The aim of the fourth-year work in Analytical Chemistry is to carry forward the instruction
in chemical analysis to such a point that the student may be able to execute the more important
chemical and pharmaceutical analyses.

The object of analytical chemistry is twofold, viz.: qualitative and quantitative. During
the first year the detection of the component elements of compounds of unknown composition
are studied, while the work of the second and third years-applies to determination of the relative
proportional amounts of the components of the various compounds studied, chiefly by the aid of
volumetric methods, leaving the more difficult and complex processes of gravimetric analysis
to be taken up in the fourth year.

The work will consist chiefly of gravimetric determinations, but will perforce include the test-
ing, adjusting and calibrating of delicate balances and other apparatus.

Text-book: Clowes and Coleman, Quantitative Analysis. Reference-book, Fresenius, Quanti-
tative Analysis.

Chemistry 159-160 — Food Analysis and Toxicology (for University
Seniors). Lectures I hour, laboratory, 8 hours, 10 points. Professors x^rny
and Kassner and instructor.

In order to give every advantage to the instruction in this department during the fourth year,
the College has provided very complete apparatus, which supplies the very best facilities that mod-
em science siffords.

The work in this department will cover the following courses:

I. Analysis of various foodstuSs, including milk, butter, flavoring extracts, etc.

a. Chemical and sanitary examination of water.

3. Isolation and detection of organic and inorganic poisons.

In addition to the laboratory work just outlined there will be a lecture course of thirty hours
extending through the entire year, describing the various chemical methods of food examination
and explaining the principles underlying the more complex physical instruments employed by the
students In their laboratory course.

Text-books: Leach, Pood Analysis; Autenrieth-Warren, Detection of Poisons; Mason, Examina-
tion of Water.

Reference-Book: Allen, Commercial Analysis.

Chemistry 161-162 — Biological Chemistry (for University Seniors). Lec-



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