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Twenty-ninth Series, No. 52 September 28, 1929

COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
OF THE CITY OF

NEW YORK ;iy'^

L

1929-1930




113-119 WEST 68th street

NEW YORK



Columbia ^nibersitp bulletin of information

Twentj'-ninth Series, No. 52 September 28, 1929

Issued weekly at Columbia University, Morningside Heights, New York, N. Y. Entered as second-
class matter August 10, 1918, at the Post Office at New York, N. Y., under the Act of August 24,
1912. Acceptance for mailing at a special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103, Act of
October 3, 1917, authorized. These include:

1. Reports of the President and Treasurer to the Trustees.

2. The Catalogue Number, the Directory Number and the Announcements of the several
Colleges and Schools, and of certain Divisions, relating to the work of the next year. These are
made as accurate as possible, but the right is reserved to make changes in detail as circumstances
require. The current number of any of these Announcements will be sent without charge upon
application to the Secretary of the University.

C. U. P. 21,500-1929



For special or more detailed information than is given in this
announcement, applicants are requested to address the Registrar of
the College, 115 West Sixty-eighth Street. His office hours are as
follows: From September i, 1929 to May i, 1930, daily except Sat-
urdays, 9 a. m. to 5 p. m. ; Saturdays, 9 a. m. to 12 m. Other por-
tions of the year, daily (except Saturdays), 9:30 a. m. to 4 p. m.;
Saturdays, 9:30 a. m. to 12 m.



PUBLISHED FOR THE UNIVERSITY BY THE
COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY PRESS




COLLEGE OF PHARMACY OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK

II3-II9 WEST SIXTY-EIRHTH STREET



Columbia University

in the City of New York



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY

OF THE CITY OF

NEW YORK

1929-1930




II 3-1 19 WEST 68th street

NEW YORK



This College reserves the right to make such changes in the
curriculum, schedule, calendar and regulations appearing in
this announcement, as circumstances may require.



TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE

Officers and Trustees 5

Committees of the Trustees 6

Faculty 7

General Statement 9

Important Announcements, Graduate Course 13

College of Pharmacy, General Statement 13

The Library 14

Information Bureau 14

Employment for Students 15

Application for Admission 15

N. Y. State Qualifying Certificate 15

Apprentice License 16

Health Certificate 16

Courses Offered 16

Entrance Requirements, College Course 18

University Courses 18

Fees 21

Method of Instruction 22

Regulations of Board of Trustees 23

Requirements for Regular Students 23

Requirements for Graduation 24

Prizes and Scholarships 24

Synopsis of Studies 28

Courses of Instruction 30

Summer Courses 43

Evening Courses 44

Alumni Association 48

Endowments 49

Register of Graduates and Students 52

Scheme of Attendance 72

Academic Calendar 78

Index 81



1929





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OFFICERS AND TRUSTEES

OFFICERS

Nicholas Murray Butler President

William J. Schieffelin Honorary President

Henry C. Lovis First Vice-President

Edward Plaut Second Vice-President

V. Chapin Daggett Third Vice-President

Clarence O. Bigelow Treasurer

Charles W. Holton Secretary

Arthur J. Bauer Assistant Secretary

Walter B. Simpson Registrar

Eleanor Kerker Assistant Registrar

Messrs. Sullivan & Cromwell, 49 Wall St., New York, N. Y Counsel



trustees



David Costelo, 1930
Nathaniel Nicolai, 1930
Charles J. McCloskey, 1930
Charles S. Littell, 1930
Herman Walter, 1930
Charles Friedgen, 1931
Adolph Henning, 1 93 1



J. Leon Lascoff, 1931
William W. Conley, 1931
Richard H. Timmermann, 1931
William S. Gordon, 1932
Irving McKesson, 1932
Albert E. Stratton, 1932
Theodore Weicker, 1932



Jacob Weil, 1932

committees

Instruction Committee

Henry C. Lovis, Chairman, 87 Maiden Lane
C. O. Bigelow V. Chapin Daggett

David Costelo Charles W. Holton

Dean H. H. Rusby, ex-officio



Finance Committee

Clarence O. Bigelow, Chairman, 412 Sixth Avenue
Adolph Henning Edward Plaut

Henry C. Lovis David Costelo

Dean H. H. Rusby, ex-officio
5



6 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

Examination Committee
David Costelo, Chairman, 6 West 51st Street
Arthur J. Bauer Charles Friedgen

Wm. S. Gordon Charles J. McCloskey

Membership Committee
J. Leon Lascoff, Chairman, 1223 Lexington Avenue
Nathaniel Nicolai Herman Walter

Albert E. Stratton William W. Conley

Library Committee
Richard H. Timmermann, Chairman, 802 Lexington Avenue
Charles J. McCloskey Charles S. Littell

Property Committee
Adolph Henning, Chairman, Summit, N. J.
C. O. Bigelow Edward Plaut

Irving McKesson Jacob Weil

Honors Committee
David Costelo, Chairman Dean H. H. Rusby

Henry C. Lovis



/



FACULTY OF THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY

OFFICERS

Nicholas Murray Butler, LL.D. (Cantab.), D.Litt. (Oxon.), Hon.D. (Paris)

President

Henry H. Rusby, M.D., Ph.M Dean

Henry V. Arny, Ph.M., Ph.D Associate Dean and Elected Member of

the University Council

George C. Diekman, Ph.G., M.D Secretary

Virgil Coblentz, A.M., Ph.D., Phar.M., F.C.S. Professor Emeritus of Chemistry

George C. Diekman, Ph.G., M.D Professor Emeritus of Pharmacy

Henry H. Rusby, M.D., Ph.M Professor of Materia Medica

Henry V. Arny, Ph.M., Ph.D Professor of Chemistry

Curt P. Wimmer, A.M., Ph.M., Phar.D Professor of Pharmacy

Carlton C. Curtis, Ph.D.. . .Associate Professor of Botany, Columbia University

Charles C. Lieb, A.B., M.D Professor of Pharmacology

Charles W. Ballard, Ph.Ch., A.M., Ph.D. Associate Professor of Materia Medica

Hugo H. Schaefer, Ph.C, Ph.D Associate Professor of Chemistry

Lewis N. Brown, Phar.D Associate Professor of Pharmacy

Herbert C. Kassner, B.S., Ph.D Associate Professor of Chemistry

Fanchon Hart, Ph.G Acting Associate Professor of Materia Medica

Horace M. Carter, Ph.G., B.S Associate Professor of Pharmacy

Harry Taub, B.S., A.M Assistant Professor of Materia Medica

Frederick D. Lascoff, Ph.G., B.S Assistant Professor of Phartnacy

in Charge of Commercial Pharmacy

Jacob Dorfman, Ph.G., A.M Assistant Professor of Pharmacy

William Macsata, Ph.Ch., B.S Assistant Professor of Chemistry

Abraham Taub, B.S., A.M Assistant Professor of Physics and Chemistry

instructors

Leslie Jayne, Ph.Ch., B.S Instructor in Chemistry

Philip Kerker, A.B Instructor in Materia Medica

Saul Kaye, Ph.G Instructor in Pharmacy

Frank Pokorny, Ph.Ch Instructor in Materia Medica

Joseph E. Adams, Ph.Ch., B.S Instructor in Materia Medica

Aleita Hopping, Ph.D Instructor in Physiology

Maxwell Karshan, B.S., Ph.D Instructor in Biological Chemistry

William Keenan, Ph.G Instructor in Materia Medica

Milton D. Sewell, Ph.G., B.S histructor in Chemistry

7



8 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

Theodore Failmezger, Ph.Ch Instructor in Chemistry

Joseph P. Miale, Ph.Ch Instructor in Pharmacy

Samuel Liberman, Ph.Ch., B.S Instructor in Chemistry

Victor Lewitus, Ph.G., B.S., A.M Instructor in Materia Medica

Rudolf Hauck, Ph.Ch., B.S Instructor in Pharmacy

Herman J. Amsterdam, Ph.G., B.A Instructor in Pharmacy

Charles H. Soren, Ph.G., B.S Instructor in Chemistry

Edward Anzelmi, Ph.Ch Instructor in Chemistry

Margu"erite C. Dimler, Ph.Ch., B.S Instructor in Chemistry

DoMiNiCK Fanelli, Ph.Ch., B.S Instructor in Pharmacy

Lester C. Dick, Ph.Ch Instructor in Pharmacy

Horace T. F. Givens, Ph.Ch Instructor in Pharmacy

lecturers
Isidore Neustaedter, Phar.D., LL.B. Lecturer in Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence

George D. McJimsey, M.A Lecturer in English and American Government

Arthur H. Ingenhuett Lecturer in German

UNIVERSITY officers OF ADMINISTRATION

Frank Diehl Fackenthal, A.B Secretary of the University

Adam Leroy Jo>fES, Ph.D Director of University Admissions

Charles C. Williamson, Ph.D Director of Libraries

Roger Howson, M J\. Librarian

David M. Updike, M.E Superintendent of Buildings and Grounds

Henry V. Arny, Ph.D Librarian of the College of Pharmacy

Edward J. Grant, A.B Registrar of the University

Charles S. Danielson Bursar of the University

Henry Lee Norris, M.E Director of Works



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

Columbia University was founded in 1754 as Kings College by royal grant of
George II, King of England, "for the Instruction of Youth in the Learned Lan-
guages, and the Liberal Arts and Sciences. " The Revolutionary War interrupted
its active work; but in 1784 it was reopened as Columbia College. In 1912,
the title was changed to Columbia University in the City of New York.

The University at the present time consists of Columbia College, the under-
graduate college of liberal arts, which offers a program of studies leading to the
degree of Bachelor of Arts; the School of Law, with courses leading to the de-
grees of Bachelor and Master of Laws and Doctor of Law (Doctor Juris); the
School of Medicine with courses leading to the degree of Doctor of Medicine;
the School of Engineering, with courses leading to the Bachelor of Science degree,
the several engineering degrees and the degree of Master of Science; the School
of Architecture, with courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Architecture
and Master of Science; the School of Journalism, with courses leading to the de-
grees of Bachelor of Literature and Master of Science; the School of Business,
with courses leading to the degrees of Bachelor and Master of Science; the School
of Dental and Oral Surgery, with courses leading to the degrees of Bachelor of
Science and Doctor of Dental Surgery; the School of Library Service, with courses
leading to the degrees of Bachelor of Science and Master of Science; Seth Low
Junior College offering two years of collegiate work in preparation for admission
to professional schools or to more advanced work in Liberal Arts and Sciences in
Columbia University; the non-professional graduate Faculties of Political Science,
Philosophy and Pure Science, with courses leading to the degrees of Master of
Arts and Doctor of Philosophy,

In addition to these schools and faculties, the University includes the independ-
ent corporations of Barnard College, the undergraduate college for women, with
courses leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts; Teachers College, including the
Faculties of Education and Practical Arts, with courses leading to the degrees of
Bachelor of Science, Master of Arts and Master of Science; the College of Phar-
macy of the City of New York, with courses leading to the degrees of Phar-
maceutical Chemist, Bachelor of Science and Doctor of Pharmacy; St. Stephen's
College, Annandale, New York, an undergraduate college for men with courses
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts; and the Union Theological Seminary,
whose faculty conducts certain University work leading to the degree of Master
of Arts.

The University maintains three sessions during the year: The Winter Session,
beginning the last Wednesday of September and ending the first Tuesday of
February; the Spring Session, beginning the first Wednesday of February and
ending the second Wednesday of June; and the Summer Session of six weeks'
duration, beginning immediately after July 4. Through its system of University
Extension the opportunity is offered to men and women to pursue subjects in-
cluded in a liberal education and to take courses toward a diploma or an academic
degree; Home Study courses are also offered to persons who are unable to take
work in residence.

9



lo COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

ADMISSION

A student accepted and registered by the proper authorities as having fulfilled
the preliminary qualifications for candidacy for a degree, certificate of pro-
ficiency, or diploma, is enrolled as a matriculated student of the University. A
period of regular attendance upon all stated academic exercises amounting to
at least one academic year must be completed by every candidate for a degree.

A student not enrolled as a matriculated student may enter the University
as a non-matriculated student, and be permitted to attend such courses of in-
struction as he is qualified to take, but not as a candidate for a degree, certificate
of proficiency, or diploma. Such students are expected to conform to the same
standard of attendance and scholarship as are required of matriculated students.
Non-matriculated students may receive a formal statement of the satisfactory
completion of any course.

In the Announcement of each School will be found the specific conditions govern-
ing admission to courses of instruction and to candidacy for a degree.

The admission, continuance upon the rolls, and graduation of any student,
is subject to the full disciplinary power of the University authorities, as pre-
scribed by the Statutes of the University.

No student registered in any school or college of the University shall at the same
time be registered in any other school or college, either of Columbia University
or of any other institution, without the consent of the appropriate Dean or
Director.

WITHDRAWAL

An honorable discharge will always be granted to any student in good academic
standing, and not subject to discipline, who may desire to withdraw from the
University; but no student under the age of twenty-one years shall be entitled
to a discharge without the assent of his parent or guardian furnished in writing
to the proper Dean or Director. Students withdrawing are required to notify
the Registrar. Applications for the return of fees must be made in writing at
the time of withdrawal.

The Dean or Director of the school or faculty concerned may, for reasons of
weight, grant a leave of absence to a student in good standing.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

The Announcements of each College or School, of the Summer Session, of Uni-
versity Extension, and of the several divisions under which the departments of
instruction are grouped, may be obtained without charge from the Secretary of
the University.

The Announcement of each School contains a schedule of fees and expenses
for the courses in that School.



The libraries of the University contain about 1,132,236 volumes, exclusive of
unbound pamphlets. The various departments of instruction have also special
libraries in connection with their lecture rooms and laboratories. The Avery



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY ii

Architectural Library, the Law Library, the Ella Weed Library of Barnard Col-
lege, Teachers College Library, and the libraries of the College of Physicians and
Surgeons, the School of Dental and Oral Surgery, and the College of Pharmacy,
are all available to students of the University.

RESIDENCE HALLS

There are four residence halls for men on South Field: Furnald with 282
rooms, Hartley with 300, John Jay with 476 and restaurants adequate for all
men students, and Livingston with 300 rooms. Johnson Hall, on East Field,
with accommodations of room and board for 360 students in the graduate and
professional schools is a residence hall for women.

All the University residence halls, for both men and women, are under the
supervision of advisory committees appointed by the President, consisting of
University officers and assisted by committees made up of residents in the halls.

Copies of Residence Halls Announcements giving floor plans and dormitory
regulations together with application blanks will be furnished on request by
the Secretary of the University, 213 Library.

Detailed information and advice concerning desirable rooms and boarding
places in the vicinity of the campus for both men and women may be obtained
by writing to the Residence Bureau, Room M, Earl Hall.

In addition to the dining-halls in John Jay and Johnson the University main-
tains the following cafeteria restaurants (service a la carte) which furnish whole-
some food at moderate rates: The Commons (men and women) University;
Barnard Hall Lunch Room (women) Barnard Hall; Teachers College Cafeteria
(men and women) Grace Dodge Hall, 121 St. The Columbia University Press
Bookstore, located in the basement of Journalism, conducts a soda fountain
where light luncheons are served.

GYMNASIUM

The Gymnasium is completely fitted with gymnastic apparatus and contains a
swimming pool, baths, rooms for rowing, fencing, boxing and wrestling, and hand-
ball courts. It is open daily to male students of the University during the aca-
demic year, except on Sundays and legal holidays. Every student is entitled to a
physical examination by the Medical Director. On the basis of this examination,
advice is given as to the kind and amount of exercise best adapted to his needs.
Barnard Hall, of Barnard College, and Thompson Hall, of Teachers College,
are thoroughly equipped with physical training facilities for women students.

EARL HALL

Earl Hall was given to Columbia University by the late William Earl Dodge
for the religious and social activities of the students. On the main floor, reached
by the campus entrance, are the Appointments Office, Residence Bureau, Men's
Residence Halls Office (where may also be found the Director of Earl Hall who
is in charge of social affairs on the campus), the Trophy Room and Lobby, con-
taining team pictures and trophies. On the upper floor are located offices for the
Chaplain of the University and the Director of Religious Activities; an audi-



12 COLUMBIAUNIVERSITY -

torium seating 400 people is available for student receptions and dances. The
first floor (entrance from Broadway) is occupied by the offices of the University
Medical Ofificer.

MEDICAL SERVICE

The University Medical Officer has direct supervisir,n of all matters affecting
the health of the student body. All cases of illness, especially communicable
diseases, must be promptly reported to him. Absence from classes due to illness
must also be reported to his office. The University Medical Officer, and the mem-
bers of his stafT, hold office hours daily in Earl Hall for consultation with students.

Members of the University who need medical attention at home, and who
desire to be advised concerning private physicians, specialists and nursing care,
will receive such information upon applying at the office of the University
Medical Officer.



Online LibraryCollege of Pharmacy of the City of New YorkCollege of pharmacy of the City of New York (Volume 1924/25-1930/31) → online text (page 44 of 61)