College of Pharmacy of the City of New York.

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This course, a continuation of Chemistry 3-4 and Sj-sO, will be devoted to a comprehensive
study of the carbon compounds; special care being taken to keep the course abreast the new ap-
plications of organic chemistry in pharmacy and medicine. The preparation of the more common
organic chemicals is given careful consideration and advances under modern methods of research
are presented to the class as they are reported.

All the official and the more important unofficial organic pharmaceutical chemicals and medicinal
products, notably the newer synthetic remedies, are taken up and classified according to their
position in the various organic groups. By this method of classification the subject of organic
pharmaceutical chemistry is presented in the same sequence as that of general organic chemistry.

Textbook: Sadtler-Coblentz-Hostmann, Pharmaceutical Chemistry, sixth edition; U. S. Phar-
macopoeia.

Chemistry 107-108 — Newer remedies (third-year College Students).
Lecture and recitations i>^ hours, 3 points. Professor Schaefer and instructors.

The aim of this course is to make the students familiar with the many preparations generally
classified as "synthetics" which are prescribed by physicians but which are not official. Most of
these preparations are rather recent additions to our materia medica and many of them are covered
by patents. The products are not selected because of their medicinal merit but rather because of
the frequency with which they are prescribed. Not only will the chemistry of these preparations
be considered, but whenever possible, original packages will be shown to the students and the names
of their manufacturers given.

Textbooks: New and Non-official Remedies.



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37



Chemistry 109— Analytical chemistry (third-year College Students).
Laboratory 6 hours for }4 year, 3 points. Professors Schaefer, Macsata and
instructors.

This course will be given in six-hour periods to one section during the first half year and to the
other section during the second half. This will enable the student to perform operations which
require more time than is available in the usual three-hour period. The course will be devoted
entirely to pharmaceutical testing and assaying. Some of the more important operations to be
carried out are: — The preparation and standardization of volumetric solutions, testing the purity
and strength of official chemicals and galenicals, selected gravimetric determinations, iodine values,
saponification values, examination of oils, identification of alkaloids. The assay of crude drugs
will be given special attention by dividing the section into still smaller groups for this work thus
insuring better and more careful supervision. Practice will of course be given in the use of the
analytical balance.

Textbooks: United States PharmacopcBia and National Formulary.

Chemistry 110 — Same as Chemistry log, but given during the second half of
year.

Chemistry 106 — Analytical chemistry and urine analysis (for Uni-
versity Juniors). Laboratory, 17 hours for 18 weeks, beginning December 16,
1929, 10 points. Professor Kassner and instructors.

During the first part of the course, the student is supplied with pure and adulterated samples of
oflacial organic chemicals and is required to test them for identity and purity to determine whether
they conform to the requirements of the Pharmacopoeia, each sample studied representing a typical
class of organic compound. This work also involves the determination of congealing, boiling and
melting points, fractionations, alcoholmetric estimations and other determinations of like character.

The second section of the course is devoted to volumetric analysis, the solutions used being
prepared and standardized by the student. The substances assayed include antiseptics, disin-
fectants, ointments, volatile oils, etc.

The third part of the year's work deals with the assaying of vegetable drugs, including the
determination of alkaloids in crude drugs and their pharmaceutical products, crude fiber, soluble
extractive, etc.

The above course is concluded with certain miscellaneous assays. The final period is devoted to
the analysis of urine.

Textbook: U. S. Pharmacopoeia.

Chemistry 151-152 — Inorganic quantitative analysis (for University
Seniors). Lectures i hour a week for 32 weeks, laboratory, 29 hours a week for
8 weeks, beginning September 23, 1929, 10 points. Professor Kassner and
instructors.

The aim of this course is to train the student to carry out with precision many of the more difficult
analyses of chemical and pharmaceutical products.

The laboratory work of the course consists, in the main, of a series of selected gravimetric deter-
minations covering a wide field of substances, chosen to illustrate typical methods of procedure.
This work is supplemented by operations involving the use of the viscosimeter, bomb calorimeter,
etc.

In the lecture course, methods of quantitative analysis, gravimetric, volumetric, colorimetric,
etc., are discussed at length and compared.

Reference books: Clowes and Coleman, Quantitative Analysis. Scott, Standard Methods of
Chemical Analysis.

Chemistry 153-154— Food analysis and toxicology (for University Sen-
iors). Lectures i hour a week for 32 weeks, laboratory 29 hours a week for 8
weeks, beginning November 18, 1929, 10 points. Professors Arny and Kassner
and instructor.



38 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

In order to give every advantage to the instruction in this department during the fourth year,
the College has provided very complete apparatus, which supplies the very best faciUties that mod-
ern science affords.

The work in this department will cover the follo\^'ing courses:

1. Analysis of various foodstuffs, including milk, butter, flavoring extracts, etc.

2. Chemical and sanitary examination of water.

3. Isolation and detection of organic and inorganic poisons.

In addition to the laboratory work just outlined there will be a lecture course describing the
various chemical and physical methods of food examination.

Textbooks: Leach, Food Analysis; Mason, Examination 0/ Water.

Reference Books: Allen, Commercial Analysis; Autenrieth- Warren, Detection of Poisons.

Pharmacy 1-2 — Theory of pharmacy (including metrology and phar-
maceutical arithmetic) (first-year College and University Classes) . Lectures
2 hours, Recitation i hour. Professors Wimmer, Brown, Carter and instruc-
tors. 6 points.

This course introduces the student to the fundamentals of pharmaceutical science. It includes
a series of lectures on the histor>' of pharmacy, beginning nith the Egj-ptian age and tracing it
through the Roman, Arabian and European periods up to the present time. Special stress is laid
on the historical development of American pharmacy, its organization and its code of ethics.

The course continues with the study of elementari' pharmaceutical operations, such as evapora-
tion, distillation, sublimation, solution, crystallization, precipitation, filtration, etc. The lectures
are profusely illustrated by exhibitions of apparatus and lantern slides.

The lectures in pharmaceutical arithmetic begin OTth the subject of metrologj"- and cover the
simpler kind and type of calculation used in pharmacy.

Textbooks: U. S. Pharmacopceia X; Amy's Principles of Pharmacy; Stunner, Pharmaceutical
Arithmetic.

Pharmacy 3 — Manufacturing pharmacy laboratory (first-year College
Class). Laboratory course, 3 hours, Recitation i hour, 16 weeks beginning
September 24, 1929. Professors Brown, Dorfmax and instructors. 2 J^ points.

The work of this course is elementary in nature and affords students the opportunity to apply
practically their theoretical knowledge of the different systems of weights and measures, the deter-
mination of the specific gravities of various substances, the determination of alcoholic contents of
liquids, the purification and granulation of salts and the manufacture of simple galenical pre-
parations.

Textbooks: Diekman and Wimmer, Manufacturing Pharmacy Laboratory Notes and U. S.
Pharmacopceia.

Pharmacy 5 — Manufacturing pharmacy laboratory (Freshmen University
Class). Laboratory course, 5 hours, Recitation i hour, 16 weeks beginning
September 24, 1929. Professor Carter and instructors. 3>^ points.

The work of this course is identical with that outlined under course 3 for the first-year College
Class, with an additional two hours of laboratory work. It is the purpose of this course not only
to provide the University student with the same work that is done by the College student, but also
to give him additional time to the performance of such work as pertains to retail pharmacy, inas-
much as the work of his tliird year will be essentially devoted to operations pertaining to the
manufacture of chemicals on a large scale.

Textbooks: Diekman and Wimmer, Manufacturing Pharmacy Laboratory Notes and U. S.
Pharmacopeia.

Pharmacy 8 — Dispensing pharmacy laboratory (first-jear College Class).
Laboratory course, 3 hours. Recitation i hour, 1 6 weeks beginning January 28,
1930. Professors Brown, Dorfman and instructors. 2}^ points.

This course embraces general methods of compounding pills, troches, bacilli, emulsions, oint-
ments, suppositories and the simpler types of prescriptions. It includes theoretical instruction



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY



39



and training in practical work. The habits of neatness and, above all, of accuracy acquired by the
students is of direct and immediate advantage to them in rendering their services more valuable.
Textbooks: Diekman and Wimmer, Dispensing Pharmacy Laboratory Notes, U. S. Pharma-
copoeia and National Formulary.

Pharmacy 10— Dispensing pharmacy laboratory (Freshman University
Class). Laboratory course, 5 hours, Recitation i hour, 16 weeks beginning
January 28, 1930. Professor Carter and instructors. 2>H points.

The work of the dispensing pharmacy laboratory course for the freshman University Class is
identical with that outlined under course 8 for the first-year College Class, with an additional two
hours of laboratory work.

Textbooks: Diekman and Wimmer, Dispensing Pharmacy Laboratory Notes, U. S. Pharmacopoeia
and National Formulary.

Pharmacy 51-52 — Theoretical pharmacy (including pharmaceutical
Latin) (second-year College and University Classes). Lectures, 2 hours. Recita-
tion I hour. Professors Wimmer, Dorfman and instructors. 6 points.

During the first semester of this course, one hour weekly is devoted to the general methods of
manufacturing liquid, solid and semi-solid pharmaceutical preparations. The general principles
involved in the manufacture of fluidextracts, tinctures, syrups, elixirs, masses, pills, etc. are studied
in detail. The other hour of lecture is given over to pharmaceutical Latin, when principles of
etymology, construction of sentences and grammar, necessary to an intelligent understanding of
Latin used in prescriptions, are studied.

During the second semester, the study of the solid and semi-solid preparations of the United
States Pharmacopoeia and National Formulary is begun and completed.

Textbooks: U. S. Pharmacopoeia X, National Formulary V, Sturmer, Pharmaceutical Latin.

Pharmacy 55 — Dispensing pharmacy laboratory (second-year College
Class). Laboratory course, 3 hours, Recitation i hour, 16 weeks beginning
September 23, 1929. Professors Brown, Dorfman and instructors. 2)4 points.

The work in the dispensing pharmacy laboratory is a continuation of the work of the first year.
It deals more especially with prescriptions and includes the compounding and dispensing of the
various types requiring technical knowledge and skill. Consideration is given to tablet triturates,
mucilages, mixtures, the filling of capsules, cachets, collapsible tubes, etc. General instruction is
given in the reading and interpretation of prescriptions, the recognition of the various constituents,
of their ingredients, together with the proper methods and manner of dispensing them.

Textbooks: Diekman and Wimmer, Dispensing Pharmacy Laboratory Notes; Scoville, "The Art
of Compounding," U. S. Pharmacopoeia and National Formulary.

Pharmacy 57 — Dispensing pharmacy laboratory (Sophomore University
Class). Laboratory course, 7 hours. Recitation l hour, 16 weeks beginning Sep-
tember 23, 1929. Professors Brown, Carter and instructors. 4K points.

The work of this course is divided into two laboratory periods, one of three hours which covers
all of the work as outlined under course ss of the second-year College Class, and one of four hours
consisting of the compounding and dispensing of classes of preparations such as mixtures, draughts,
lotions, solutions, emulsions, confections and jellies, pills, boli, dragees, lozenges, pastilles, lamels
and orbicules, compressed tablets, powders, cachets, suppositories, pessaries and ointments, etc.

Textbooks: Diekman and Wimmer, Dispensing Pharmacy Laboratory Notes; Scoville, "The Art
of Compounding," U. S. Pharmacopoeia and National Formulary.

Pharmacy 54 — Manufacturing pharmacy laboratory (second-year College
and University Classes). Laboratory course, 3 hours, Recitation i hour, 16
weeks beginning January 27, 1930. Professors Brown, Carter, Dorfman and
instructors. 2)4 points.



40 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

The work in the manufacturing pharmacy laboratory is a continuation of the work of the first
year. In general consideration is here given to calcination, crystallization, solubility determina-
tions, percentage solutions, the manufacture of tinctures, fluidextracts and extracts by percolation,
and the preparation of various classes of galenicals, together with the manufacture of the more
simple chemicals and chemical preparations.

Textbooks: Diekman and Wimmer, Manufacturing Pharmacy Laboratory Notes and U. S.
Pharmacopcsia.

Pharmacy 59-60 — Commercial pharmacy and pharmaceutical juris-
prudence (second-year College and University Classes). Lectures ij4 hours.
Laboratories i ^ hours. 4^2 points. Professor Lascoff and Lecturer Neustaed-
TER.

This course in commercial pharmacy is designed to give the student a practical knowledge of the
basic principles that underlie the successful management of a business. Owing to a lack of knowledge
of these principles, many pharmacists have failed to achieve the degree of success to which their
professional knowledge and training entitle them.

The course consists of all the activities incidental to the opening and operation of a retail drug
store, including the choice of location, the elements of business administration and store manage-
ment, insurance, problems of retail merchandising, including the value of discounts, banking,
principles of advertising and salesmanship, business correspondence as well as the elements of
systematic bookkeeping.

The accounting records are the basic source of data for business management. Accordingly,
the course in commercial pharmacy will be devoted largely to the principles underlying the making
and interpretation of these records.

The course develops the subject rapidly, devoting its time and emphasis to the foundational
problems of accounting. It is built up along the lines and methods of modern accounting practice.
The subject matter includes: theories of debit and credit; classification of accounts; underlying
principles of various accounting records; bsuiness papers and documents used as the basis for first
entry; simple problems of the balance sheet and income statement; single entry; controlling ac-
counts; handling sales and purchases; safeguarding the cash; consignments, and related topics.
Ample practice for students is provided. The work will be related to the modern pharmacy.

This course is also designed to familiarize the student with the general provisions of state and
Federal laws governing the practice of pharmacy. Ordinances and regulations having local
application only will likewise be studied.

Special attention will be given to the prohibition and anti-narcotic laws and regulations.

A knowledge of these laws and regulations is essential to the proper and safe conduct of a drug
store or pharmacy.

Pharmacy 101-102 — Theoretical pharmacy (third-year College Class).
Lectures 2 hours, Recitation i hour. Professors Wimmer, Brown and instructors.
6 points.

During the first semester, the study of the U. S. Pharmacopoeia and National Formulary galenical
preparations is continued and completed. Their methods of preparation are individually studied
and the reasons for each step taken in their preparation are given. The second semester is devoted
to the study of non-official important galenical, cosmetic and toilet preparations, as well as to the
study of the pharmacy of individual substances used in prescriptions.

Textbooks: U . S. Pharmacopceia, National Formulary V, American Pharmaceutical Association
Recipe Book.

Pharmacy 103-104 — Theoretical dispensing pharmacy (third-year College
Class). Lectures i hour, Recitation i hour. Professor Wimmer and instructors.
4 points.

This course is devoted in the main to the study of the problems encountered by the pharmacist
in his prescription work. Prescriptions of all kinds, especially such as present some difficulties, are
studied with the aid of lantern slides. The numerous incompatibilities of present-day prescription
work are discussed, as well as ways of avoiding or overcoming them. The subject of Homeopathy
receives the attention it deserves.

Textbooks: Scoville, The Art of Compounding; Ruddiman, Incompatibilities.



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 41

Pharmacy 107-108— Dispensing pharmacy laboratory (third-year College
Class). Laboratory course, 4 hours. Professors Brown, Dorfman and instruc-
tors. 4 points.

The work in the dispensing pharmacy laboratory deals particularly with the various phases
of prescription dispensing, such as checking, labeling, pricing and delivery, etc. The all-important
subject of chemical, pharmaceutical and therapeutical incompatibilities is thoroughly studied.
The continual introduction of new remedies renders the subject of prescription incompatibilities a
never-ending study, and it is the aim of this course to qualify it.= graduates to keep pace with
discovery.

Textbooks: Ruddiman, Incompatibles in Prescriptions; Diekman and Wimmer, Pharmacy
Notes.

Pharmacy 105— Manufacturing pharmacy laboratory (third year Col-
lege Class). Laboratory course 16 weeks (two sections alternating) 6 hours.
Professors Brown, Dorfman and instructors. 3 points.

The work of this course is a continuation of the work of the second j^ear. Many inorganic and
organic pharmaceutical preparations and salts are manufactured. In addition, galenicals and
toilet preparations are compounded. Furthermore, the student will ascertain the identity of various
chemicals and galenicals.

Textbooks: Pharmacopceia of the United Stales, National Formulary, National Dispensatory;
Diekman and Wimmer, Pharmacy Notes.

Pharmacy 106 — Same as Pharmacy 105, but given during second half of year.

Pharmacy 115-116— Business pharmacy (third-year College Class).
Lectures i >^ hours, Laboratory 1 yi hours. Professor Lascoff, Lecturer Neu-
STAEDTER and visiting lecturers. 4>^ points.

This course will consist of a more detailed development of Pharmacy 5g-6o. The lectures will be
on practical subjects, handled in a manner which will further prepare the student for his require-
ments as a business man.

Lectures by practical business men will be a feature of the course. This series of lectures will
give the student the principles of merchandizing from a business man's viewpoint rather than that
of the pedagogue. These lectures, as well as those of the regular course are aimed to give the
student a better understanding of contemporary business problems.

An additional series of lectures in pharmaceutical jurisprudence is included in this course.

Pharmacy 109-110 — Theoretical pharmacy (third-year University Class).
Lecture 2 hours, Recitation i hour. Professors Wimmer, Carter and instructors.
6 points.

Same as 3rd College.

Pharmacy 111 — Practical pharmacy — manufacturing pliarmacy lab-
oratory (third-year University Class). Laboratory 12 hours per week for 12
weeks beginning September 23, 1929. Professor Carter and instructors. 5
points.

This course includes the manufacture of a number of the more difficult Pharmacopceial and Na-
tional Formulary preparations, as well as of inorganic and organic medicinal remedies. The work
is intended to qualify students for positions in pharmaceutical manufacturing establishments.

Textbook: Wimmer, Manufacturing Pharmacy Notes.

Pharmacy 113 — Practical dispensing pharmacy (third-year University
Class). Laboratory 3 hours per week for 10 weeks beginning September 23, 1929.
Professor Carter and instructors. 2 points.



42 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

This course embraces a thorough study of the various types of incompatibilities. A large number
of prescriptions are compounded which illustrate how some incompatibilities may be avoided or
overcome.

Textbooks: Diekman and Wimmer, Incompaiibiliiies; Ruddiman, Incompatibilities in Pre-
scriptions.

Pharmacy 151-152 — Advanced pharmacy (fourth-year University Class).
Lecture i }4 hours. Professor Wimmer. 3 points.

This course is devoted to a detailed study of pharmaceutical, chemical and biological assay
methods of vegetable and animal drugs, as well as of methods for their identification. It includes
the newer methods employed, such as the standardization of tannin-containing drugs by the ag-
glutination test, of saponin-containing drugs by the determination of their haemolytic indices, etc.

A portion of the lecture course is devoted to a study of essential oils, while especial emphasis
is laid upon official oils. Those of importance in the essential oil industry are included.

In a series of seminars, students are required to prepare and present before the professors and
instructors in the department, papers on current topics of interest pertaining to pharmaceutical
and allied sciences.

Textbooks: Fuller's Analysis oj Drugs and Medicines; U. S. Pharmacopeia; National For-
mulary V; Gildemeister and Hoffman, The Volatile Oils.

Pharmacy 153-154 — Pharmaceutical assaying (fourth-year University
Class). 8 weeks beginning January 27, 1930. Laboratory, 7 hours. Professors
Wimmer, Carter and instructors. 7 points.

This course is intended to prepare the student for work as a drug analyst. The entire class
carries out a proximate analysis of a vegetable drug. Individual problems in assay work of the
most varied and difficult kind are assigned and the student is, to a considerable extent, left to his
own resources. The work embraces assays of galenicals, flavoring extracts, toilet preparations,
cosmetics, medicinal gauzes, etc.

Textbooks: Fuller's Analysis of Drugs and Medicines; 'Nelson's Introduction to the Analysis 0/
Drugs and Medicines; Current Literature.

Chemistry 155-156 — Biological chemistry (for University Seniors). Lec-
tures I hour, 2 points. Dr. Karshan.

The instruction in inorganic and organic analysis relates to the examination of substances dis-
connected from the living body, but the competent analyst must be prepared to consider and
act upon a knowledge of the natural changes which substances undergo when absorbed into the
living body, as well as the natural products there originating.

Chemistry 157-158 — Chemical and general bibliography (for Univer-
sity Seniors). Lectures and conferences, i hour, 2 points. Professors Arny and
Kassner.

This course will consist of lectures on the source books of chemistry, pharmacy, botany and
cognate sciences and on the periodical literature on the same subjects. At the conferences, special
themes will be assigned to each student for research during spare hours.

Coll. 1-2 — English (for University Freshmen). Lectures and recitations, 3
hours, 6 points. Lecturer McJimsey.

This is the Columbia College Course " A1-A2, in English Composition and Literature, " required
of all freshmen at that College.

Coll. 3-4 — American government (for University Freshmen). Lectures
and recitations, 3 hours, 6 points. Lecturer McJimsey.

This is the Columbia College Course Government 1-2 — American Government. It constitutes
a general survey of the most persistent problems of American government — national, state, and



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY



43



local — considering problems of political organization in the first semester, and problems of adminis-
trative organization and personnel, and those related to the functions of finance, justice, the relation
of government to economic life, and foreign relations in the second semester.



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