College of Pharmacy of the City of New York.

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milk, ice, sputum and excreta are given, and methods of disinfection and steriliza-
tion are practically demonstrated.

MacNeal, Pathogenic Micro-organisms.



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 45

SENIOR YEAR

University Class
(N. B. — The work of this year occupies five days weekly)

PROGRAM OF STUDIES

{Forty-eight points)

MM. 151-152. Microscopy of Foods

{Twelve points)

Lecture, 2 hours Professor Ballard

Laboratory, 8 hours Professors Ballard and Hart

Text-books: Winton, Microscopy of Vegetable Foods; Kraemer, Scientific and
Applied Pharmacognosy.

MM. 153-154. Plant Analysis

{Four points)

Laboratory Course, 2 hours Professor Rusby

Text-book: Gray's New Manual of Botany.

MM. 155-156. Human Physiology

(Two points)

Text-book and Conferences Miss Hopping

Chm. 157-158. Inorganic Quantitative Analysis

{Ten points)

Lectures, i hour Professor Hostmann

Laboratory, 8 hours Professors Hostmann and McAdaiis

Text-books: Treadwell and Hall's Quantitative Analysis, sixth edition.
Reference-book, Fresenius' Quantitative Analysis.

Chm. 159-160. Food Analysis and Toxicology

{Ten points)

Lectures, i hour Professor Arny

Laboratory, 8 hours .... Professors Arny and Schaefer and Mr. A. Taub

Text-books: Leach's Food Analysis; Autenrieth-Warren, Detection of Poisons;
Mason, Examination of Water.

Reference-book: Allen's Commercial Analysis.

Chm. 161-162. Biological Chemistry

{Two points)
Lectures, i hour Mr. Karshan



46 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

Phr. 163-164. Higher Pharmacy

(Ten points)

Lectures, i hour Professor Diekman

Recitations, H hour Professor Wimmer

Laboratory, 4 hours Professors Diekman, Wimmer and Brown

Text-book: U. S. Pharmacopoeia, Ninth Revision.

SCHEME OF ATTENDANCE

Lecture Courses, Extending Throughout the Term

Tuesday, 3:00-4:00, Food Analysis and Toxicology (Professor Arny).

Wednesday, 11:00-12:00, Pharmaceutical Assaying (Professor Diekman).

Wednesday, 2:00-3:00, Biological Chemistry (Mr. Karshan).

Wednesday, 3:00-4:00, Physiology (Miss Hopping).

Friday, 9:00-10:00, Inorganic Quantitative Analysis (Professor Hostmann.)

Laboratory Periods

First period: September 15 to November 8, Department of Analytical Chem-
istry.

Second period: November 10 to January 17, Department of Food Analysis.
Third period: January 19 to March 14, Department of Materia Medica.
Fourth period: March 16 to May 9, Department of Pharmacy.

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

Microscopy of Foods (200 hours)

This course comprises lectures and laboratory exercises in the micro-examina-
tion of the various types of foodstuffs. A detailed study is made of one or more
representatives in each of the following groups — cereals, fruit products, confec-
tionery, coffee, tea, chocolate, tomato products and spices. Instruction is en-
tirely individual and the systematic study of these groups Is supplemented by the
examination of commercial samples obtained from market sources and the
College Museum and representing both pure and adulterated materials.

Prerequisites — Courses in botany (MM. 15-16), vegetable histology (MM.
17-18), pharmacognosy (MM. 62, 113-114), bacteriology (MM. 117-118) and
chemistry (Chm. 3-4, 5-6, 51-52, 53-54, 103-104, 107-108) or satisfactory
equivalents of these courses.

Plant Analysis (48 hours)

A good working knowledge of the terms used in descriptive botany, such as can
be gained by a study of Rusby's Manual of Botany, will be found a sufficient
preparation for this course.

Work In this department will be directed toward qualifying the student for the
determination and classification of the flowering plants of any region, by the use
of the analytical flora relating thereto. The first lessons will be devoted to the



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 47

studies of plants of our own region, using Britton's Flora. So far as practicable,
the plants used in illustrations will be those yielding important drugs not official
in the United States Pharmacopoeia, and, therefore, not included in our Senior
Course of study.

References: Bentham and Hooker, Genera Plantarum; Engler and Prantl,
Pflanzenfamilien.

Inorganic Quantitative Analysis (290 hours)

The aim of the fourth-year work in Analytical Chemistry is to carry forward
the instruction in chemical analysis to such a point that the student may be
able to execute the more important sanitary, chemical, and pharmaceutical
analyses.

The object of analytical chemistry is twofold, viz.: qualitative and quantita-
tive. During the first year the detection of the component elements of com-
pounds of unknown composition are studied, while the work of the second and
third years applies to determination of the relative proportional amounts of the
components of the various compounds studied, chiefly by the aid of volumetric
methods, leaving the more difficult and complex processes of gravimetric analysis
to be taken up in the fourth year.

The student must possess the theoretical knowledge necessary to enable him
to solve chemical equations, and to calculate the composition of substances from
their formula and vice versa.

The work will consist chiefly of gravimetric determinations, but will perforce
include the testing, adjusting and calibrating of delicate balances and other
apparatus.

Food Analysis and Toxicology (290 hours)

In order to give every advantage to the instruction in this department during
the fourth year, the College has provided very complete apparatus, which sup-
plies the very best facilities that modern science afford?.

The work in this department will cover the following courses:

1. Analysis of various foodstuffs, including milk, butter, water, flavoring
extracts, etc.

2. Chemical and sanitary examination of water.

3. Isolation and detection of organic and inorganic poisons.

In addition to the laboratory work just outlined there will be a lecture course of
thirty hours extending through the entire year, describing the various chemical
methods of food examination and explaining the principles underlying the more
complex physical instruments employed by the students in their laboratory
course.

Biological Chemistry (32 hours)

The instruction in inorganic and organic analysis relates to the examination of
substances disconnected from the living body, but the competent analyst must
be prepared to consider and act upon a knowledge of the natural changes which
substances undergo when absorbed int6 the living body, as well as the natural
products there originating.



48



COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY



Human Physiology (32 hours)

This course consists of a series of discussions, based on assigned reading, oc-
cupying one hour weekly throughout the term.
Text-book: Howell's Physiology.



Higher Pharmacy (274 hours)

The work in this course consists of a series of lectures and practical laboratory
exercises. It will comprise the manufacture, study and analysis of artificial
foods, such as peptones, meat extracts, albuminates, milk powders, malt powders
and starch powders.

The manufacture and subsequent analysis of flavoring extracts, cosmetics,
medicated gauzes, and other articles of like nature, will receive the attention
which this important subject merits. Proximate vegetable analysis will also be
studied and carried on.

The time assigned for work in the dispensing laboratory will be devoted to the
compounding of difficult prescriptions. Pharmaceutical topics of current interest
will be discussed in a series of weekly seminars.

Synopsis of Work of Each Department for Each Year

First Year College University

Pharmacy lectures 8o hours 8o hours

Pharmacy recitations 48 " 48 "

Pharmacy laboratory 64 " 64 "

Dispensing laboratory 32 " 32 "

General Chemistry (theories, non-metals and light met-
als):

Lectures 64 " 64 "

Recitations 64 " 64 "

Analytical Chemistry (Cations), laboratory 96 " 96 "

General Physics (mechanics, heat, sound, magnetism,
electricity and light) :

Lectures 32 " 32

Recitations 32 " 32

Physics laboratory " 48

Botany lectures. 48 " 48

Botany recitations 32 " 32

Botany laboratory 96 " 96

Posology recitations 16 " 16

Physiology lectures 32 " 32

Physiology recitations 32 " 32

Second Year

Pharmacy lectures 65 " 71

Pharmacy recitations 65 " 71

Pharmacy laboratory 60 " 80



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY



49



College

Dispensing laboratory 30 hours

Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence:

Lectures 10

Pharmaceutical Accounting:

Lectures 32

Laboratory 54

General Chemistry (heavy metals and organic chemistry) :

Lectures 64

Recitations 96

Analytical Chemistry (anions and volumetric) :

Laboratory 96

Toxicology and Materia Medica:

Lectures 64

Recitations 32

Pharmacognosy laboratory 96



University
40 hours



32

54

64
96

96

64
32
96



Third Year

Pharmacy lectures

Pharmacy recitations

Pharmacy laboratory

Dispensing laboratory

Industrial chemistry:
Lectures

Chemical methods. (Physical chemistry and theories of
analysis) :
Lectures

Analytical chemistry. (Advanced volumetric analysis,
gravimetric analysis, pharmacopceial, testing and
assays and urinary analysis)

Chemical bibliography, recitations

Botanical Taxonomy, laboratory

Applied Pharmacognosy, lectures

Applied Pharmacognosy, laboratory

Bacteriology, laboratory



34
34

155
80

68



34



330

34
48
16
64
48



Fourth Year

Pharmacy lectures

Pharmacy recitations

Pharmacy laboratory

Dispensing laboratory

Food analysis, lectures

Chemical methods (gravimetric analysis, etc.) .

Gravimetric analysis, laboratory

Food analysis, laboratory

Water analysis, laboratory

Toxicologic analysis, laboratory



34
8

183
64

34

34
256

138
59
59



50 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

. University

Physiological chemistry, lectures 3^ hours

Botany, plant analysis, laboratory 4^8 "

Human physiology, recitations ^d. "

Food microscopy, lectures 24. "

Food microscopy, laboratory j-g "



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 51

GRADUATE COURSE

The College offers a Graduate Course of two years, leading to the degree of
Doctor of Pharmacy. This course is open to Bachelors of Science in Pharmacy
of this and of other schools maintaining equivalent courses of study based on
equivalent entrance requirements. Candidates must also have qualified in a
modern language to the extent of the first year's work of Columbia College.
Special attention is called to the Isaac Plaut Fellowship, entitling one member
of this class to a year's residence and study at a foreign university.

The object of this course is to fit the Doctor of Pharmacy for the highest forms
of work pertaining to any department of pharmaceutical service; for the manu-
facture of all forms of pharmaceutical and chemical products, for every class of
chemical analysis, biological testing, animal experimentation, and the teaching
of pharmacy and its allied sciences. While certain portions of the work are
obligatory, the course has been specially arranged to provide for elective work in
preparation for that particular department in which the individual student desires
to engage.

The method of work in this course is that followed in courses leading to the
degree of Doctor of Philosophy. Forty hours work weekly is required throughout
the academic year, comprising lectures, conferences, laboratory exercises, and
associated reading. A part of the laboratory work may represent original inves-
tigation. Of the forty hours, ten must be devoted to the work of each of the
three departments, the remaining ten being elective.



FIRST YEAR
Department of Chemistry

Obligatory Work

Chm. 201-202. Structural Organic Ciiemistry. Lectures, 2 hours"
4 points. Professor Arny.

Chm. 203-204. Experimental Organic Chemistry. Laboratory' work,
including combustions and other organic analyses, molecular weight determina-
tions and the preparation of organic compounds. 7 hours. 7 points. Professor
Arny and Schaefer.

Conferences, i hour. 2 points, Professor Arny.

Optional Work

For students electing chemistry as their major subject, ten additional hours
work weekly will be provided. This work may be in any special direction selected
by the student, such as biological chemistry or research work in organic or in-
organic chemistry under the direction of either Professor Arny or Professor

HOSTMANN.



52 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

Department of Materia Medica

Obligatory Work

MM. 205-206 Botanical Taxonomy — Cryptogamic Types. Laboratory,
I hour. I point. Professor Hart.

MM. 207-208. Chemical Microscopy. Laboratory, 2 hours. 2 points.
Professor Ballard.

MM. 209-210. Pathological Examination of Blood, Sputum, etc.
Laborator}', i hour. I point. At College of Physicians and Surgeons.

MM. 211-212. Experimental Physiology. (At College of Physicians and
Surgeons.) Laboratory', 3 hours. 3 points.

!*-■ MM. 213-214. Biological Testing of Drugs. (At College of Physicians
and Surgeons.) Laborator>', 3 hours. 3 points.

Optional Work

For students electing Materia Medica as their major subject, ten hours addi-
tional work will be provided in such special directions as may be selected by the
individual student, such as the taxonomy and comparative composition of
medicinal plants, pharmaco-dynamics, the commerce of drugs and foods, drug
inspection, etc.

Department of Pharmacy

Obligatory Work

Phr. 215-216. Advanced Pharmacy. Lectures, i hour. 2 points. Pro-
fessor DiEKiiAX. Laborator>% 5 hours. 5 points. Professors WniiiER and
Brown. Conference, J^ hour, i point. Professor Wlmmer.

Phr. 217-218. Dispensing Pharraacy. Laboratory, i hour, i point.
Professor Wimmer.

Phr. 219-220. History of Pharmacy. Lectures, i hour. 2 points. Professor

DiEKMAN.

Optional Work

For students electing Pharmacy as their major subject, ten hours additional
work will be provided in such special directions as may be selected by each indi-
vidual student, such as the manufacture and methods of assay of pharmaceutical
preparations, the manufacture of new remedies, methods of standardization of
galenicals, photochemical analysis and colloid-pharmaceutical investigations.

PHARMACEUTICAL EDUCATION

Students intending to prepare themselves for teaching in schools of pharmacy
or in those engaged in similar work are expected to perform all the obligatory
work in each of the three departments as outlined above. The remaining ten
hours per week will be devoted to work at Teachers College of Columbia Univer-
sity, in the subjects of psychology and theory and art of teaching. This work
will comprise the following courses, as outlined in the Announcement of Teachers
College, School of Education.



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 53

255 — ^The Psychology of Thinking. Professor Ruger.

252-B — Psychology of Adolescence. Dr. Hollingworth.

553 — Educational Psychology.

2 — Principles of Teaching. Full course. Professor Borsen.

243-244 — Foundation of Method in Teaching. Professor Kilpatrick,

UNIVERSITY BUSINESS COURSE

With the beginning of the session of 1923-1924, a co-operative course will
be instituted by this College and the Department of University Extensioin
designed especially to fit men and women for managerial or executive positions
in pharmacies and other pharmaceutical establishments. Students applying
for admission to this course are expected to possess a somewhat higher degree
of intellectual maturity than that of the average high school graduate, and it is
specially recommended that they shall have had one or more years of college
training

This class will pursue our regular two-year course leading to the degree of
Graduate in Pharmacy, but members will be excused from such of our work, if
any, as has been performed elsewhere. During a portion of their three free days
per week they will attend the university courses in business listed in the following
schedule. A small additional amount of work, which can be performed in the
evening, will enable them to secure a University Certificate in Business. Upon
the completion of the legal period of practical experience, they may then secure
the pharmacy license.

University Business Course

First Year

Winter Session Spring Session

English eAi — English Composition, 3 Secretarial Correspondence e4, 3

points. points.

Psychology ei — Elements of Psychol- Psychology eiiSa — The Psychology

ogy, 3 points. of Advertising and Selling, 3

Marketing e2i — Principles of Adver- points.

tising, 2 points. Marketing e.22 — Principles of Adver-

Accounting ei — First Year Account- tising, 2 points.

ing, 2 points. Accounting e2 — First Year Account-
ing, 2 points.

Second Year

JLaw eb3 — Business Law, 2 points. Economics eij — Elements of Bu si-
Marketing e3i (Salesmanship), 2 ness Administration, 2 points.

points. English ei3 — Oral English, 2 points.

Marketing e2 5— Practical Advertising Economics ei8 — Elements of Busi-

Writing, 2 points. ness Administration, 2 points.

Law eb4 — Business Law, 2 points. English ei4 — Oral English, 2 points.



54 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

Marketing 64 — Problems of Retail

Merchandising, 2 points.
Marketing e24a — Advertising Display,

2 points.

Fees

The College fee will be the regular fee for the College Course. The fee for
the Business Courses will be at the regular University rate of $8 a point.

SUMMER LABORATORY AND QUIZ COURSES

These courses are designed to assist students who have failed at the spring
examinations to prepare for those of the fall, and to provide instruction for
special students in the use of the microscope, in the examination of drugs and in
pharmaceutical processes.

It will thus be seen that the work is not definitely fixed, but is made sufficiently
elastic to allow it to be adapted to the special needs of individuals,

SUMMER LABORATORY COURSES, 1924

Fees: Twenty-five Dollars for each subject.

June 9 to June 28 — Analytical Chemistry and Physics.

June 30 to July 19 — Histology and Pharmacognosy.

July 21 to August 9 — Pharmacy and Dispensing Pharmacy.

SUMMER QUIZ COURSES, 1924

Fees: Fifteen Dollars for each subject.

These courses will be held during the period from August 18 to September 9.
First-year students will attend on Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, and second-
year students on Monday, Wednesday and Friday. The schedule of hours for
each day will be as follows:

First Year Second Year

9 a. m.-io a. m. Botany 9 a. m.-io a. m. Materia Medica

10 a. m.-ii a. m. Physiology 10 a. m.-ll a. m. Toxicology

11 a. m.- I p. m. Chemistry 11 a. m.- i p. m. Pharmacy
2 p. m.- 4 p. m. Pharmacy 2 p. m.- 4 p. m. Chemistry

4 p. m.- 5 p. m. Physics 4 p. m.- 5 p. m. Dispensing Pharmacy

EVENING COURSES

These courses of instruction, as reorganized, have been largely attended.
Although they cannot be substituted for any of our regular work, leading to
degrees, they have proven of great benefit to those who cannot attend instruction
during the daytime and to those who desire to pursue special courses of study.
General educational credits are not allowed for them. They are designed for
special students as well as for members of our regular classes. Certificates will
be awarded to those who attend at least 80 per cent of all of the exercises of the



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 55

course for which they register and who, in addition, receive a satisfactory grade
in a final examination. Students may be admitted at any time at the discretion
of the instructor in charge. A registration fee of $6.00 is required of each student.
The courses are given on three evenings of each week from Monday, September
29, 1924, to Friday, May i, 1925. Students may pursue more than one of the
courses offered during the same semester. Fees are payable in advance and are
not returnable. The following courses of instruction are offered :

Chemistry, Phr. 20-e — Pharmaceutical Qualitative Analysis, i hour
classroom and 2 hours' laboratory each week. Fee, $16 each session. Mr.
Macsata and assistant.

7:30-10:30 p. m., Friday.

Lecture, 7:30-8:20 p. m.

Laboratory, 8:30-10:30 p. m.

This course, which presupposes a knowledge of general pharmaceutical chemistry is designed
to train students in the qualitative tests for metal-ions included in the United States Pharma-
copceia.

Deposit for breakage, $10.

Chemistry, Phr. 21-e — Pharmaceutical Qualitative Analysis, i hour
classroom and 2 hours' laboratory work each week. Fee, $16 each session. Mr.
Macsata and assistant.

7:00-10:00 p. m., Friday.

Laboratory, 7:00-9:00 p. m.

Lecture, 9:30-10:00 p. m.

This course is a continuation of 20-e with particular reference to the U. S. P. tests for acid-ions.

Fee for breakage, $10.

Chemistry, Phr. 22-e — Pharmaceutical Volumetric Analysis, i hour
classroom and 2 hours' laboratory work. Fee, $16 each session. Professor
McAdams and assistant.

7:00-10:30 p. m., Friday.

This course is designed to give training in the volumetric assays of the United States Pharma-
copoeia.

Laboratory fee, $5 per session.
Deposit for breakage, $10.

Chemistry, Phr. 24-e — Examination of Urine, i hour lecture and 2
hours' laboratory work. Fee, $16. Professor Hostmann, Professor McAdams
and assistant.

7:15-10:30 p. m., Friday.

Lecture, 7:20-8:20 p. m., Friday

Laboratory, 8:30-10:30 p. m., Friday.

In this course the qualitative and quantitative chemical tests of normal and pathological urine
are studied; also the preparation and standardization of the necessary reagents.

Laboratory fee, $5.
Deposit for breakage, $10.



56 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

Chemistry, Phr. 25-e— Examination of Urine, i hour lecture and 2
hours' laboratory work. Fee, $16. Professor Hostmann, Professor McAdams
and assistant.

7:30-10:30 p. m., Friday.

Lecture, 7:30-8:20 p. m., Friday.

Laboratory, 8:20-10:15 p. m., Friday.

In this course, a continuation of 24-e, the gravimetric, polariscopic. colorimetric and microscopic
examination of urine is studied.

Laboratory fee, $5.

Deposit for breakage, $10.

Chemistry, Phr. 26-e — Chemical Examination of Water, i hour lecture
and 2 hours' laboratory work a week. Fee, $16. Professor ScHAEFER and
assistant.

7:30-10:30 p. m., Friday.

Lecture, 7:30-8:20 p. m., Friday.

Laboratory, 8:30-10:30 p. m., Friday.

Instruction is given in the qualitative and quantitative chemical examination of water; the
proper collection of samples and the interpretation of results.

Laboratory fee, $10.
Deposit for breakage, $10.

Chemistry, Phr. 27-e — Chemical Examination of Milk, i hour lecture
and 2 hours' laboratory work a week. Fee, $16. Professor Schaefer and
assistant.

7:30-10:30 p. m., Friday.

Lecture, 7:30-8:20 p. m., Friday.

Laboratory, 8:30-10:30 p. m., Friday.

This course is designed to train the student in the principles of routine "sanitary" milk analysis.

Laboratory fee, $10.

Deposit for breakage, $10.

Pharmacy, Phr. 10-e — Elementary Pharmacy, i hour lecture and 2
hours' laboratory work each week. Fee, $16 each session. Special laboratory
fee, I5 each session. Professor Brown and assistant.

7:30-10:30 p. m., Tuesday.

This course is of value to those employed in pharmaceutical laboratories. Pharmaceutical
operations as well as dispensing practices are studied and carried out.

Pharmacy, Phr. 11-e— Advanced Pharmacy, i hour lecture and 2 hours'
laboratory work each week. Fee, $16 and special laboratory fee, S8 each session.
Professor Brown and assistant.

7:30-10:30 p. m.

In the winter session instruction is given in the manufacture of the more difficult medicinal
preparations, such as the compressed tablets, medicated gauzes, ampouls, etc. During the spring
session methods of analysis for such preparations and galenicals in general are studied and carried
out.



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 57

Pharmacy, Phr. 12-e — ^Manufacturing Pharmacy. 2 hours lectures and
I hour laboratory work each week. Fee, $20 and special laboratory fee, $5 each
session. Professor Wimmer and assistants.

7:30-10:30 p. m., Tuesday.

This course is of value to those desiring to prepare and place upon the market lines of specialties.
The course is elastic and designed to meet individual requirements. One may take up the study
of an entire series of preparations, or any one preparation in considerable detail.

Pharmacy, Phr. 14-e — Manufacture of Cosmetics and Perfumes. 2

hours' lectures and i)^ hours' laboratory work each week. Fee, $24 and $5
special laboratory fee each session. Professor Wimmer and assistants.

7:30-10:30 p. m., Tuesday. Main lecture room, Pharmacy.

This course affords a thorough review of the entire subject of cosmetics and perfumes, their
composition and manufacture. Face lotions, hair dyes and other hair preparations, face powders



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