College of Pharmacy of the City of New York.

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This course is devoted to a detailed study of pharmaceutical, chemical and biological assay
methods of vegetable and animal drugs, as well as of methods for their identification. It includes
the newer methods employed, such as the standardization of tannin-containing drugs by the ag-
glutination test, of saponin-containing drugs by the determination of their haemolytic indices, etc.

A portion of the lecture course is devoted to a study of essential oils, while especial emphasis
is laid upon official oils. Those of importance in the essential oil industry are included.

In a series of seminars, students are required to prepare and present before the professors and
instructors in the department, papers on current topics of interest pertaining to pharmaceutical
and allied sciences.

Textbooks: Fuller, Analysis 0/ Drugs and Medicines; U. S. Pharmacopoeia; National For-
mulary V; Gildemeister and Hoffman, The Volatile Oils.

Pharmacy 153-154 — Pharmaceutical assaying (fourth-year University
Class). 8 weeks beginning January 26, 1930. Laboratory, 7 hours. Professors
Wimmer, Carter and instructors. 7 points.

This course is intended to prepare the student for work as a drug analyst. The entire class
carries out a proximate analysis of a vegetable drug. Individual 'problems in assay work of the
most vEiried and difficult kind are assigned and the student is, to a considerable extent, left to his
own resources. The work embraces assays of galenicals, flavoring extracts, toilet preparations,
cosmetics, medicinal gauzes, etc.

Textbooks: Fuller, Analysis oj Drugs and Medicines; Nelson, Introduction to the Analysis of
Drugs and Medicines; Current Literature.



CULTURAL COURSES

College 1-2 — English (for University freshmen). Lectures and recitations, 3
hours, 6 points. Mr. McJimsey.

This is the Columbia College course A1-A2, in English composition and literature, required
of all freshmen at that College.

College 3-4 — American government (for University freshmen). Lectures
and recitations, 3 hours, 6 points. Mr. McJimsey.

This is the Columbia College course Government 1-2, American government. It constitutes
a general survey of the most persistent problems of American government — national, state, and
local — considering problems of political organization in the first semester, and problems of adminis-
trative organization and personnel, and those related to the functions of finance, justice, the relation
of government to economic life, and foreign relations in the second semester.



44 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

College 51-52 — German (for University sophomores). Lectures and recita-
tions, 5 hours, 10 points. Mr. Ingenhuett.
This is an introductory course in German.

College 101-102 — Mathematics (for University juniors). 3 hours, 6 points.
Mr. McJiMSEY.

This course comprises the Columbia College course Mathematics Ai, trigonometry and A6r,
solid geometry.

THE GRADUATE COURSE

A graduate course of two full years' study in residence, is open to graduates
with the baccalaureate degree, conferred by this college or other schools of
pharmacy maintaining equivalent courses of study. For the present, we are
able to accommodate only two students majoring in each of the Departments of
Chemistry, Materia Medica, and Pharmacy. Thirty hours' study weekly is
required in the department in which the student is majoring, and three hours
weekly in each of the other two departments. In the latter departments, certain
work is obligatory, although an option is allowed the student, between two or
more schedules, as follows:

CHEMISTRY

Fifth Year

Option A — Lecture courses consisting of Chemistry 201-202 — Structural
organic chemistry. 2 hours. 4 points. Professor Arny.

Chemistry 203-204 — Synthesis of newer organic medicinal chemicals.

I hour. 2 points. Professor Schaefer.

Option B — Laboratory work. Chemistry 205 — Experimental organic
chemistry. 2 periods weekly at 6 hours each during 8 weeks. 3 points. Pro-
fessors Arny and Taub.

This course includes combustions and other organic analyses, molecular weight determinations
and other such work as time permits.

Sixth Year

Option A — The same lecture courses offered to students of the fifth year, pro-
vided such courses have not already been offered as fifth year subjects.

Option B — Chemistry 207 — Advanced organic analysis. 2 periods of
6 hours weekly during 8 weeks. 3 points. Professor Kassner.

This course includes modern methods of organic radicles; the quantitative determination of
elements and radicles not performed in previous years; and lastly, time permitting, special
analytical methods such as electrometric titrations and the polarimetry of complex mixtures.

MATERIA medica

Fifth Year

Option A — Materia Medica 201 — Analysis and determination of cryp-
togamous and phanerogamous plants. Laboratory course, two periods
weekly of 6 hours each, during 8 weeks. 3 points. Professors RusBY and Hart.



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY



45



Option B— Materia Medica 203^Advanced bacteriology. Laboratory
and conferences, 2 periods weekly of 6 hours each during 8 weeks. 3>^ points.
Professor Hart.

The determination of types through special cultural and staining methods.

Option C — Materia Medica 205 — Food microscopy. Laboratory and
conferences, 2 periods weekly of 6 hours each, during 8 weeks. 3>^ points.
Professor Ballard.

A systematic study of the various classes of foodstuffs in which adulteration can be determined
by microscopical methods.

Sixth Year

Option A — {To be offered only if Option A of the fifth year has been carried. If
not, that work will constitute Option A of the sixth year.) Materia Medica 207 —
The literature and methods of research in vegetable taxonomy. Con-
ference and laboratory, two periods weekly of 6 hours each during 8 weeks.
3/^ points. Professors RusBY and Hart.

Option B — Materia Medica 209 — Bacteriology. Conference and laboratory,
2 periods weekly of 6 hours each during 8 weeks. 3>^ points. Professor Hart.

The preparation of antitoxic products in media and their cultivation through animal ex-
perimentation.

Option C — Materia Medica 211 — Chemical microscopy. Conference and
laboratory, 2 periods weekly of 6 hours each during 8 weeks. 2,^2 points. Pro-
fessors Ballard and Taub.

A study of the microchemical procedures involved in the use of the microscope as an aid in
chemical analysis.

PHARMACY

Fifth Year

Option A — Pharmacy 201 — Assay and analysis of official and non-
official galenicals and other medicinally compounded preparations.

Lectures and laboratory work. 2 periods weekly of 6 hours each during 8 weeks
.3K points. Professor Wimmer.

Option B — Pharmacy 203 — Manufacture, composition and analysis of
toilet preparations and cosmetics. Lectures and laboratory work. 2 periods
weekly of 6 hours each during 8 weeks. 3>^ points. Professor Wimmer.

Sixth Year

Option A — Pharmacy 205 — Examination and analysis of incompatible
mixtures with special reference to prescriptions. Laboratory work only.
2 periods weekly of 6 hours each during 8 weeks. 3^2 points. Professor Wimmer.

Option B — Pharmacy 207 — Examination and analysis of essential oils,
flavoring extracts and perfume materials. Lecture and laboratory work.
2 periods weekly of 6 hours each during 8 weeks. 3>^ points. Professor Wimmer.



46 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

SUBMISSION OF THESIS

At least fifteen days before the first day on which University examinations
are scheduled to be held, the candidate shall submit three finished copies of his
or her thesis, in typewritten form, to the professor in whose department the
candidate is majoring.

The awarding of the degree shall be dependent upon the approval of the
thesis, and the results of an oral Faculty examination of the candidate.

SUMMER LABORATORY COURSES

These courses are designed to assist students who have failed at the spring
examinations to prepare for those of the fall, and to provide instruction for
special students in the use of the microscope, in the examination of drugs and
in pharmaceutical processes.

It will thus be seen that the work is not definitely fixed, but is made sufficiently
elastic to allow it to be adapted to the special needs of individuals.

In the laboratory work, apparatus and material will be furnished without
charge. All broken, lost, or injured apparatus must be either replaced, or the
expense of such injury be borne by the student.

SUMMER LABORATORY COURSES I93O

First-, Second- and Third- Year College Classes

June 9 to June 28 — Department of Chemistry.
June 30 to July 19 — Department of Materia Medica,
July 21 to August 9 — Department of Pharmacy.

SUMMER LABORATORY COURSES 193I

First-, Second- and Third Year College Classes

June 8 to June 27 — Department of Chemistry.

June 29 to July 18 — Department of Materia Medica.

July 20 to August 8 — Department of Pharmacy.

UNIVERSITY CLASSES

University students failing in laboratory courses will be advised by the Registrar
regarding the summer laboratory schedules.

EVENING COURSES

These courses of instruction, although they cannot be substituted for any of
our regular work leading to degrees, have proven of great benefit to those who
cannot attend during the day, and to those who desire to pursue special courses
of study. General educational credits are not allowed for them. They are de-
signed for special students as well as for members of our regular classes.

Candidates may be admitted at any time during the course, at the discretion



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY



47



of the director of the course, but only those who have attended at least 80 per
cent of all exercises and who pursue the courses for which they are registered in
a satisfactory manner, will receive certificates.

The courses are ofifered on Monday, Tuesday and Friday of each week during
the periods from Monday, October 6, 1930 to January 16, 1931 and from
January 19, 1931 to Friday, May 8, 1931.

The Registrar's office will be open daily for registration from 10 a. m. to 4
p. m. and on Monday, Tuesday and Friday evenings from 7 to 8 o'clock, during
the first two weeks of each semester.

Fees are payable in advance and are not returnable. A registration fee of $6
is required of each student in addition to the fees stated below.

In the laboratory work, apparatus and material will be furnished without
charge. All broken, lost, or injured apparatus must be either replaced, or the
expense of such injury be borne by the student.

The following courses are offered:

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY

Evening Chemistry l-2^Pharmaceutical qualitative analysis, i hour
classroom and 2 hours laboratory each week. Fee $25 each semester, $10 breakage
deposit. Professor Schaefer and Mr. Jayne.

7:30-10:30 p. m., Friday.

Lecture, 7:30-8:20 p. m. Friday.

Laboratory, 8:30-10:30 p. m. Friday.

This course, which presupposes a knowledge of general pharmaceutical chemistry is designed
to train students in the qualitative tests for metal-ions included in the United States Pharma-
copoeia. (Conditional on the enrollment of ten students.)

Evening Chemistry 3-4 — Pharmaceutical qualitative analysis, i hour
classroom and 2 hours laboratory work each week. Fee $25 each semester, $10
breakage deposit. Professor Schaefer and Mr. Jayne.

7-10 p. m., Friday.

Laboratory, 7-9 p. m. Friday.

Lecture, 9:10-10 p. m. Friday.

This course is a continuation of Evening Chemistry 1-2 with particular reference to the U. S. P.
tests for acid-ions. (Conditional on the enrollment of ten students.)

Evening Chemistry 5-6 — Pharmaceutical volumetric analysis, i hour
classroom and 2 hours laboratory work. Fee $25 each semester, $10 breakage
deposit. Professor Schaefer and Mr. Jayne.

7-10:30 p. m., Friday.

This course is designed to give training in the volumetric assays of the United States Pharma-
copcEia. (Conditional on the enrollment of ten students.)

Evening Chemistry 7 — Examination of urine. First semester, i hour
lecture and 2 hours laboratory work. Fee $25, $10 breakage deposit. Professor
Schaefer and Mr. Jayne.

7:15-10:30 p. m., Friday.

Lecture, 7:20-8:20 p. m., Friday.

Laboratory, 8:30-10:30 p. m., Friday.



48 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

It should be noted that to qualify for "Director" of a laboratory, as defined by the Board of
Health of the City of New York, a degree at least the equivalent of a B.S., is required.

In this course the qualitative and quantitative chemical tests of normal and pathological urine
are studied; also the preparation and standardization of the necessary reagents. (Conditional
upon the enrollment of twenty students.)

Evening Chemistry 8 — Examination of urine. Second semester iK
hours lecture and 2 hours laboratory work. Fee §25, $10 breakage deposit. Pro-
fessor ScHAEFER and Mr. Jayne.

7:30-10 p. m., Friday.

Lecture, 7:30-8 p. m., Friday.

Laboratory, 8:20-10 p. m., Friday.

In this course, a continuation of Evening Chemistry 7. the gravimetric, polariscopic, colon-
metric and microscopic examination of lu-ine is studied. (Conditional upon the enrollment of
twenty students.)

Evening Chemistry 9-10 — Newer remedies, i hour lecture each week
throughout the year. Fee S30. Professor Schaefer.
8:30-9:30 p. m., Frida3\

The aim of this course is to give the graduate pharmacist an opportunity to become familiar
with the chemistry of many "recent" remedies generally classified as "synthetics" which are
prescribed by physicians but which are not official. Most of these preparations are rather recent
additions to our materia medica and many of them are covered by patents. The products are not
selected because of their medicinal merit but rather because of the frequency vnih which they are
prescribed. Not only will the chemistry of these preparations be considered, but whenever pos-
sible, original packages will be shown to the students and the names of their manufacturers given.

(Conditional on enrollment of twenty students.)



DEPARTMENT OF MATERIA MEDICA

Evening Materia Medica 1-2 — Principles and practice of bacteriology.

I hour lecture and 2 hours laboratory work each week. Fee $40 each semester,
$10 breakage deposit. Professor Hart and assistants.

7-10 p. m., Tuesday. Lectures, 7-8 p. m. Room 42, Pharmacy.

Laboratory, 8-10 p. m.

This course includes the bacterial examination of sputum, excreta, water, air, milk and ice.

Special attention is given to the standard methods of disinfection and steriUzation. The major
portion of the time is devoted to the cultivation, morphology and staining properties leading to the
identification of the more common pathogenic bacteria. (Conditional on the enrollment of ten
students.)

Evening Materia Medica 3-4- — Blood analysis, i hour lecture and 2 hours
laboratory work each week. Fee $40 each semester, $10 breakage deposit. Pro-
fessor H. Taub and assistants.

7-10 p. m., Monday. Lecture, 7-8 p. m.

Laboratory, 8-10 p. m.

First semester: Preparation and study of blood smears in health and disease; total and differen-
tial counts; special pathology.

Second semester: Blood chemistry, including non-protein and urea nitrogen determinations,
sugar, creatinin, uric add, CO2 — combining power, chlorides, calcium, cholesterol, and other con-
stituents; hemoglobin estimation, coagulation time; establishing and operating a laboratory.
( Conditional on the enrollment of ten students.)



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY



49



Evening Materia Medica 6 — Parasitology, i hour lecture and 2 hours
laboratory work each week, second semester. Fee $40, Sio breakage deposit.
Professor Hart and assistants.

7-10 p. m., Tuesday.

In this course chief attention is given to changes from normal to abnormal blood due to parasites
as well as the more pathogenic blood and intestinal parasites.

Time is also allotted to the mycology of foods. (Conditional on the enrollment of 10 nudents.)

Evening Materia Medica 7-8 — Microbiology. i hour of lecture and
demonstration each week throughout the year. Fee $30. Professor Hart.
7:30-8:30 p. m., Monday.

This course includes the methods of manufacture, standardi2ation, administration and dosage
of the commercial biological and bacteriological products and derivatives. Consideration is like-
wise given to the various methods of sterilization and disinfection as well as the principles of
serology and immunology. (Conditional on enrollment of twenty students.)

Evening Materia Medica 9-10 — Pharmacal sundries. i hour lecture
each week throughout the year. Fee $30. Professor B.allard.
8:30-9:30 p. m., Monday.

While the retail pharmacist handles many items which are included under the general heading of
sick-room supplies, he generally has Httle opportunity for systematic study of these articles and
this is particularly true under present-day conditions. The object of this course of lectures is to
acquaint him with the manufacture, differences and applications of bandaging and dressing mater-
ials, rubber sundries, glass and metal appliances, sutures and ligatures and the miscellaneous articles
stocked in the average retail pharmacy and intended for physicians' or household use. The com-
plicated and specialized types of surgical instruments and appliances will not be considered.
(Conditional on enrollment of twenty students.)

DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY

Evening Pharmacy 1-2 — Manufacturing pharmacy. iK hours lectures
and i}4 hours laboratory work each week. Fee S35 each semester. Professor
Brown and assistants.

7:30-10:30 p. m., Tuesday.

This course is of value to those desiring to prepare and place upon the market lines of specialties.
The course is elastic and designed to meet indi%ndual requirements. One may take up the study
of an entire series of preparations, or any one preparation in considerable detail. (Conditional
upon the enrollment of ten students.)

Evening Pharmacy 3-4 — Manufacture of cosmetics and toilet prep-
arations. I hour lecture and 2 hours laboratory work each week. Fee $35
each semester. Professor WiMiiER and assistants.

7:30-10:30 p. m., Tuesday. Main lecture room, Pharmacy.

This course affords a thorough review of the entire subject of cosmetics and toilet preparations,
their composition and manufacture. Face lotions, hair dyes and other hair preparations, face pow-
ders and paints, cream (greasy, non-greasy and vanishing), toothwashes and powders, etc., are
studied and certain types are manufactured. (Conditional upon the enrollment of ten students.)

A summary of the lecture topics will be furnished upon request.

Evening Pharmacy 5-6 — Perfume materials and perfumery, i hour

lecture and 2 hours laboratory work each week. Fee, $50 each semester. Pro-
fessor WiMMER and assistants.

7 p. m., Monday. Main Lecture Hall.



50 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

This course is of value to persons employed in essential oil houses and perfume manufacturing
establishments and others desiring to enter this field. The lectures are illustrated with lantern
slides and samples of the materials under discussion are exhibited. The laboratory work comprises
the determination of physical constants, testing for impurities, etc. A systematic course in nose-
training is included.

A summary of the course will be mailed upon request. (Conditional on the enrollment of ten
students.)

Evening Pharmacy 7-8 — Ampuls and medicated units, i hour lecture
each week. Fee $30 entire course. Professor Carter.
7:30-8:30 p. m., Fridaj-.

This course pro\ides for the graduate pharmacist a thorough training in the principles of ampul
medication both from the theoretical and practical \'iewpoints. Briefly, it considers the historj-,
the advantages of parenteral administrarion, the forms and sizes of ampuls of American and foreign
makes, together with the actual demonstration of ampul manufacture including glass blo-wing,
fiUing, sealing, steriUzation, etc. The National Formulary ampuls and products of various manu-
facturers are exhibited and discussed in detail paj-ing strict attention to methods of packaging,
storing and dispensing. (Conditional upon the enrollment of twenty students.)



I



Harry Taub



GUSTAVE BaRDFELD



THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION OF THE COLLEGE OF
PHARMACY OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK

OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES, I93O-I93I

President
Frederick D. Lascoff

Honorary President

Adolph Henning

Vice-Presidents

Hugo H. Schaefer

Secretary

Abraham Taub

Treasurer

George C. Diekman

Registrar

Curt P. Wimmer

Executive Board

May O'C. Davis, 1932.
F. J. PoKORNY, 1932.
Rudolf Hauck, 1933.
Arthur J. Bauer, 1933.
ViTO Calcagno, 1933.



Lewis N. Brown, 1931.
John H. Hecker, 193 i.
Leslie Jayne, 1931.
V. K. Commons, 1932.



C. P. Wimmer



Committee on Papers and Queries
Adolph Henning



John H. Hecker



Delegates to the American Pharmaceutical Association
George C. Diekman C. P. Wimmer Adolph Henning

Delegates to the New York State Pharmaceutical Association
Charles W. Ballard Hugo H. Schaefer Vito Calcagno

Delegates to the New Jersey Pharmaceutical Association
Harold McAdams Charles W. Holton Harry E. Bischoff

Delegates to the Conjiecticut Pharmaceutical Association
Curt P. Wimmer Harold Levy Frank V. Damtoft

51



52 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

ENDOWMENTS

For one hundred consecutive years the College of Pharmacy of the City of
New York has maintained its annual courses of instruction for the education
and training of pharmacists. That this instruction has exhibited a steady ex-
tension and improvement is clearly recorded in the successive editions of its
annual prospectus. That such a result could not have been attained by the use
of students' fees, unaided by other resources, will be readily understood by all
who have had experience in educational adm.inistration. Such assistance may
be said to have begun with the generous contribution of free instruction services
by Professors Edward R. Squibb, Charles F. Chandler and others, in the early
history of the institution, and to have continued ^^-ith the services of their suc-
cessors, and the unpaid management of officers and Trustees. At various times
financial crises have been met by generous donations of money by officers and
members, and occasionally by outside friends. In some cases, as when new
quarters were to be secured, a new building was to be erected, or herbarium or
apparatus to be bought, the sums thus contributed have been large, considering
the resources of those contributing.

As indicated in the preceding pages of this Announcement, in addition to the
College Course of three j-ears, leading to the degree of Ph.G., there is now pro-
vided a University Course of three years, leading to the degree of Ph.Ch., with an
additional year of optional work, leading to the degree of B.S. in Pharmacy.

It is not to be expected that the scanty revenue derived from the fees of the
small number of students who will pursue these advanced studies will begin to
provide the necessary means for meeting the additional expenditures. The Col-
lege must undertake these burdens as its contribution to pharmaceutical educa-
tion.

Under such conditions, it is felt that an appeal should be made to those who
are interested in promoting educational development in America to give their
favorable consideration and to lend their financial aid to the present efforts of
the College.

Since the actual instruction work of the College calls for the expenditures of our
entire income received from students' fees, it follows that we are compelled, like
other schools, to seek other sources of income for meeting unusual expenses.

There are also a number of ways in which comparatively small contributions
will be immediately productive of great good in specific directions, and several
of these are discussed below.

LIBRARY MAINTENANCE

The library facilities required by men engaged in advanced studies are neces-
sarily much more extensive than those now provided by the College. The re-
search work in which such men will engage will call for a full supply- of works of
reference, not only in pharmaceutical subjects, but in the sciences contributory
to pharmacy. Generous friends of the College, and one such in particular, have
made frequent and extensive contributions to the librarj', but it is highly desir-
able that an endowment be established that will yield a permanent annual fund
of $500 for such a purpose.



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 53

APPARATUS

The College, thanks to the generosity of the late Mr. Edward Kemp, possesses
a splendid working equipment of physical apparatus, suitable for the ordinary
purposes of pharmaceutical education. The advanced work of graduate students



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