College of Pharmacy of the City of New York.

College of pharmacy of the City of New York (Volume 1924/25-1930/31) online

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Section i


Section 2


Section 3


Section 4


9-10


Chemistry Quiz


Mat. Med. Quiz


Chemistry Quiz


Mat. Med. Quiz


lO-I


Laboratory


Laboratory


Laboratory


Laboratory


2-3


Pharmacy Lect.


Pharmacy Lect.


Pharmacy Lect.


Pharmacy Lect.


3-4


Chemistry Lect.


Chemistry Lect.


Chemistry Lect.


Chemistrj' Lect.


4-5


Accounting


Accounting


Accounting


Accounting


5-6


Accounting


Accounting


Accounting


Accounting






Lecture Group B






Section 5


Section 6


Section 7


Section 8


9-10


Pharmacy Lect.


Pharmacy Lect.


Pharmacy Lect.


Pharmacy Lect.


lO-I


Laboratory'


Laboratory


Laboratory


Laboratory


2-3


Mat. Med. Quiz


Chemistry Quiz


Mat. Med. Quiz


Chemistry Quiz


3-4


Mat. Med. Quiz


Chemistry' Quiz


Chemistry Quiz


Mat. Med. Quiz


4-5


Chemistry Lect.


Chemistry Lect.


Chemistry Lect.


Chemistry Lect.


5-6


Chemistry Quiz


Mat. Med. Quiz


Pharmacy Quiz


Pharmacy Quiz






Friday








Lecture Group A






Section i


Section 2


Section 3


Section 4


9-10


Chemistry Lect.


Chemistry Lect.


Chemistry Lect.


Chemistry Lect.


lO-I


Laboratory


Laboratory


Laboratory


Laboratory'


2-3


Mat. Med. Quiz


Pharmacy Quiz


Chemistry Quiz


Chemistry Quiz


3-4


Pharmacy Quiz


Chemistry Quiz


Mat. Med. Quiz


Pharmacy Quiz


4-5


Pharmacy Lect.


Pharmacy Lect.


Pharmacy Lect.


Pharmacy Lect.


5-6


Chemistry Quiz


Mat. Med. Quiz


Pharmacy Quiz


Mat. Med. Quiz






Lecture Group B






Section 5


Section 6


Section 7


Section 8


9-10


Pharmacy Quiz


Pharmacy Quiz


Mat. IMed. Quiz


Chemistry Quiz


lO-I


Laboratory


Laboratory


Laboratory


Laboratory


2-3


Chemistry Lect.


Chemistry Lect.


Chemistry Lect.


Chemistry Lect.


3-4


Pharmacy Lect.


Pharmacy Lect.


Pharmacy Lect.


Pharmacy Lect.


4-5


Accounting


Accounting


Accounting


Accounting


5-6


Accounting


Accounting


Accounting


Accounting



84



COLUMBIA U NIVERSIRY



SECOND YEAR LABORATORY SCHEDULE

For the purposes of laboratory work, the entire second year class is divided into
three divisions, designated X, Y and Z.

Monday
Division X Division Y

lO-l Pharmacognosy Dispensing*

Wednesday
lO-i Dispensing* Chemistry

Friday
lo-i Chemistry Pharmacognosy Dispensing*

* During first Semester only; Pharmacy takes its place during the second Semester.



Division Z
Chemistry

Pharmacognosy



ACADEMIC CALENDAR

1924
Sept. 10-12. Supplementary Examinations.

15. Monday, Ninety-fifth Session begins Second, Third and Fourth-Year

Classes assemble 9 a. m.

16. Tuesday, First Year Classes assemble 9 a. m.

22. Monday, Evening Special Course Classes assemble 7:30 p. m.
Nov. 4. Tuesday, Election Day, Holiday.

27. Thursday, to November 29, Saturday, inclusive, Thanksgiving
Holidays.
Dec. 22. Monday, to

1925
Jan. 4. Sunday, inclusive, Christmas Holidays.
5. Monday, Sessions resumed.
12-17. Mid- Year Examinations.
Feb. 12. Thursday, Lincoln's Birthday, Holiday.

23. Monday, Washington's Birthday, Holiday.

Apr. 6. Monday, Last Day for applying for final examinations.
May I. Friday, Evening Courses close.

2-1 1. Final College Course Examinations.
18-21. Final University Course Examinations.

20. Wednesday, First Year Class Exercises (Alumni Day).

21. Thursday, College Commencement.
June 3. Wednesday, University Commencement.
June 8-Aug. 8. Summer Laboratory Courses.
Aug. 17-Sept. 5. Summer Quiz Courses.

SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS
Supplementary Examinations

1924 First Year

July 18. Friday, 2-5, Histology.
Sept. 10. Wednesday, 9-12, Pharmacy and Latin.
Wednesday, 2-5, Dispensing Pharmacy.
ir. Thursday, 9-12, Botany, Physiology, Posology.

Thursday, 2-5, Chemistry.
12. Friday, 9-12, Analytical Chemistry.
Friday, 2-5, Physics.

Second Year
July 18. Friday, 2-5, Macro- and Micro-Pharmacognosy.
Sept. 10 Wednesday, 9-12, Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence.

Wednesday, 2-5, Dispensing Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Accounting.

85



Sept.


10.




II.




12.




12.


1925




Jan.


13-



86 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

11. Thursday, 9-12, Materia Medica, Toxicology.
Thursday, 2-5, Pharmaceutical Chemistry.

12. Friday, 9-12, Analytical Chemistry.
Friday, 2-5, Organic Chemistry.

Third Year
Wednesday, 9-12, Department of Pharmacy.
Thursday, 9-12, Department of Materia Medica.
Friday, 9-12, Analytical Chemistry.
Friday, 2-5, Industrial Chemistry.

Mid- Year Examinations

First Year
Tuesday, 9-1, Botany, Physiology.
Tuesday, 2-5, Posology, Botany Laboratory.

15. Thursday, 9-12 Pharmacy.
Thursday, 2-5, Dispensing Pharmacy.

17. Saturday, 9-1, Physics, Chemistry.
Saturday, 2-5, Analytical Chemistry.

Second Year

Jan. 12. Monday, 9-12, Materia Medica, Toxicology.

Monday, 2-5, Macroscopic and Microscopic Pharmacognosy.
14. Wednesday, 9-12, Analytical Chemistry.
Wednesday, 2-5, Pharmaceutical Chemistry

16. Friday, 9-12, Pharmacy.
Friday, 1-3, Dispensing Pharmacy.
Friday, 3-5, Accounting.

Final Examinations

First Year College Class

1925
May 2. Saturday, 2-5, Dispensing Pharmacy.
5. Tuesday, 9-12, Botany, Physiology.
Tuesday, 2-5, Analytical Chemistry.
7. Thursday, 9-12, Chemistry.

Thursday, 2-5, Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Latin.
9. Saturday, 9-12, Botany Laboratory, Posology.
Saturday, 2-5, Physics.

Second Year College Class
May 4. Monday, 9-12, Materia Medica, Toxicology.

Monday / 2~3-30. Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence.
I 3:30-5, Pharm.aceutical Accounting.



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 87

6. Wednesday, 9-12, Dispensing Pharmacy

Wednesday, 2-5, Macroscopic and Microscopic Pharmacognosy.
8. Friday, 9-12, Analytical Chemistry.

Friday, 2-5, Organic Chemistry.
II. Monday, 9-12, Pharmacy.

University Classes

May 18. Monday, 9-12, Junior and Senior Pharmacy.

Monday, 1-4, Junior and Senior Analytical Chemistry.

19. Tuesday, 1-4, Junior Industrial Chemistry; Senior Food Analysis

and Toxicology.

20. Wednesday, 1-4, Sophomore, Junior and Senior Dispensing Pharmacy.

21. Thursday, 9-12, Senior Biological Chemistry.



ENDOWMENTS

For ninety-four consecutive years the College of Pharmacy of the City of
New York has maintained its annual courses of instruction for the education
and training of pharmacists. That this instruction has exhibited a steady ex-
tension and improvement is clearly recorded in the successive editions of its
annual prospectus. That such a result could not have been attained by the use
of students' fees, unaided by other resources, will be readily understood by all
who have had experience in educational administration. Such assistance may
be said to have begun with the generous contribution of free instruction services
by Professors Edward R. Squibb, Charles F. Chandler and others, in the early
historj' of the institution, and to have continued with the services of their suc-
cessors, and the unpaid management of the officers and trustees. At many times
financial crises have been met by generous donations of money by officers and
members, and occasionally by outside friends. In some cases, as when new
quarters were to be secured, a new building was to be erected, or herbarium or
apparatus to be bought, the sums thus contributed have been large, considering
the limited resources of those contributing.

As indicated in the preceding pages of this Announcement, in addition to the
regular course of two years, leading to the degree of Ph.G., the College now pro-
vides a regular course of three years leading to the degree of Ph.Ch., with three
additional years of optional work, leading to the degrees of B.S. in Phar. and
Phar. D. That the strain of such a charge upon our material resources is ver^'
great, calling as it does for an increased teaching force, newly equipped rooms
and additional apparatus, requires no explanatory statement.

It is not to be expected that the scanty revenue derived from the fees of the
small number of students who will pursue these advanced studies will begin to
provide the necessary means for meeting the additional expenditures. The Col-
lege must undertake these burdens as its contribution to pharmaceutical educa-
tion.

Under such conditions, it is felt that an appeal should be made to those who
are interested in promoting educational development in America to give their
favorable consideration and to lend their financial aid to the present efforts of
the School.

The necessity for additional rooms, equipment and instructors to meet the
increasing demand for this higher instruction has compelled us to begin the erec-
tion of a new building, the estimated cost of which will be about $300,000. Since
the actual instruction work of the school calls for the expenditure of our entire
income received from student's fees, it follows that we are compelled, like other
schools, to seek other courses of income for meeting this unusual expense. In
connection with our appeal for public assistance in this connection, it seems that
advantage should be taken of the opportunity for establishing the nucleus of a
permanent endowment, and a committee of the Trustees, Faculty and Alumni



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 89

Association has been formed for the purpose of raising by subscription a sum of
at least $300,000.

There are also a number of ways in which comparatively small contributions
will be immediately productive of great good in specific directions, and several
of these are discussed below.

Scholarships and Fellowships

The proposition that a school of pharmacy should establish a six-year course
for the Doctor's degree is absolutely new in this country. That it has never
before been attempted is due to the belief that candidates would be found want-
ing. While this is not believed to be true, it is very certain that the establish-
ment of such a class will be difficult and slow, and that assistance in its promotion
is urgently important. The establishment of a number of scholarships for one
or both of the final years would do much to encourage advanced study. Doubtless
the hope of successful competition for such a scholarship or fellowship would
annually induce a number of men to complete the baccalaureate course who
would otherwise be content to take the lower course, barely fitting themselves
for the practice of their profession.

An endowment of $5,000 would provide an income of $250, sufficient for tui-
tion during one of the graduate years.

One of $15,000 would provide a fellowship of $750, with which a student might
spend his final year in special studies, either in this or some foreign country.

Library Maintenance

The library facilities required by men engaged in the advanced studies of their
fifth and sixth years are necessarily much more extensive than those now provided
by the College. The research work in which such men will engage will call
for a full supply of works of reference, not only in pharmaceutical subjects, but
in the sciences contributory to pharmacy. Generous friends of the College, and
one such in particular, have made frequent and extensive contributions to the
Library, but it is highly desirable that an endowment be established that will
yield a permanent annual fund of $500 for such a purpose.

Apparatus

The College, thanks to the generosity of the late Mr. Edward Kemp, possesses
a splendid working equipment of physical apparatus, suitable for the ordinary
purposes of pharmaceutical education. The advanced work of graduate students
will require not only extensive additions, but continuous expenditures for new
designs in order to keep pace with discovery and improvement.

An endowment of from $5,000 to $10,000 would admirably meet this demand.

Museum

With the exception of the National Museum at Washington, there is no ex-
tensive pharmaceutical or materia medica museum in this country. Small
museums exist in Philadelphia, Detroit, Cincinnati, at the New York Botanical



90 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

Garden and elsewhere, but nowhere is there a museum proper comparable with
those in London and Berlin. Civic pride, if no other consideration, should suffice
to secure the establishment in New York City of a museum proportionate with
the importance of the city as the port of entry for more than three-fourths of
the drugs received into the United States. There are, however, other considera-
tions of far greater importance. Scarcely a week passes without more than one
inquiry from importers, brokers or merchants, and even from the City and Federal
Departments, for unobtainable information concerning commercial articles of
this class.

There should be some institution to which such inquirers could turn with
reasonable certainty of an accurate repl3\ Furthermore, the ambition to supply
Doctors of Pharmacy who are competent to meet all demands made upon them,
even for the discovery of desired unknown facts, renders it imperative that a
storehouse of materials for investigation should be available. The ideal location
for such a museum is with the department of pharmacy of a strong and active
university.

Such a museum involves more than a mere collection of labeled articles in
cases. It calls for a comprehensive plan providing for future accessions, and
for investigating the utility of new products. This calls for a curator with an
encjxlopedic knowledge of the subject, and qualified to pursue original researches.
Such an institution, thus equipped, could provide a continuous supply of original
contributions in economic botany, connected upon the one side with sources of
sound scientific information and authentication, and upon the other with the
material welfare of our people.

A more creditable and permanent monument to its donor could scarcely be
conceived. To establish such a museum, and also to provide properly for its
care and maintenance, would require from §100,000 to §150,000.

Additional Professorships

The establishment of a number of lecture courses to be ser\"ed by specialists
in their respective subjects is an essential requisite in the work of the final years
of an advanced course. Perhaps the most important of such subjects is the
history of chemistry and pharmacy. The provision of even a short series of
lectures would do much to point the way to investigation in the light of former
achievement.

Those desiring to contribute toward any of the purposes named, or others in
which they may be interested, will upon request be supplied with a form which
may be used for the purpose.



1924





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Twenty-fifth Series, No. 36 June 6, 1925

I ColtimiJia teiberssitp

bulletin of Snformatton



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK




ANNOUNCEMENT

1925-1926






PUBLISHED BY

Columbia ^nibersJitp
in tfje Citp of j^eto gorfe

MORNINGSIDE HEIGHTS
NEW YORK, N. Y.



Columbia Wini^tviitp JSulletm of information

Twenty-fifth Series, No. 36 June 6, 1925

Issued weekly at Columbia University, Morningside Heights, New York, N. Y. Entered as
second-class matter August 10, 1918, at the post-office at New York, N. Y., under the act of
August 24. 1912. Acceptance for mailing at a special rate of postage provided for in Section 1103,
Act of October 3, 1917, authorized. These include:

1. Annual Reports of the President and Treasurer to the Trustees.

2. The Catalogue of the University, price twenty-five cents, and the Announcements of the
several Colleges and Schools, and of certain Divisions, issued in the Spring, and relating to the
work of the next year. These are made as accurate as possible, but the right is reserved to make
changes in detail as circumstances require. The current number of any of these Announcements
will be sent without charge upon application to the Secretary of the University.

C. P.-20,000-I92S




COLLEGE OF PHARMACY OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK

II3-II9 WEST SIXTY-EIGHTH STREET




Columbia tetbersiitp

pulletin of Snformation



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK



ANNOUNCEMENT
1925-1926



PUBLISHED BY

Columbia ^nibcruitp
in ti)t C«p of iSebo gorfe

MORNINGSIDE HEIGHTS
NEW YORK CITY



TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE

Officers and Trustees 5

Committees of the Trustees 6

Faculty 7

General Statement 9

The College Building 14

The Library 14

Courses Offered 15

Employment for Students 15

Information Bureau 15

Important Announcements 16

Entrance Requirements, College Course 18

University Courses 20

Method of Instruction 21

Fees 23

Regulations of Board of Trustees 25

Requirements for Regular Students 25

Requirements for Graduation 26

Prizes and Scholarships 27

Outline of Courses 30-45

University Business Course 40

Summer 41

Evening Courses 42

Optional Courses of Instruction 44

Alumni Association 46

Endowments 47

Register of Graduates and Students 50

Academic Calendar 70



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Online LibraryCollege of Pharmacy of the City of New YorkCollege of pharmacy of the City of New York (Volume 1924/25-1930/31) → online text (page 9 of 61)