Columbia University.

Statutes of Columbia college and its associated schools: to which are added, the permanent resolutions and orders of the Board of trustees online

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STATUTES



J



OLUMBIA COLLEGE



ITS ASSOCIATED SCHOOLS



TO WHICH ARE ADDED,



THE PERMANENT RESOLUTIONS



ORDERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES.




NKW TO UK: -

D. VAN NO ST RAND, PUBLISHER^



'£i MriRRAY AND 'Si Ml'RRAY STREET.



1 874






-r^H^^









STATUTES



COLUMBIA COLLEGE



ITS ASSOCIATED SCHOOLS



TO WHICH ARE ADDED,



THE PERMANENT RESOLUTIONS



ORDERS OF THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES.




NEW YORK:

D. VAN NOSTRAND, PUBLISHER,



23 Murray and i!7 Murray Street.



1874



<




CONTENTS.



PAGE

Trustees of Columbia College "^

Standing Committee S

Committee ou the Course of Instruction "

u

Committee on the School of Mines

Committee on the School of Law 9

Committee on the Library 9

Committee on Honors '^

Faculty of Arts 10

Other Officers of the College H

Faculty of the School of Mines 13

Other Officers of the School of Mines 13

Faculty of the School of Law 13

Lecturers in the School of Law 13

Faculty of the School of Medicine 1^

Other Officers of the School of Medicine 15

Trustees of the Medical Department 16

Historical Sketch of Columbia College 17

STATUTES OF THE COLLEGE.

CHAPTER L

Of the President 35

CHAPTER n.

Of the Board of the College 36

CHAPTER ni.

Of the Course of Study .,., , 38



4: CONTENTS.



PAGE

CHAPTER IV.
Of Admission 30

CHAPTER V.
Of Attendance 32

CHAPTER VI.
Of Discipline 32

CHAPTER VII.
Of the Proficiency of the Students , 33

CHAPTER VIII.
Of Examinations for Honors 36

CHAPTER IX.
Of Commencements 37

CHAPTER X.
Of Vacations 38

CHAPTER XL
Of the Library 39

CHAPTER XII.
Of Free Scholarships , 40

CHA.PTER XIIL
Of Foundations 41



STATUTE ORGANIZING THE SCHOOL OF MINES.

CHAPTER I.
Of the President 43

CHAPTER IL
Of the Faculty of the School of Mines 43

CHAPTER III.
Of Discipline 44

CHAPTER IV.

Of Fees for Tuition , , 45



CONTENTS. 5

STATUTE ORGANIZING THE SCHOOL OF LAW.

PAGE

CHAPTER I.
Of the President 47

CHAPTER II.
Of the Warden 47

CHAPTER III.
Of the Faculty of Law 48

CHAPTER IV.
Of Discipline 49

RESOLUTIONS PROVIDING FOR A SCHOOL OF MEDICINE.

RESOLUTION L
College of Physicians and Surgeons adopted as the School of Medicine. . , 51

RESOLUTION II.
Manner of Conferring Degrees 51

RESOLUTION III.
Reservation of Power to Dissolve the Relation 51

MISCELLANEOUS RESOLUTIONS.

Resolutions concerning the College 53

Resolutions concerning the School of Mines 54

Resolutions concerning the School of Law 56

Resolutions creating the Committee on the Library 58

Resolutions relating to Diplomas 60

Resolution concerning Emeritus Professors 61

RULES AND ORDERS CONCERNING PRIZES.

Prizes in the College 63

Prizes in the School of Law 67

Prizes in the School of Medicine , 71



6 CONTENTS.



RULES OF ORDER.

PAGE

General Regulations 73

Chapel Regulations 74

Regulations of the Library 77



COLUMBIA COLLEGE.



NAMES. RESIDENCES.

HAMILTON FISH, LL. D., Chairman op the Board. 251 East 17th Street.

SAMUEL B. RUGGLES, LL. D 24 Union Square.

WM. BETTS, LL. D., Clerk 122 East 30th Street.

BENJAMIN L HAIGHT, S. T. D., LL. D 56 West 26th «

ROBERT RAT 363 West 28th "

GOUVERNEUR M. OGDEN, Treasurer. 187 Fulton, h. 84 West 11th "

HENRY J. ANDERSON, M. D., LL. D 60 Park Avenue.

EDWARD L. BEADLE, M.D Poughkeepsie.

GEORGE T. STRONG 113 East 21st Street.

MANCIUS S. HUTTON, S. T. D 47 East Ninth "

HORATIO POTTER, S. T. D., LL. D., D. C. L 38 East 22(1 "

LEWIS M.RUTHERFURD 175 Second Avenue.

THOMAS DEWITT, S. T. D 55 East Ninth Street.

JOHN C. JAY,M.D Rye, or 24 West 48th "

WILLIAM C. SCHERMERHORN 49 West 23d "

MORGAN DIX, S. T. D 27 West 25th "

FREDERICK A. P. BARNARD, S. T. D., LL. D., L. H. D., College Green.

SAMUEL BLATCHFORD, LL. D 12 West 22d Street.

STEPHEN P.NASH 11 West 19th "

CHARLES R. SWORDS 156 Broadway.

ANTHONY HALSEY 291 Broadway.

JOSEPH W.HARPER 231 Pearl Street.

CORNELIUS R. AGNEW, M. D 244 Madison Ave.

EVERT A. DUYCKINCK 20 Clinton Place.



. STANDING COMMITTEE.

NAMES. RESIDENCES.

GOUVERlSrEUE, M. OGDEN, Chairman 84 West 11th Street.

WILLIAM BETTS, LL. D 123 East 30th "

CHARLES R. SWORDS 156 Broadway.

WILLIAM C. SCHERMERHORN 49 West 23d Street.

ANTHONY HALSEY 291 Broadway.

JOSEPH W. HARPER ; 231 Pearl Street.



COMMITTEE ON THE COURSE OF INSTRUCTION.

NAMES. RESIDENCES.

HORATIO POTTER, S. T. D., LL. D., D. C. L 38 East 22d Street.

MORGAN DIX, S. T. D 27 West 25th "

GEORGE T. STRONG 113 East 2l8t "

LEWIS M. RUTHERFURD 175 Second Avenue.

FREDERICK A. P. BARNARD, S. T. D., LL. D,, L. H. D., College Green.



COMMITTEE ON THE SCHOOL OF MINES.

NAMES. RESIDENCES.

WILLIAM BETTS, LL. D., Chairman 122 East 30th Street.

GEORGE T. STRONG 113 East 2l8t "

LEWIS M. RUTHERFURD 175 Second Avenue.

FREDERICK A. P. BARNARD, S. T. D., LL. D., L. H. D., College Green.
HAMILTON FISH,LL.D... 251 East 17th Street.



Committees of the trustees.



COMMITTEE ON THE SCHOOL OF LAW.

NAMES. RESIDENCES.

SAMUEL B. RUGGLES, LL. D., Chairman 24 Union Square.

HAMILTON FISH, LL. D 251 East 17tli Street.

GOUVERNEUR M. OGDEN, Esq 84 West lltli "

GEORGE T. STRONG, Esq 113 East 2l8t "

WILLIAM BETTS, LL. D 122 East 30th "

SAMUEL BL ATCHFORD, LL. D 12 West 22d

STEPHEN P.NASH 11 West 19th «

THEODORE W. DWIGHT, LL. D 8 Great Jones "



COMMITTEE ON THE LIBRARY.

NAMES. RESIDENCES.

HENRY J. ANDERSON, M. D., LL. D., Chairman. .60 Park Avenue.

GEORGE T. STRONG 113 East 21st Street.

WILLIAM C. SCHERMERHORN 49 West 23d "

FREDERICK A. P. BARNARD, S. T. D., LL. D., L. H. D., CoUege Green.

BENJAMIN I. HAIGHT, S. T. D., LL. D 56 West 26th Street.

BEVERLEY R. BETTS, Clerk 122 East 30th "



COMMITTEE ON HONORS.

NAMES. RESIDENCES.

WILLIAM BETTS, LL. D., Chairman 122 East 30th Street.

HORATIO POTTER, S. T. D., LL. D., D. C. L 38 East 22d

HENRY J. ANDERSON, M. D., LL. D 60 Park Avenue.

GEORGE T. STRONG 113 East 21st Street.

FREDERICK A. P. BARNARD, S. T. D., LL. D., L. H. D., College Green.



NAMES. RESIDENCES.

FREDERICK A. P. BARNARD, S. T. D., LL.D., L. H. D. Columbia CoUege.
President.

HENRY JAMES ANDERSON, LL. D 60 Park Avenue.

Emeritus Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy.

HENRY DRISLER, LL. D 48 West 46th Street.

Jay Professor of the Greek Language and Literature.

HENRY L SCHMIDT, S. T. D 126 West 43d "

Gebhard Professor of the German Language and Literature.

CHARLES A. JOY, Ph. D Columbia College.

Professor of Chemistry.

CHARLES DAVIES, LL. D FishkiU Landing.

Emeritus Professor of the Higher Mathematics.

WILLIAM G. PECK, LL.D .126 East 35th Street.

Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy.

CHARLES MURRAY NAIRNE, L. H. D 163 West 34th "

Professor of Moral and Intellectual Philosophy and English Literature.

JOHN H. VAN AMRINGE, A. M 140 East 44th Street.

Professor of Mathematics and Secretary of the Faculty.

OGDEN N. ROOD, A.M 341 East 15th «

Professor of Mechanics and Physics.

CHARLES SHORT, LL.D 24 West 60th "

Professor of the Latin Language and Literature,



NAMES. RESIDENCES.

CORNELIUS R. DUFEIE, S. T. D 333 Lexington Av.

Chaplain.

BEVERLEY R. BETTS, A. M 122 East 30th St.

Librarian.

AUGUSTUS C. MERRIAM, A. M 491 Fifth Av.

Tutor in Latin and Greek.

JOHN D. QUACKENBOS, A. B 331 West 28th St.

Tutor in Rhetoric and History.

EDWARD JOHN HALLOCK, A. M 115 East 56th St.

Assistant in General Chemistry.

LEONARD WALDO, B. S Columbia College.

Assistant in the Astronomical Observatory.

JOHN H. VAN AMRINGE, A. M 140 East 44th St.

Secretary' of the Facultj'.

CHARLES A. CUSHMAN 419 West 19th St.

Secretary to the President.

WILLIAM H. WALTER, Mus. D Fordham, N. Y.

Organist.

STEPHEN R. WEEKS Columbia College.

Janitor and Assistant Librarian.



w



NAMES. RESIDKNCES.

FREDERICK A. P. BARNARD, S. T. D., LL.D., L. H. D. Columbia College.
President.

THOMAS EGLESTOlSr, Jr., A. M., E. M 10 Fifth Av.

Professor of Mineralogy and Metallurgy.

FRANCIS L. VINTON, E.M St. Dennis Hotel.

Professor of Mining Engineering.

CHARLES F. CHANDLER, Ph. D , M. D., LL.D.. ..51 East 54th St.

Dean of the Faculty, and Professor of Analytical and Applied Chemistry

CHARLES A. JOY, Ph. D Columbia College.

Professor of General Chemistry.

WILLIAM G-. PECK, LL.D 126 East 35th St.

Professor of Mechanics.

JOHN H. VAN AMRINGE, A. M 140 East 44th St.

Professor of Mathematics.

OaDEN N. ROOD, A. M 341 East 15th St.

Professor of Physics.

JOHN S. NEWBERRY, M. D., LL. D Columbia College.

Professor of Geology and Paleontologj'.

♦-<-♦



FREDERICK STENGEL, A. M 51 East 20th St.

Instructor in German.

JULES E. LOISEAU 3 East 33d St.

Instructor in French.

HENRY CARRINGTON BOLTON, A. M., Pn. D. . ..49 West 51st St.
Assistant in Analytical Chemistry.

ELWYN WALLER, A. M., E. M 33 West 15th St.

Assistant in Analytical Chemistiy.

ALEXIS A. JULIEN, A. M 110 East 80th St.

Assistant in Analytical Chemistry.

FREDERICK A. CAIRNS, A. M • • • • 40 Grove St.

Assistant in Analytical Chemistiy.



OTHER OFFICERS. 13

WILLIAM PISTOR, E. M Columbia College.

Assistant in DraM'ing.
HENRY NEWTON, A. B.. E. M 2G West 21st St.

Assistant inGeolog}'.
PIERRE DE PEYSTER RTCKETTS, E. M 33 East 74t.h St.

Assistant in Assaying.
CHARLES ADAMS COLTON, E. M 748 Fifth St.

Assistant in Mineralojry.
EDWARD JOHN HALLOCK, A. M 115 East r,6ih St.

Assistant in General Chemistry.
JOHN KROM REES, A. B 303 East 17th St.

Assistant in Mathematics.
WILLIAM HALSEY INGERSOLL, A. M., LL. B.. ..105 East 21st St.

Assistant in Civil Engineering.
JOHN E. MEYER 41 Horatio St.

Registrar and Librarian.
CHARLES RICHTER, Janitor Columbia College.

. -•♦•^



FREDERICK A. P. BARNARD, S. T. D., LL.D., L. H. D. Columbia College.

President.
THEODORE W. DWIGHT, LL. D 8 Great Jones Street.

Warden of the Law School, and Professor of Municipal Law.

y — — ^^ ,

Professor of Constitutional History' and Public Law.
CHARLES MURRAY NAIRNE. L. H. D 163 West 34th Street.

Professor of the Ethics of Jurisprudence.
JOHN ORDRONAUX, M. D., LL. D Roslyn, L. I.

Professor of Medical Jurisprudence,



CHARLES P. DALY, LL. D 84 Clinton Place.

GEORGE H. YEAMAN 306 Broadway.

CHARLES F. MACLEAN 12 East 12th Street.

JANITOR.
FELIX CURTIS 8 Great Jones Street.



EDWARD DELAPIELD, M. D.,

President.

WILLARD PARKER, M. D.,

Professor of Clinical Surgery.

ALONZO CLARK, M. D.,

Professor of Patholog;}' and Practical Medicine.

JOHN C. DATiTON, M. D.

Professor of Physiology and Hj^giene.

SAMUEL ST. JOHN, M. D.,

Professor of Chemistrj' and Medical Jurisprudence.

THOMAS M. MARKOE, M. D.,

Professor of Surgerj'. •

T. GAILLARD THOMAS, M. D.,

Professor of Obstetrics and the Diseases of Women and Children.

JOHN T. METCALFE, M. D.,

Professor of Clinical Medicine.

HENRY B. SANDS, M. D.,

Professor of Anatomy.

JAMES -W. McLANE, M. D.,

Adjunct Professor of Obstetrics and the Diseases of Women and Children.

THOMAS T. SABTNE, M. D.,

Adjunct Professor of Anatomy.

CHARLES E. CHANDLER, Ph. D.

A'^junct Professor of Chemistry and Medical Jurisprudence.

EDWARD CURTIS, M. D.,

Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics.

WILLIAM DETMOLD, M. D.,

Emeritus Professor of Clinical and Military Surgery.

WILLIAM H. DRAPER, M. D.,

Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Skin.

CORNELIUS R. ACNEW, M.D.,

Clinical Professor of Diseases of the Eye and Ear.

ABRAHAM JACOBI, M. D.,

Clinical Professor of Diseases of Children.

EESSENDEN N. OTIS, M. D.,

Clinical Professor of Venereal Diseases.

JOHN G. CURTIS, M. D.,
Demonstrator of Anatomy.

CHARLES McBURNEY, M. D.,
Assistant Demonstrator of Anatomy.



JAMES L. LITTLE, M. D.,

Lecturer on Operative Surgery and Surgical Dressings.

GEORGE G. WHEELOCK, M. D.,

Lecturer on Physical Diagnosis.

A. BRAYTON BALL, M. D.,

Lecturer on Diseases of the Kidneys.

FRANCIS DELAFIELD, M. D.,

Lecturer on Pathological Anatomy.

ROBERT r. WEIR, M. D.,

Lecturer on Diseases of the Male Pelvic Organs.

JOHN G. CURTIS, M. D.,

Lecturer on Injuries and Diseases of the Blood-vessels,

CLINICAL ASSISTANTS.

JAMES L. LITTLE, M. D. A. BRAYTON BALL, M. D.

JOHN T. KENNEDY, M. D. ALBERT H. BUCK, M. D.

GERARDUS H. WYNKOOP, M. D. LUCIUS D. BULKLEY, M. D.
HENRY F. WALKER, M. D. THOS. E. SATTERTHWAITE, M. D

CHARLES S. WARD, M. D. THOMAS A. McBRIDE, M. D.

ROBERT W. TAYLOR, M. D. FRANK P. KINNICUTT, M. D.

FRANCIS DELAFIELD, M. D. ISAAC ADLER, M. D.
W. DE FOREST DAY, M. D. SAMUEL B. St. JOHN, M. D.

WOOLSEY JOHNSON, M. D. ROBERT F. WEIR, M. D.

OREN D. POMEROY, M. D.

GEORGE B. FOWLER, M. D.
Curator of the College Museum.

EDWARD T. BOAG,

, . Clerk of the College.

ANDREW LOUGHLIN,
Janitor.



EDWARD DELAFIELD, M. D President.

EDWARD L. BEADLE, M. D. Vice-President.

ELLSWORTH ELIOT, M. D Registrar.

CAMBRIDGE LIVINGSTON Treasurer.



EDWARD G. LUDLOW, M. D.
EDWARD DELAFIELD, M. D.
JOHN P. CROSBY.
GURDON BUCK, M. D.
DANIEL D. LORD.
JAMES W. BEEKMAN.
BENJAMIN R. WINTHROP.
EDWARD L. BEADLE, M. D.
Hon. F. a. CONKLING.



CAMBRIDGE LIVINGSTON.
JARED LINSLT, M. D.
JOHN J. CRANE, M. D.
ELLSWORTH ELIOT, M. D.
JAMES L. BANKS, M. D. .
ROBERT G. REMSEN.
GEORGE D. H. GILLESPIE.
EDWARD H. LUDLOW.
EDWARD DELAFIELD, Jr.



Rev. SULLIVAN H. WESTON, D.D. WILLARD PARKER, M. D.
WILLIAM BETTS. JOHN G. ADAMS, M. D.

CHARLES CLARKSON GOODHUE.



HISTOEICAL SKETCH



COLUMBIA COLLEGE.



The establishment of a college in the city of New York, was
many years in agitation before the design was carried into
effect. At length, under an act of Assembly, passed iu Decem-
ber, 174(3, and other similar acts which followed, moneys were
raised by public lottery " for the encouragement of learning, and
towards the founding a college " within the colony. These
moneys were, in November, 1751, vested in trustees; of whom,
ten in number, seven were members of the Church of England,
and some of these seven were also vestrymen of Trinity Church.

These circumstances, together with the liberal grant of land to
the college by Trinity Church, excited apprehensions of a design
to introduce a church-establishmont within the province, and
caused violent opposition to the plan, as soon as it became known,
of obtaining a royal charter for the college.

This opposition, however, being at last iu a great measure sur-
mounted, the trustees in November, 1753, invited Dr. Samuel
Johnson, of Connecticut, to be President of the intended college.
Dr. Johnson consequently removed to New York in the month of
April following, and in July, 1754, commenced the instruction of
a class of students in a room of the school-house belonging to
Trinity Church ; but he would not absolutely accept of the Presi-
dency until after the passing of the charter. This took place on
the 31st of October in the same year, 1754; from which period
the existence of the college is properly to be dated. The governors



l8 HISTORICAL SKETCH OP COLUMBIA COLLEGE.

of the college, named in the charter, are the archbishop of Can-
terbury, and the first Lord commissioner for trade and plantations,
both empowered to act by proxies ; the lieutenant-governor of the
province, and several other public officers ; together with the rec-
tor of Trinity Church, the senior minister of the Reformed Pro-
testant Dutch Church, the ministers of the German Lutheran
Church, of the French Church, of the Presbyterian Congregation,
and the president of the college, all ex officio^ and twenty-four of
the principal gentlemen of the city. The college was to be known
by the name of King's College. Previously to the passing of the
charter, a parcel of ground to the westward of Broadway,
bounded by Barclay, Church, and Murray streets, and by the
Hudson river, had been destined by the vestry of Trinity Church
as a site for the college edifice ; and, accordingly, after the charter
was granted, a grant of the land was made, on the 13th of May,
1755. On a portion of this plot, at the foot of Upper Robinson
street, as it was at first called, but afterwards Park place, the col-
lege was subsequently built, and there stood for one hundred and
three years, until its removal to another site, in 1857, occasioned
by the demands of the business of the city. The part of the land
thus granted by Trinity Church, not occupied for college purposes,
was leased, and became a very valuable endowment to the college.
The sources whence the funds of the institution were derived
besides the proceeds of the lotteries above mentioned, were the
voluntary contributions of private individuals in this country, and
sums obtained by agents who were subsequently sent to England
and France. In May, 1760, the college buildings began to be
occupied. In March, 1763, Dr. Johnson resigned his office of
president, and the Rev. Dr. Myles Cooper, of Oxford, who had
previously been appointed Professor of Moral Philosophy, and
assistant to the president, was elected in his place. In 1767, a
grant of land was obtained, under the government of Sir Henry
Moore, of twenty-four thousand acres, situated in the northern
parts of the province of New York ; but by the terms of the treaty
which the State of New York concluded with Vermont upon its
erection into a separate state, this among other grants of land
lying within its limits, was annulled, and the college consequently
lost a tract of great value, inasmuch as it constituted the county
town of the county in which it was situated.



HISTOmCAL SKETCH OF COLUMBIA COLLEGE. l9

In August, of the year 1767, a medical school was established in
the college.

The following account of the institution, supposed to be written
by Dr. Cooper, shows its condition previously to the war of the
revolution :

" Since the passing of the charter, the institution hath
received great emolument by grants from his nlost gracious
majesty King George the Third, and by liberal contributions
from many of the nobility and gentry in the parent country ;
from the society for the propagation of the gospel in foreign parts,
and from several public- spirited gentlemen in America and else-
where. By means of these and other benefactions, the governors
of the college have been enabled to extend their plan of education
almost as diffusely as any college in Europe ; herein being taught,
by proper masters and professors, who are chosen by the govern-
ors and president. Divinity, Natural Law, Physic, Logic, Ethics,
Metaphysics, Mathematics, Natural Philosophy, Astronomy,
Geography, History, Chronology, Rhetoric, Hebrew, Greek,
Latin, Modern Languages, the Belles-Lettres, and whatever else
of literature may tend to accomplish the pupils as scholars and
gentlemen.

" To the college is also annexed a grammar school for the due
preparation of those who propose to complete their education with
the arts and sciences.

" All students but those in medicine, are obliged to lodge and
diet in the college, unless they are particularly exempted by the
governor or president ; and the edifice is surrounded by a high
fence, which also encloses a large court and garden, and a porter
constantly attends at the front gate, which is closed at ten o'clock
each evening in summer, and nine in winter ; after which hours,
the names of all that come in are delivered weekly to the presi-
dent.

"The college is situated on a dry gravelly soil, about one hun-
dred and fifty yards from the bank of the Hudson river, which it
overlooks ; commanding, from the eminence on which it stands, a
most extensive and beautiful prospect of the opposite shore and
country of New Jersey, the city and island of New York, Long
Island, Staten Island, New York bay and its islands, the Narrows*
forming the mouth of the harbor, etc., etc. ; ^nd being totally un-



20 HISTORICAL SKETCH OF COLUMBIA COLLEGE.

encumbered by any adjacent buildings and admitting the purest
circulation of air from the river, and every other quarter, has the
benefit of as agreeable and healthy a situation as can possibly be
conceived.

" Visitations by the governors are quarterly ; at which times,
premiums of books, silver medals, etc., are adjudged to the most
deserving.

" This seminary hath already produced a number of gentlemen,
who do great honor to their professions, the place of their educa-
tion, and themselves, in divinity, law, medicine, etc., etc., in this
and various other colonies, both on the American continent and
"West India Islands ; and the college is annually increasing as well
in students as reputation."

In consequence of the dispute between this and the parent coun-
try, Dr. Cooper returned to England, and the Rev. Benjamin Moore
was appointed prceses pro tempore during the absence of Dr. Cooper,
who, however, did not return.

On the breaking out of the revolutionary war, the business of
the college was almost entirely broken up, and it was not until
after the return of peace that its affairs were again regularly at-
tended to.

In May, 1784, the college upon its own application, was erected
into a university, and its corporate title changed from King's Col-
lege to that of Regents of the University. New professors were
appointed, and a medical department was established.

The college continued under that government until April, 1787 ;
when finding the attempt to establish a university unsuccessful,
they were restored to their original position under the present
name of Columbia College.

The original charter, with necessary alterations, was confirmed,
and the college placed under twenty-nine trustees, who were to
exercise their functions until their number should be reduced, by
death, resignation, or removal from the state, to twenty-four ; after
which, all vacancies in their Board were to be filled by their own
choice.

At the same time a new body was created, called by the same
name, "The Regents of the University," under which all the
seminaries of learning mentioned in the act creating it, were



HISTORICAL SKETCH OF COLUMBIA COLLEGE. 21

placed by the legislature. This bod}' still exists under its original
name.

In May, 1787, Dr. Win. Samuel Johnson, son of the first pres-
ident, was elected president of Columbia College. During the
previous vacancy of the presidential chair, the professors had pre-
sided in turn ; and certificates were given to graduates, in place of
regular diplomas.

In the beginning of the year 1792, the medical school was
placed upon a more respectable and efficient footing than before.

Dr. Johnson resigned the office of president in July, 1800, and
was succeeded the year following by the Rev. Dr. Wharton, who
resigned his office at the end of about seven months.

Bishop Moore succeeded Dr. Wharton as president. His ecclesi-
astical duties were such, that he was not expected to take an
active part in the business of the college, except on particular oc-
casions. The chief management of its concerns devolved upon the
professors.

In 1809, the requisites for entrance into college, to take effect
the following 3'ear, were very much raised, and a new course of
study and system of discipline was established.

A new amended charter was obtained from the legislature in
1810 ; by which the power of the college to lease its real estate for
twenty-one years was extended to sixty-three years.

Bishop Moore resigned his office as President in May, 1811, in
order to make room for some person who might devote his whole
time and attention to the college ; and in June following, a new
office, styled that o£ provost, was created. The provost was to sup-
ply the place of the president in his absence, and was to conduct
the classical studies of the senior class. Shortly after this new ar-
rangement, the Eev. Wm. Harris, and the Eev. John M. Mason,
were elected president and provost.

In consequence of the establishment of the College of Physicians
and Surgeons in New York, the Medical School of Columbia Col-
lege was in November, 1813, discontinued.

The provost resigned his office in 1816 ; since which time the
college has been under the sole superintendence of a president.

In 1814, a grant was made to the college by the legislature, of
a tract of land on Manhattan Island, of about twenty acres, which
had been occupied as a botanic garden by the late Dr. Hosack, and



22 HISTORICAL SKETCH OF COLUMBIA COLLEGE.

had been purchased of him by the state. The grant was accom-
panied by the condition that the college should be removed to the
tract so granted within twelve years. In 1819, this condition was
repealed. At that time the lands were valued at two hundred and


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Online LibraryColumbia UniversityStatutes of Columbia college and its associated schools: to which are added, the permanent resolutions and orders of the Board of trustees → online text (page 1 of 5)