Confederate States of America. President.

University of New Haven Graduate Bulletin, 1980-81 (Volume 1980-81) online

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AC 30

1980/81

Grad

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New Haven




Graduate School
1980-1981

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University of New IHaven



Graduate Bulletin
1980-1981



Main Campus:

300 Orange Avenue

West Haven, Connecticut 06516



This bulletin supersedes all previous bulletins, catalogs and bro-
chures published by the Graduate School and describes academic
programs to be offered during 1980-1981 . Graduate students admit-
ted to the university in the fall of 1980 and thereafter are bound by the
regulations published in this bulletin.

The University of New Haven does not discriminate on \he basis
of age, race, sex, religion, national origin or handicap in admission or
treatinent of students or in recruitment and treatment of employees.

The male generic terms appearing throughout this book refer to
both males and females and are used for grammatical simplicity and
semantic convenience.

The university reserves the right, at any time, to make whatever
changes may be deemed necessary in admission reguirements, fees,
charges, hjition, regulations and academic programs prior to the start
of any class, term, semester, trimester or session.



The Bulletin of the University of New Haven is published eight times per year in
February, April, May (2), July (2) and November (2) by the University of New Haven,
300 Orange Avenue, West Haven, Connecticut 06516. Second class postage p)aid at
New Haven, Connecticut, publication number USPS 423-410. Postmaster: please send
form 3579 to Office of Public Relations, University of New Haven, PO. Box 1306, New
Haven, CT 06505.



Contents

Academic Calendar iv

General Information 1

Student Activities and Other Services 23

Academic Programs 39

Accounting 40

Business Administration 42

Business Administration/Industrial Engineering dual degree 50

Community Psychology 52

Computer and Information Science 55

Criminal Justice , 56

Electrical Engineering 60

Environmental Engineering 62

Environmental Sciences 64

Executive M.BA 65

Forensic Science 67

Gerontology 69

Humanities 71

Industrial Engineering 72

Industrial Relations 74

Logistics , 76

Mechanical Engineering 79

Operations Research 80

Organizational/Industrial Psychology 82

Public Administration 86

Senior Professional Certificates 87

Taxation 94

Course Descriptions 99

Board, Administration and Faculty 151

Index 187



ACADEMIC CALENDAR
1980-1982



Graduate School



1980-1981

SUMMER TERM: Monday, July 14-Thursday, August 28

Fall term deadline for receipt of completed
applications for admission and all supporting materials * August 1

FALL TERM: Wednesday, September 3 -Saturday, December 13

Last day to register Friday, August 22

Last day to add a class Tuesday, September 9

Fall holiday Wednesday- Saturday, September 10-13
Last day to file petition for

January graduation Friday, October 10

Holiday (Thanksgiving) Monday -Saturday, November 24-29

Final examinations Monday-Saturday, December 15-20

WINTER TERM: Saturday, January 3-Thursday, April 2

Last day to register Friday, December 19

Last day to submit grades for students expecting to

graduate in January Commencement Wednesday, January 7, 198 1

Last day to add a class Saturday, January 10

Holiday (President's Day) Monday, February 16

(Monday classes will meet Friday, February 20)
Last day to file petition for

June graduation Friday, February 27

Spring term deadline for receipt of completed applications

for admission and all supporting materials * Monday, March 2



' Prospective students completing their applications after this date may register lor one term as nonmatnculated
students. This registration of those whose applications are in process does not guarantee acceptance.

International students are not eligible lor in process registration because ol immigration requirements and should sub-
mit completed appbcations and all supporting matenals well in advance of these deadlines



Graduate School



SPRING TERM: Monday, April 6-Saturday, July 11

Last day to register Friday, March 27

Last day to add a class Monday, April 1 3

Last day to submit grades for students expecting to

graduate in June Commencement Tuesday, May 12

Holiday (Memorial Day) Monday,' May 25

(Monday classes will meet Friday, May 29,
usual time)
Commencement Sunday, June 7

Holiday (Independence Day) Saturday, July 4

(Saturday classes will meet Saturday, July 1 1 ,

usual time)



Undergraduate Day Division



Fall Semester 1980



Tuition and Residence charge due Monday, August 4

Residence Hall opens for New Students Sunday, August 3 1

Residence Hall opens for Returning Students Monday, September 1

Orientation for New Students Monday -Tuesday, September 1 -2

Classes begin Wednesday, September 3

Last day to add day courses without late fee Thursday, September 4

Last day for schedule revisions Tuesday,' September 9

Last day to petition for January graduation Wednesday, October 1 5

Last day to drop courses Friday,' October 1 7

Holiday (Thanksgiving) Thursday-Friday, November 27-28

Classes end Friday, December 1 2

Reading Days Saturday-Sunday, December 13-14

Final Examinations Monday-Saturday, December 1 5-20

Last day of semester Saturday, December 20

Residence Hall closes 6:00 p.m., Monday, December 22

Commencement Sunday, January 1 8



Spring Semester 1981



Tuition and Residence charge due

Residence Hall opens for New Students

Residence Hall opens for Returning Students

Orientation for New Students

Classes begin

Last day to add day courses without late fee

Last day for schedule revisions

Last day to petition for June graduation

Last day to drop courses

Spring recess

Classes resume



Monday, January 5

Saturday, January 17

Sunday, January 1 8

Sunday, January 1 8

Monday, January 1 9

Tuesday, January 20

Friday, January 23

Monday, March 2

Friday, March 6

Sunday-Sunday, March 8-15

Monday, March 16



Academic Calendar



Good Friday -Passover Holiday

Classes end

Reading day

Final examinations

Last day of semester

Residence Hall closes

Commencement



Friday -Sunday, April 17-19

Monday, May 1 1

Tuesday, May 12

Wednesday -Tuesday, May 13-19

Tuesday, May 19

6:00 p.m., Wednesday, May 20

Sunday, June 7



Fall Semester 1981



Tuition and Residence charge due Monday, August 3

Residence Hall opens for New Students Sunday, August 30

Residence Hall opens for Returning Students Monday, August 3 1

Orientation for New Students Monday -Tuesday, August 3 1 -September 1
Classes begin Wednesday, September 2

Last day to add day courses without late fee Thursday, September 3

Holiday (Labor Day) Monday, September 7

Last day for schedule revisions Wednesday, September 9

Last day to petition for January graduation Thursday, October 1 5

Last day to drop courses Friday, October 1 6

Holiday (Thanksgiving) Thursday-Friday, November 26-27

Classes end Monday, December 14

Reading day Tuesday, December 15

Final examinations Wednesday -Tuesday, December 16-22

Last day of semester Tuesday, December 22

Residence Hall closes 6:00 p.m. , Wednesday, December 23

Commencement Sunday, January 17



Spring Semester 1982



Tuition and Residence charge due

Residence Hall opens for New Students

Residence Hall opens for Returning Students

Orientation for New Students

Classes begin

Last day to add day courses without late fee

Last day for schedule revisions

Holiday (President's Day)

Last day to petition for June graduation

Last day to drop courses

Spring recess

Classes resume

Good Friday -Passover Holiday

Classes end

Reading day

Final examinations

Last day of semester

Residence Hall closes

Commencement



Monday, January 4

Saturday, January 16

Sunday, January 17

Sunday, January 17

Monday, January 18

Tuesday, January 19

Friday, January 22

Monday, February 15

Monday, March 1

Friday, March 5

Sunday -Sunday, March 7-14

Monday, March 15

Thursday-Sunday, April 8- 1 1

Monday, May 10

Tuesday, May 1 1

Wednesday -Tuesday, May 12-18

Tuesday, May 18

6:00 p.m., Wednesday, May 19

Sunday, June 6



Undergraduate Evenings



Division of Evening Studies
(Undergraduate)



Summer Semester 1980

Registration period Tuesday-Friday, May 27-June 6

Tuition due Monday , June 9

First term classes begin Monday, June 9

Holiday (Independence Day) Friday, July 4

First term final examinations Monday, July 14

Second term classes begin Wednesday,' July 1 6

Second term final examinations Wednesday, August 20



Fall Semester 1980

Registration for current

and former students Monday-Friday, August 4-15

Registration for new students Monday -Tuesday, August 18-19

Tuition due Tuesday, August 26

Classes begin Wednesday, September 3

Last day to add evening courses without late fee Tuesday, September 9

Last day for schedule revisions Tuesday, September 9

Last day to petition for January graduation Wednesday, October 15

Last day to drop courses Friday! October 1 7

Holiday (Thanksgiving) Wednesday-Sunday, November 27-30

Classes end Friday, December 1 2

Final examinations Monday-Saharday, December 15-20

Commencement Sunday, January 18



Spring Semester 1981

Registration for current

and former stiidents Tuesday -Monday , January 6- 1 2

Registration for new students Monday -Tuesday, January 12-13

Tuition due Friday, January 1 6

Classes begin Monday, January 19

Last day to add evening courses without late fee Friday, January 23

Last day for schedule revisions Friday! January 23

Holiday (President's Day) Monday, February 16

Last day to petition for June graduation Monday, March 2

Last day to drop courses Friday,' March 6

Spring recess Sunday-Sunday, March 8- 1 5

Classes resume Monday, March 16

Holiday (Good Friday-Passover) Friday-Sunday, April 17-19



Academic Calendar



Classes end Monday, May 1 1

Final examinations Tuesday -Monday , May 12-18

Commencement Sunday, June 7



Summer Semester 1981

Registration period Tuesday-Friday, May 26-]une 5

Tuition due Monday, June 8

First term classes begin Monday, June 8

Holiday (Independence Day) Saturday, July 4

First term final examinations Monday, July 13

Second term classes begin Wednesday, July 15

Second term final examinations Wednesday, August 19



Fall Semester 1981



Registration for current

and former students Monday - Friday , August 3-14

Registration for new students Monday -Tuesday , August 17-18

Tuition due Wednesday, September 2

Classes begin Wednesday, September 2

Holiday (Labor Day) Monday, September 7
Last day to add evening courses without late fee

(except Monday courses) Wednesday, September 9

Last day for schedule revisions Monday, September 14

Last day to petition for January graduation Thursday, October 15

Last day to drop courses Friday, October 16

Holiday (Thanksgiving) Wednesday -Sunday, November 26-29

Classes end Monday, December 14

Final examinations Tuesday-Monday, December 15-21

Commencement Sunday, January 17



Spring Semester 1982

Registration for current

and former students Tuesday-Monday, January 5- 1 1

Registration for new students Monday -Tuesday , January 11-12

Tuition due Friday, January 15

Classes begin Monday, January 18

Last day to add evening courses without late fee Friday, January 22

Last day for schedule revisions Friday, January 22

Holiday (President's Day) Monday, February 15

Last day to petition for June graduation Monday, March 1

Last day to drop courses Friday, March 5

Spring recess Sunday-Sunday, March 7-14



Undergraduate Evenings



Classes resume Monday, March 15

Holiday (Good Friday -Passover) Thursday-Sunday, April 8- 1 1

Classes end Monday, May 10

Final examinations Tuesday -Monday, May 11-17

Commencement Sunday, June 6









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GENERAL
INFORMATION

History of the university

Since its founding in 1920, the University of New Haven has
grown from a small junior college to a major, urban, coeducational in-
dependent university.

Begun as New Haven YMCA Junior College, a branch of North-
eastern University, the college became New Haven College in 1926
by an act of the Connecticut General Assembly. For nearly 40 years,
the college held classes in space rented from Yale University. In Sep-
tember 1958, the college completed construction of a classroom build-
ing on Cold Spring Street, New Haven, for its daytime engineering
building.

That same year, the college received its first authorization from
the Connecticut Legislature to offer the Bachelor of Science degree in
fields of business accounting, management and industrial engineering.

But though its student body on the new Cold Spring Street cam-
pus numbered fewer than 200 persons, the college's facilities were fast
becoming overcrowded. To meet the needs of the college and the local
community, the Board of Governors purchased in 1960 the three
buildings and 25 acres of land in West Haven which formerly be-
longed to the New Haven County Orphanage. The combination of
greatly increased classroom space and the four-year degree program
sparked a period of tremendous growth in enrollment and facilities. In
1961, the year after the college moved to West Haven, the graduating
class numbered 75. Fifteen years later, that figure had climbed to
1,000.

The acquisition of 28 acres of undeveloped land near the main
campus in 1962 made possible the construction of playing fields, tennis
courts and a new Physical Education- Auditorium Building. In October
1974, the Marvin K. Peterson Library on the Main Campus opened to
students.

New Haven College received full accreditation of its bac-
calaureate programs from the New England Association of Schools
and Colleges in 1966, which enabled the college to work toward the



General Information

achievement of one of its principal objectives: to provide leaders and
professional personnel with an understanding of important cultural and
scientific progress, and to encourage students to reach their maximum
potential.

In 1969, the college took a major step forward with the addition of
the Graduate School. Initially offering programs in business adminis-
tration and industrial engineering, the Graduate School expanded
rapidly. Today, 20 programs and additional courses have pushed
graduate enrollment to more than 2,200.

FROM COLLEGE TO UNIVERSITY

On the fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the college, in 1970,
New Haven College became the University of New Haven, reflecting
the increased scope and the diversity of academic programs offered.
Originally founded to meet a single distinct need in the New Haven
community, the institution now ranks as a major academic institution of-
fering programs in more than 50 different areas of study. This wide
range of studies provides a total educational experience for University
of New Haven students.

In the past 19 years, the institution has grown from a small college
with 1,000 part-time, undergraduate evening students to a diverse ur-
ban university enrolling 9,000 full- and part-time, graduate, under-
graduate and special students on the main campus in West Haven and
at eight locations around the state.

Today, the university offers some 100 graduate and undergrad-
uate degree programs in five schools: the Graduate School and the
Schools of Arts and Sciences, Business Administration, Engineering
and Professional Studies and Continuing Education.

Undergraduate courses and programs are offered in. West Haven
on the main campus as well as on the Mitchell campus in New London
and on the Saint loseph's College campus in Hartford.

Graduate courses and programs are offered in West Haven and in
Greenwich, Danbury, Middlebury, Waterbury, Middletown, Groton
and New London.

The University of New Haven has continually expanded its course
and program offerings. The university adopted a policy for the 1970's
which, in part, directed particular attention to the educational needs of
the people of the state of Connecticut through programs in both day
and evening divisions that reflect the needs of the area and of the times.

THE FUTURE

Plans for the growth of the university center around the $12
million Campaign for Excellence, a multi-purpose campaign which
calls for building construction, the endowment of scholarships, the ex-
pansion of library resources, the creation of endowed professorships
and for general campus improvements. Counting gifts, bequests and
other forms of income, the campaign total has reached five million
dollars.



Philosophy of the University/Accreditation



Philosophy of the university

The basic assumptions and goals which have governed and con-
tinue to govern the academic programs and life of the university are:
the belief that there is value and virtue in a general education to help
students acguire an understanding of society and the place of the in-
dividual within it; a conviction that the hallmark of an educated person
is a critical mind in the sense of a capacity to test and challenge
previous assumptions and new ideas; a strong comimitment to the prin-
ciple that in a complex and technological society a university cannot
be insensitive to the need of its students for professional training which
will enable them to obtain rewarding and productive employment; and
that a higher education must provide students with a breadth of
knowledge and a sensitivity to weigh ethical and moral issues and form
values and life goals.

Other assumptions and considerations governing the academic
programs and activities of the university have been: recognition of the
need for students to participate in work and service activities which
provide contacts with other aspects of society and in using skills and
exercising judgment and responsibility in a variety of settings outside
the university community; the importance of allowing full play and
scope to the creative abilities and intellectual curiosity of students
through opportunities to pursue independent study and investigation;
the importance of recognizing the educational interests of students
geared toward specific professions and careers as students seek to ad-
just to changing labor market conditions; and, lastly, preparing stu-
dents for graduate and professional training beyond the baccalaureate.



Accreditation

The University of New Haven is fully accredited as a general pur-
pose institution by the New England Association of Schools and
Colleges.

Representative memberships in which the university is an active
participant include the Council of Graduate Schools, the Northeastern
Association of Graduate Schools, the New England Association of
Graduate Schools, the Assembly of the American Association of Col-
legiate Schools of Business, the College Entrance Examining Board,
the American Society of Engineering Education, the Educational
Testing Service American Council on Education, American Associa-
tion for Higher Education, Association of Urban Universities, Council
for the Advancement of Small Colleges, and the National Commission
on Accrediting. The Engineers' Council for Professional Development
has accredited the undergraduate mechanical, industrial, civil, and
electrical engineering programs.



General Information



Affirmative action

The University of New Haven is committed to affirmative action
and to a policy which provides for equal opportunity in employment,
advancement, admission, educational opportunity and administration
of financial aid to all persons on the basis of individual merit. This
policy is administered without regard to race, color, national origin,
age, sex, religion or disabilities not related to performance.



TITLE IX

It is the policy of the University of New Haven not to discriminate
on the basis of sex in its admission, educational programs, activities or
employment policies as required by Title IX of the 1972 Education
Amendments.

Inquiries regarding affirmative action, equal opportunity and Title
IX may be directed to the director of equal opportunity.



Schools of the university



Undergraduate students at the University of New Haven may
elect majors in one of four schools, the School of Arts and Sciences, the
School of Business Administration which includes the Division of
Criminal Justice, the School of Engineering and the School of Profes-
sional Studies and Continuing Education which includes the Division of
Evening Studies. Graduate programs are offered through the
Graduate School. All schools within the university are coeducational.



School of Arts and Sciences

The School of Arts and Sciences offers programs leading to the
associate in science degree, the bachelor of arts degree and the bach-
elor of science degree. Through the Graduate School, the School of
Arts and Sciences offers programs leading to the master of arts degree,
the master of science degree, and the senior professional certificate.

Associate in science degree programs are offered in 9 fields:
biology, chemistry, environmental studies, fashion design, fire and oc-
cupational safety, general studies, graphic and advertising design, in-
terior design and journalism.

Bachelor of arts degree programs are offered in 18 fields: art,
biology, chemistry, communication, economics, English, fashion de-
sign, graphic and advertising design, history, interior design, mathe-



Schools of the University



matics, philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, social
welfare, sociology and world music.

Bachelor of science degree programs are offered in three fields:
biology, chemistry, and environmental studies.

Detailed information on these undergraduate programs is avail-
able in the Undergraduate Bulletin.

Master of arts degree programs are offered in four fields: com-
munity psychology, gerontology, humanities and organizational /in-
dustrial psychology.

The master of science degree is offered in environmental sciences.

The senior professional certificate is offered in applications of
psychology.

Detailed information on these graduate programs is available in
this Graduate Bulletin.

School of Business Administration

The School of Business Administration offers programs leading to
the associate in science degree and the bachelor of science degree.
Through the Graduate School, the School of Business Administration
offers programs leading to the master of science degree, the master of
business administration degree, the master of public administration
degree, the executive master of business administration degree and the
senior professional certificate.

Associate in science degree programs are offered in four fields:
business administration; communication; hotel management, tourism
and travel; and retailing.

Bachelor of science degree programs are offered in 20 fields:
business administration; business data processing; business economics;
business science — biology; business science — chemistry; business
science — physical science; business science — physics; communica-
tion; finance; financial accounting; hotel management, tourism and
travel; institutional food service administration; international business;
management science; managerial accounting; marketing; operations
management; personnel management; public administration and re-
tailing.

Detailed information on these undergraduate programs is
available in the Undergraduate Bulletin.

Master of science degree programs are offered in three fields: ac-
counting, industrial relations and taxation.

The master of business administration degree, the executive
master of business administration degree and the master of public ad-
ministration degree are also offered.

The senior professional certificate is offered in accounting and tax-
ation, economic forecasting, finance, general management, interna-
tional business, marketing, media for business, public management,
quantitative analysis.

Detailed information on these graduate programs is available in
this Graduate Bulletin.



General Information



DIVISION OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE

The Division of Criminal Justice within the School of Business Ad-
ministration offers programs leading to the associate in science degree
and the bachelor of science degree. Through the Graduate School, the
Division of Criminal Justice offers programs leading to the master of
science degree.

Associate in science degree programs are offered in two fields:
criminal justice — administration and criminal justice — corrections.

Bachelor of science degree programs are offered in five fields:
criminal justice — administration, criminal justice — corrections,


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Online LibraryConfederate States of America. PresidentUniversity of New Haven Graduate Bulletin, 1980-81 (Volume 1980-81) → online text (page 1 of 16)