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HARVARD
COLLEGE
LIBRARY



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^^jU/'ko^.^'.-pr



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THE GRAYJACKETS:



AKD



OW THEY LIVED, foUGJp^AONDIED,

FOE DIXIE.



lITfl INCIDENTS & SETCHES OF LIFE IN THE CONFEDEBACT.



00MPKI8IKO KAKBATIVEBOF FEB80HAL ADVEVTURE, ABMT UFE; VAYAL

ADVEHTUBB, BOMB UEE, PABTI8AH DAAIVO, LIFE IE THE GAMP,

FIBU) AHD HOSPITAL I TOOETHEB WITH THE 80H08, BALLADQi

AlEODOTEB AHD HUKOR0U8 IH0IDEHT8 OF THE

WAR FOR SOUTHERN IHDEPEHDEHCE.



ftoMd hj mbMerlptlon only, iin«l not f v r^lo In the book atore*. Ken^jitt oC My State
ioilriiig acopj thonU addrwi thspnblbbMtyMid mi tgMit vlll call upon lh«M.)



BY A CONFEDERATE.



JONES BROTHERS & CO.,

niOIIMOND, VA. ; ATLANTA, OA. ; PHILADELPHIA, PA. ;
CINCINNATI, OHIO; ST. LOUIS, MO.; CHICAGO. ILT



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C^S 6)252./^



^ c-



■. . ' L>



AHARVAP-r
jUNIVEl,".;;
J LIDRARV
11 OCT 8 1941



iBlivdl MooHliV to lei or OoQgran, In tbo joor IMT. I»r

JOMBB BROTaiEtt A OUl,

IB tiM Okik't OOet of Iho Mitrict Ooori r( Uio UnlUd BUtoi, io owl ft)r IIm iMtorn
IMttriot ol PumMylvonlo.



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TO

THE MEMORY
oy

THOSE WHO DIED FOR DIXIE,

IHIS BOOK IS DEDIOATBD.



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PREFACE.

Several Southern histories of the late war have
been given to the pubUc since the close of hostilities,
but no one has ventured to collect in a convenient and
permanent form a record of the inside-life of the
people of the South, during their struggle for inde-
pendence. The Editor has thought that a volume of
this kind — which shall tell simply and truthfully the
story of the daring, the sufferings, and heroic forti-
tude of the people and soldiers of the South, and at
the same time recall to mind the wit and humor, the
quaint sayings and the rough caiup jests by which
tliose dark and trying days were wont to be enlivened
— ^will prove a timely and useful contribution to the
literature of the war.

The present volume does not aspire to the dignity
of history, but is devoted almost entirely to those
topics which the historian must of necessity pass over
in silence. The Editor has grouped together in these
pages the instances of personal daring, the anecdotes,
the " sayings and doings" of the Grayjackets in the
army and navy, the songs and ballads, and such ac-



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6 PREFACE.

counts of the home life and *' internal arrangements"
of Dixie^ as could be gathered from the current lite-
rature of the day; believing as he does, that the
everyday life and sayings of a people afford a better
and more intimate knowledge of them, than can ever
be gained from the dry pages of history, and that the
songs and wit of the camp are equally true indices to
the character of an army.

The chief difficulty of such an undertaking lay in
selecting from the mass before him, such material as it
was thought would be most suited to the work. The
limits of the book necessarily excluded much that it
was desired to use, but it is believed that enough is
given to make the picture complete. The incidents
related in these piigcs are of actual occurrence, and
almost every article is from the pen of some gallant
soldier or sailor who proved his devotion to Dixie, by
his deeds, or from one of those noble women whose faith
in the cause was equalled only by their love of country.

The book being of such a character, it is believed
that no better title could be chosen for it, than that
which it bears — a name made dear to the South by
four years of glory and heroic suffering.



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CONTENTS.



PAET I.
KARRATIVES OF PERSONAL DARING AND ADYENTORE.



A daring fcnt 11

jn tho wrong place 13

" Fighiln' Obcr a Bone." ... 14
A scenting adventure on

tho reninsnta 14

How Butler was sold 16

Jnst heard the News 19

Carrying dispatches to Yickfu

burg 20

Easily satisfied 25

Norah McOartey 26

A modest request 30

Travelling to Dixie 30

Dixie 44

A rich letter to George D.

Prcntise 45

Qeneral Bragg and the young

officer 47

Anecdotes of Qeneral Magru-

der 48

Qeneral Bragg's army 50

Ah Incident under a flag of

truce 51

A sable philosopher. 52

A songof tlie South 54

Belle Boyd in the Federal

lines 57

Southern heroism 70

A Contraband description of

Beaureffard 71

Examining Burgeons 73

Love v$. Duty 74

Which side? 75

Tapping tlie Telegraph 76

Colonel Menefee*8 escape... 77



Intrepid conduct of two boys. 79
Captain Montgomery's ad*

venture 80

The song of Uie South 82

Negro heroism 83

Adventures of George N.

Sanders 84

Jackson on a retreat 87

Execution of Confederate

officers 89

A touching incident 96

A fulUblooded Confederate.. 98

nie Boy-Maior 99

Hardee outdone 99

There's life in the old land

yetl 100

Not down in the " Tactics.".. 102
General Lee and the officer.. 103^
A long way from Headquar-
ters 103

Belle Boyd in prison 104

Bosecrans and the Confeder-
ate officer 115

"Call alU Call oUr 117

Black, the Scotch deserter,

at Leesburg 118

A new use for a shell 119

An Englishman in Missis-
sippi 120

Anecdotes of Stonewall Jack- .

son 1231

General Lee 124)

Jackson at Kcrnsiown 125 I

General Sidney Johnson's pa- '
triotism 126



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8



CONTENTS.



FAOS

A Blight mistake 12G

Crossing the border 127

A modest wish 137

Anocdoles of Oenoral R. E. \
I-ee.. 138]



Stonewall Jackson and Ihe ^ \

farmer 139/

A very long war 141

Demoralized U'i

ZolUcoflfer. 142



PART II.
THE GRAYJACKETS IN CAMP, FIELD, AND HOSPITAL



The Angel of the Hospital. . 143
Heroism of Soathem troops. 147
Rzecation of Oaptain Web-
ster 148

A war picture 150

A spicy correspondence. 156

Carrying out liis orders 157

The lone Sentry.... 158

Conscript Qualtcrs 160

Letters to soldiers 160

Sharp-shooting 161

A night cruise in Charleston

Harbor 163

Preaching under fire 167

Don't shoot any more, that's

fatlior 169

Badly sold 170

JohnPolImm 171

A just tribute 172

Don't belong to Butler's army 175

Caralry va. Infantry 175

Destroying a railroad 176

A Confederate heroine. 177

A snow-ball battle 177

On the battle-field 179

The fate of a Spy 182

The private soldier 184

Falling back at the wrong

moment.... 187

Somebody's darling 187

Soutliern valor 189

Mr. Davis's trap for Grant. . 191
A remarkable adventure. • . • 191
The closing scenes at Shiloh. 193

A Conscript story 202

(Irand rounds .••• 203



General Polk in a very tight

place. 203

A gallant lieutenant 205

An incident at Gettysburg.. 206
1'he fall of Island Number

i- en. •••• •••• •••• •••••• ^uo

Stonewall Jackson's way 21(t\

The Reserves at Petersburg, *

Virginia. 212

A friendly warning.. .* 220

Just for a sick man. 221

Selling a parson 222

Under fire 223

Hard to move 229

A llevicw in General Leo's

army *229

An efiVirt for freedom 2.'i3

Bagged Tcxans— Boots and

Booty 2:i5

An impudent reply 236

Sad death of a soldier.... 238
Escaping from Fort Dela-
ware 239

Endurance in camp life 240

Sumter in ruins 24 L

Looking on at (jicttysburg. 24 *J

Who ate the dog ? 257

A friendly offer 258

'ilie neutral cornfield 259

Life in Batter/ Wagner.... 260
Lon^trcet and the spy — 2G'i\
The Bible on the battle-field. 268 '
General Cheatham's escape.. 26H

Camp life 269

'i*he Confederates in Mary-
land 273



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CONTENTS.



9



PAOI

A story of Sliiloh.... 276

The band in the pines 277

Jackson's parting with his \

old briffade 277/

The Good Samaritan 280

A full ration for once *. 280

The man who swallowed a

dram 282

Tlie burial of Stuart. 282)



PA91

The last six days of the army

of Northern Virginia... 285

General Green believes he
was shot at 298

Ahero 300

Most extraordinary marches
on record 300

"All quiet along the Poto-
mac" 301



PART III.

PARTISAN LIFE AND ADVENTDRE.



The guerrillas 303

The capture of Gatlett's Sta-
tion 306

In Uic wrong place 308

Lieutenant AlcNeiirs ex-
ploit. 309

A Dulcliinnn's opinion of

Jackson 314

Insulting women-folkf) 315

Anecdote of John Morgan... 31G

The Marion of the wur 317

Incidents of General Morgan's

career 318

A bravo deed 322

He wanted to see Morgan.. .. 323
Colonel Morgan buys a horse. 326

iiuickwork 327

One of Morgan's exploits.. . • 327

A noble dced..w 329

S«»lliiig a Federal general... . 331
Kxploit of one of Morgan's

men 331

'ITie Kentucky partisan 332

An honest foe better than a

false friend 335

General Morgan's escape
from the Ohio peniten-
tiary 336

Deatli of General Morgaa .. 346



A patriotic fellow 349

Narrow escape of Van Dom. 349

Jackson's strategy 352

A thrilling event 355

Don't believe it 357

Stuart's ride around McClel-

lan 358

llie mountain partisan 366

Anecdote of Mosby 368

Innocent for once 369

A natural movement 369

A raid into Kentucky 370

Promptsettlementofaclaim'. 384

Not wounded 385

The return.... 385

A kind of a sentinel 387

A friendly warning 387

rreferred to die on the field.. 388

The death of Ashby 389

The romantic Mosby 391

The barefooted boys 394

Harry Gilmor attacks the

enemy 395

General Hardee and Uie Ar-
kansas soldier 401

Charging endways 402

Mosby in the Federal lines. . » 403

Jackson 405\

He saw Jackson. 406 1



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10



CONTENTS.



PART IT.
THE GRAYJACKETS ON THE HIGH SEAS.



Tlitf nayal Hglii on tho Mis-
sissippi river 407

The cmiae of the Alabama. . 412
The fight of the Hattoras

and the Alabama. 423

The river devils 424

Cheer np, my lads 426

Tlic attack on tho Tronnides.. 427
The cniiso of the Florida.. . . 429

Use for them 436

Two things that sounded

alike 437

A daring feat 438

Praise from an enemy 441

Semmes outwitting the Yan-
derbilt 441



A pleasant hoax all round 4 12

A bold dash 444

Anecdote of Stonewall Jack-
son 445

VIcksburg 447

The wreck of tlie Vesta..... 445

A burial at sea 451

Capture of gunboats in the

Rappahannock 4 52

Civille ilellum 460

The Confederate cruisers.. . . 461
Capture of the Underwriter. 463
Belle Boyd runs the blockade. 470
Capture of a blockade runner. 475
Lucky moment o|i board the
8umtcr 479



PART Y,
HOME LIFE IN DIXIE.



Scene in the South Carolina

convention 481

Prepared for it tliis time .... 482
llie Fredericksburg exiles... 483
fiUies written on the back of

aConfedcrcratc note.... 486
A Spartan dame and her

young 488

Tho arro!il of Marshal Kane. 489
A Baltimore unconquerable. 490
Proof ugainst Federal gal-
lantry 494

Charleston women under fire. 495
Queer drafting in Maryland.. 496
A Southern scene ...,...,.• 496
Death and burial of Stuart.. 499
A girl worth having. ..»•... 504

A romance of the war 505

A brave boy 506

Quite the youngest recruit in

the service 507

Bach for his own side 507

Home life in tlie South 508

A strange resemblance 510

The Rebel sock 510

N«^ Soutliern women 513



The little girl's kindness to

the soldiers.... , 515

Spirit of the women of Va ,.. 516
Travelling under a flag of

truce 516

Inauguration of Vrevidnit

Davis 524

An impudent follow 527

lA'tter from a brave wonuui. r»28

Spoken Hke Cornelia 529

The desolation in Tennessee. 529
Ben. McCuUoch and Joe Bax-
ter 531

llie empty sleeve 533

A narrow escape 535

Qraphic picture of a sacked

city 536

Saw the elephant 538

Banished from home 539

A city under fire 540

A travelled lady 546

Impressment by women 547

Evacuation of Savannah .... 649

Social life in Baltimore , 552

Harry Gilmor visits home... 565
Ashes of glory 573



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PART I.
NARRATIVES OF PERSONAL DARING

AND

A-DVENTUKE.



A DARING FEAT.



Among the many feats of personal gallantry which
marked the campaign of the fall of 1862, is the following,
which occurred on the night after the battle of Cedar Bun.

After the battle was over for that day, four members of
the twenty-seventh Ya. regiment, which had participated
in the hottest of the fight, took it into their heads to have a
little private reconnoissance into the Yankee lines on their
own account. Their names are Hospital Stewart Patton, of
Company D ; Color-bearer Powell, of Company G ; Lieuten*
ant Edgar, of Company E ; and Sergeant Davis, of Company
F. The enemy had been driven three miles, and the twenty
seventh regiment was resting for the night on the remote
Vno of the battle-field, next to their rear column. After
iiavclling cautiously for several hundred yards without
interruption, these four daring Confederate soldiers, having

11



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12 A DARING PEAT.

only two muskets in tbcir possession, passed into the Federal
lines. Shortly afterward they heard low talking in some
thiok underbrush, and immediately demanded: ''Who's
there ?" " Union pickets," was the quick rejoinder. " Ad-
vance, Union pickets, throw down your arms, and surrender,
or we will fire into you, for you are our prisoners," at once
exclaimed Patton. " Who are you — and how many of you 7"
asked the " Union picket," with evident alarm. " You will
soon find out," said Powell. " Wheel into line — cock. your
guns, and be prepared to fire at the word — ^steady, boys,
steady I" " Hold on 1" fiiirly shrieked the " Union pickets,"
" we are ooming — don't fire, for God's Siike 1" " Come on
then, at once, for we have no time to wait here in idle talk,"
broke in Edgar and Davis, simultaneously.

Immediately afterwards, one by one, they came forward,
throwing their muskets, side arms, etc., at the feet of Powell,
who received them with dignity, but convulsive laughter
concealed. One who seemed to be an officer stepped up to
Patton, and presented a brace of fine pistols and a ten dollar
United States note as a bribe to let him escape.

" No, no," said Patton, " you may keep your money, but
we will take both you and your pistols into our custody,"

When the last of the " Union picketa" had come forward,
and found such a disparity in the nianbers of captors and
captives, for a moment he seemed to hesitate whether to yield
or not. Instantly the click of two musket cocks was heard,
and two muzzles pointing directly at the doubting and
wavering captive. It is needless to add, that no one deposited
his arms on the heap quicker than he. In a few moments
thereafter these four intrepid Confederate ** rebels" marched
into the camp of the twenty-seventh, thirteen captured "Union
pickets," and handed them over to be sent to the rear.



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IN THB WRONG PLACE. 18



IN THE WRONG PLACE.

DUBING the battles of the Wilderness, in May, 1864, the
gallant Qeneral Gordon, of Georgia, made a brilliant and
successful attack upon the enemy^s right wing, and drcve it
back in disorder for several miles.

When the darkness had put an end to the battle. General
Gordon, accompanied only by a single courier, rode to the
front to look after his pickets, and, passing them through
mistake, rode into the Federal lines. Supposing them to be
his own men, ho rode on for some distance, when his courier
said, in a low tone: " General, these are Yankees." Paying
but little attention to this, he still rode on, when the courier
said again : '' General, I tell you these are Yankees. Can't
you see their clothes are too dark for our men 7" About
this time the General was made aware of his critical situa-
tion by hearing all around him such calls as " Bally here,
Pennsylvania regiment," etc. Preserving his presence of
mind, he whispered to his courier, '* Follow me quietly and
without a word, Beasely;" but his uniform attracted the
attention of the Federals, and they began to call out: '' Who
are your^ '' Halt 1 halt 1" etc. Seeing that he was now dis-
covered, General Gordon threw himself upon the side of his
horse, called out, '' Come on, courier," and putting spurs to
his gallant steed, dashed by the men into the woods and
made good his escape into his own lines, unharmed by the
showers of bullets sent after him.



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li A SOOUTING ADYENTimifc ON THE PENIKSULA.

FIGHTIN* OBER A BONB.

T^B following amusing dialogue is said to have actually
ooourred kt one of the leading hotels in Dixie, just after the
passage by Congress of the law for raising colored troops for
the Ck)nfederate service :

OuesL "Well, Jim, you ire going to join a colored
regiment at oilce, I suppose 7*'

Jim. *'Me, Masisa? no, liie nebber tink ob it at all.*'

Oueat. "Never thought of it? I am surprised I I sup-
posed all your people would embrace the first opportunity to
takd lip armd bagerly. But 'why ate you not going to
fight?"

Jim. " Well, Massa, I tell yer. Did yer ebber see two
dogs fightin' dber a bon^e ?"

OuesL "Yes, of courde ; but what hai9 that to do with it?"

Jim. "Why, don't yer see, Madsa? de bone nebber fight;
de bone take no part in de conflic'. De Nwf mi Soufare de
two doge fightiv! ober a tone ; vfe niggers are de bane ; wt dxmH
take no pari in ch tOnfluf /"



A SCOUTriTG AiJVENTtmB ON THE PENINSULA.

A dORRSSPONDBNT of the Sebna {Ala.) Reporter^ relates the
following :

" I may here mention an act of bravery which is worthy
the attention of the historian, whose duty it will be to
chronicle the daring and gallant feats accomplished by our
soldiery during this bloody struggle. It being of great
importance that our Commanding General should be well



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A SOOUTINa ADVENTURE ON THE PENINSULA. 15

informed ka to the locations and numbets of the enemy's
fotoe then landing near West Point, private Oussons and
Sergeant Hartley, of 6ur regiment, readily volunteered for
this dangerous service. They were both men universally
liked, and well fitted, by some experience of frontier life, for
this perilous duty. They loft the regiment at dusk en the
evening of the 6th, armed with their trusty rifles. Tho
night was clear, and a full moon shone on their figures aa
they disappeared from my view beneath the dark shadows
of the woods. This was the ladt I saw of poor Hartley^

" Pursuing theif way cautiously and in silence, they soon
reached tho enemy's outposts, which they succeeded in safely
passing. Once within the enemy's line, their progress was
somewhat slow, as greater caution had to be exorcised to
evade the numerous pickets, which were posted through tho
woods. It was near midnight, when these two brave scouts
reached the bank of the river. From the position they oc-
cupied, just below the crest of the bank, and within three
hundred yards of the enemy, they had a fine bird's eye view
of every thing that was going on. Two boats were rapidly
disembarking artillery and wagons, and forty-three were
lying off in the river. After remaining in this position for
about half an hour, the 6couts determined to pass a few hun*
drcd yards higher up the river, for the purpose of getting
nearer the enemy's forces, and learning something fVom their
conversation. To do this, it was necessary for them to with-
draw from the bank, and make a detour through the woods.
And while thus changing position, a most lamentable casu-
alty occurred. Passing continuously through the deep shade
o^ a narrow vista in the woods, just as the moon was going
down, their attention was attracted by the sharp click of a
gun lock, and, at the same instant, they discovered the faint



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IG HOW BUTLER WAS SOLD.

outline of four of the enemy, standing within five puces
of them. The scouts halted, side by side, with their guns
cocked and at the ' ready.' After a brief pause, one of the
fpur, who appeared to be in command, ordered the scouts to
advance. Oussons replied by a demand to surrender. There
was another pause ; then a quick motion on the part of tlio
Federals ; then four shots, almost simultaneous, and in an
instant later two more. At the first fire poor Uartlcy foil
dead, and two of the enemy bit the dust. Cussons reloaded,
and stepped behind a tree. While <uipping his gun at that
moment, the four men on the next picket post, attracted by
the firing, advanced at a run. Cussons waited until they
were within about fifteen paces, and then shot down the
foremost one. The others seeing their companion fall, turned
and fled without firing. By this time the entire picket was
aroused, and Cussons drew off some sixty or seventy yards
into the woods, when he laid down and waited until the
enemy had formed into squads, and carried the pursuit half
a mile beyond him. lie then quietly flanked up the river,
and passed around them, reaching our camp about sunrise,
evidently none the worse for the night's ^ ad venture. In the
fight of Wednesday, our forces took the remainder of the
picket (one company) prisoners, and firom them we learn that
two were killed and the other mortaUy wounded. One of
the killed was orderly sergeant of the company."



HOW BUTLER WAS SOLD.

General Butlbb had a dandy regiment in New Orleans —
one a little nicer in uniform and personal habits than any



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HOW BUTLER WAS SOLD. 17

oilier ; and so ably commanded, that it had not lost a man
by disease since leaving New England. One day, the colonel
of thb fine regiment came to headquarters, wearing the ex-



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