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gate to Rosemary Lane ; then up the centre ofthatlaneto Damside
and in a westerly direction up Damside to the north-west side of
Fleet Square, where the boundary commenced." The area is about
42 acres; population 1,981.

St. Anne's Church.

St. Anne's Church was consecrated by the Bishop of Chester
in August, 1796. There are not many mural tablets in this Church;
indeed there are only three. The first on the south side is as
follows : —



348 TIME-HONOURED LANCASTER.



this tablet

is erected by

John Baynes, of Blackburn,

to the memory of

his beloved mother,

Isabella, wife of Thomas Baynes,

of this town,

who died september i ith, 1850,

aged 63 years.

" Her children arise up and call her blessed."

Proverbs chap, j/, v. 28.

On the north wall is this memorial : —

THIS TABLET IS ERECTED

BY THE MEMBERS OF ST. ANNE'S CONGREGATION

TO THE MEMORY OF

The Rev. Robt. Housman, A.B.,

THE FOUNDER AND FOR FORTY-ONE YEARS THE BELOVED MINISTER

OF THIS CHAPEL.

HIS NAME AND LABOURS AKE INTIMATELY ASSOCIATED WITH THE

PROGRESS OF " PURE AND UNDEFILED RELIGION " IN THIS TOWN.

BORN FEBRUARY 25TH, 1759, DIED APRIL 23RD, 1838.

" He was a good man and full of the Holy Ghost and faith ; and
much people was added unto the Lord. "- — Acts //. , v. 24.

Some excellent ministers have served this Church and Parish.
Among whom, without any risk of invidiousness, may be mentioned
the former, whom the above marble can only faintly commemorate
when compared to his life-work which forms his more abiding
memorial, since his " works do follow him " truly. Then we re-
member the scholarly Dr. Hathornthwaite, and the genial Canon
Pedder.

On the north side of the chancel is a brass shield bearing
this inscription : —



TIME-HONOURED LANCASTER. 349



M. N. HATHORNTHWAITE

OB : MORICAMBI^,

APRIL XXIV., MDCCCLXIV.,

JET. XX.,

IN JESU

WHEN SHE WAS ABOUT TO DEPART SHE SAID,

HAR

AND

" ALL IS WELL,"

AND

"I AM QUITE HAPPY,"

AND

"OH! HOW I HAVE BEEN WISHING TO SING AGAIN 'THEREFORE WITH

ANGELS AND ARCHANGELS.'"

"WHERE, LOVE?" SAID HER FATHER. POINTING UPWARDS

TO THE CLEAR SUNSHINE THROUGH THE WINDOW, SHE SAID

" THERE ! "

THEN SHALL THE RIGHTEOUS SHINE FORTH AS THE SUN IN THE
KINGDOM OF THE FATHER.

Written by her in Greek on the cover of her Greek Testament.

Under the ledge of the lectern, facing the Church are these
words : —

TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN MEMORY OF ANNE WAKEFIELD,
THIS LECTERN IS OFFERED IN COMPLIANCE WITH THE WISH OF HER
DAUGHTER JANE, WHO LOVED HER.

There are about sixty pews in the body of the Church, not
including the four choir stalls, and about fifty in the gallery. The
commandments are at the west end of the Church. It is proposed
to rebuild the sacred edifice and give it a less secular appearance
externally.

The Rev. Leigh Richmond preached in St. Anne's Church,
on the 25th of August, 18 16, and the Bishop of Lichfield and
Coventry on the 16th of August, 1834.



35o TIME-HONOURED LANCASTER.



The parish of St. Anne's is " bounded on the north by St.
St. Leonardg'ate and St. Nicholas Street, and on the south by
Nelson Street and Dalton Square ; on the west by Penny Street,
and on the east by the canal, which forms the natural boundary on
that side of the parish." Population of the parish 3,938.

The organ presented to St. Anne's, in 1802, was the gift of
John Dent, Esq., M.P. This organ was disposed of at the altera-
tion of the Church to its present form in 1875, and the one now in
use was built by Messrs. Bevington & Sons, of London, and cost
about ;£ 1,500.

Further particulars concerning St. Anne's Church will be
found in the biographical notes on the Rev. Robert Housman.

St. Thomas' Church.

On the 3rd of March, 1840, the foundation stone of St.
Thomas' Church, Lancaster, was laid by Edward Dodson Salisbury,
Esq., assisted by J. Drinkwater, Esq., and the Masonic brethren.
Those who took part in the procession from the Town Hall were
the Charity School girls, the girls of the National School, boys of
the same school, operative masons, contractors, Lodge of Free-
masons, Mr. Wheeler's pupils, wearing white rosettes, and pre-
senting a peculiarly neat and orderly appearance. The architect of
the new church was Edmund Sharpe, Esq. The Mayor, Joseph
Dockray, Esq., and the Hearts of Oak Club also took part in the
procession and proceedings. The weather was very fine. The
Rev. J. N. G. Armytage made an excellent speech after the laying of
the stone, which ceremony was carried out with full masonic
honours. The inscription on the plate is or was as follows : —

GLORIA IN EXCELSIS DEO.

ST. THOMAS' CHURCH, LANCASTER.

THE FOUNDATION STONE OF THIS CHURCH

DEVOTED TO THE WORSHIP OF ALMIGHTY GOD



TIME-HONOURED LANCASTER. 351



ACCORDING TO THE RITES OF THE UNITED

CHURCH OF ENGLAND AND IRELAND,

RAISED BY PUBLIC SUBSCRIPTION, UPON

LAND GIVEN BY

GEORGE MARTON, OF CAPERNWRAY HALL, ESQ., M.P.,

AND ENDOWED BY ELIZABETH SALISBURY

(RELICT OF EDWARD SALISBURY, OF LANCASTER, ESQ.),

WAS LAID BY

EDWARD DODSON SALISBURY, ESQ.,

ASSISTED BY THE W.M. OF THE LODGE OF FORTITUDE (NO. 35O).

AND THE OFFICERS AND BRETHREN OF THE LODGE,

ON SHROVE TUESDAY, MARCH 3RD,

A.D., MDCCCXL.,

IN THE THIRD YEAR OF THE REIGN OF

QUEEN VICTORIA,

A DONOR, AS DUCHESS OF LANCASTER, OF ^150.

JOHN BIRD SUMMER, D.D., LORD BISHOP OF CHESTER,

REV. JOHN MANBY, A.M., VICAR,

REV. THOMAS MACKRETH, B.D., RURAL DEAN,

JOSEPH DOCKRAY, ESQ., MAYOR,

EDMUND SHARPE, M.A., ARCHITECT.

The Church is a fine spacious edifice, having - a cheerful
appearance, but the pews are of the old-fashioned kind, and most
of them very much after the style met with in our unrestored
country churches. On the south side of the chancel is a brass
memorial inscribed thus : —

IN LOVING MEMORY

OF

THOMAS HOWITT,

F.R.C.S.

DIED MAY, XXIX,

MDCCCLXXXL,

ERECTED BY HIS DAUGHTERS,

F. R. MASON,



352 TIME-HONOURED LANCASTER.



AND

S. L. HASTINGS.

"BE THOU FAITHFUL

UNTO DEATH AND I

WILL GIVE THEE

A CROWN OF LIFE."

Another memorial appears on the wall on the north side, at
the head of the north aisle. It was

ERECTED BY MEMBERS OF THE CONGREGATION IN AFFECTIONATE

REMEMBRANCE OF

CHRISTOPHER BAYNES,

WHO DIED 5TH SEPTEMBER, I 885,

AGED 74 YEARS.

From the opening of this Church in 1841, he was a devout member
of the congregation. For 21 years he faithfully served the office of
Churchwarden, and for 43 years he was a diligent and earnest
teacher in the Sunday School. His life of simplicity and Christian
integrity will be long remembered in this parish and town.

On the north side of the Chancel is a brass stating that : —

THIS CHURCH

FOUNDED BY MRS. ELIZABETH SALISBURY,

A.D., 184O,

became after her decease the property of its incumbent
the rev. colin campbell. m.a.,
of trinity college, cambridge,
who on condition of five hundred pounds being raised by
the inhabitants of lancaster guaranteed the erection of an
elegant spire, designed by messrs. sharpe and paley, of this
town, architects, and in every hope of full success he duly
laid the foundation stone thereof, on monday, april 26th,
1852, john herdman sherson, esquire, being mayor, and a
donor of ten pounds towards the undertaking.

Thomas Howitt. \

p T ' } CHURCHWARDENS.

Edmund Jackson, J



TIME-HONOURED LANCASTER.



.5DO



In the Vestry is a framed portrait and plan o( the Church
dated 1853. From it we learn that the dimensions arc as follow : —

Extreme length from E. to W 116ft. 4m.

Length of Porch 15ft. 21'n.

Length of Nave 74ft. 6in.

Length of Chancel 26ft. Sin.

Extreme width of Church. N. to S 42ft. 3111.

Width of Chancel 17ft. 5111.

The Spire was completed on the 26th May, 1853.

Round the lower portion of the Pulpit are these words :—

"Blessed is the people j that know the joyful sound [ they
shall walk, O Lord, in the Light of Thy Countenance. — Ps. 89, 15."

On one occasion the pulpit was occupied by the Rev. J. C.
Bellew, and it is computed that the number present was 1,300.

In the south gallery is a two-light memorial window,
designed by the Rev. C. Campbell. It perpetuates the name of
Harriet, daughter of Abraham Hume, of Bilton Grange, grand-
daughter of the Rev. Charles Wheeler, Prebendary of York, born
1808, married 30th October, 1832 ; died November 10th, 1855.
This lady was Mr. Campbell's wife.

The Centre Gallery is adorned with the Royal Arms, dated
1852.

The Organ bears these tablets in brass :—

"JOHN BANFIELD,

BIRMINGHAM, FECIT, 1S52."

REBUILT BY

RICHARD TUBB, OF LIVERPOOL,

A.D., 1883.

REV. JOHN BONE, VICAR.

JAMES HATCH, \ CHURC „ WARDENS<

CHRISTOPHER BAVXES, )



A 2



;54 TIME-HONOURED LANCASTER.



The Rev. John Bone, present Vicar, is a Surrogate of the
Diocese of Manchester, a Theological Associate of King's College,
London, and F.R.A.S. He was formerly at Southport. Population
of Parish, 3,315.

St. Thomas' District School was erected by S. Simpson,
Esq. On a marble tablet is this commemoration : — " In memory
of Maria Simpson who through divine grace sought to bring up
herself in the nurture and admonition of the Lord by instruction in
His revealed word and attention on His appointed ordinances this
scheme for the education of youth in the Holy Scriptures and in the
principles of the Church of England is erected as the most suitable
monument of such a parent by a grateful son, 1843." The Sunday
School was opened on the 6th of August, 1843. Jubilee Com-
memoration Services were held on Sunday the 14th June, 1891,
when the Rev. Colin Campbell, M.A., a former incumbent, preached
in the morning, and the Rev. H. Vincent Beechey, M.A., in the
evening. On the 15th inst. there was a congregational gathering
at the Vicarage, and on the 16th an organ recital, followed by a
full choral service, in which the choirs of other churches assisted.
The preacher on this occasion was the Rev. Canon Cross, D.D.,
of Southport. A'children's flower service was held on the 17th,
when a sermon was preached by the Rev. C. O. L. Riley, M.A.

List of Incumbents oy the Three Churches.

These lists have been obtained direct from the respective
clergymen of the several Churches.

St. John's.

The Rev. William Johnson, appointed June 16th, 1755; Rev.
John Gibson, June 22nd, 1765, died March 7th, 1787, aged 68;
Rev. \Y. Hutton, February 21st, 1787; Rev. Thomas Saul, 1807,
(see Clark's Lancaster) ; Rev. John Atkinson, March 25th, 1808,
died February 8th, 1812 ; Rev. James Thomas, April nth, 1812 ;



TIME-HONOURED LANCASTER. 355



Rev. George Morland, June 2(>th, 1824; Rev. Edward Pedder,
vicar, 1862 (interred at Heysham) ; Rev. William Harris Ewald,
present incumbent, appointed in 1880.

Mr. Morland was the recipient of a very hearty testimonial
after ten years' ministry. On June 21st, 1834, his congregation
presented him with an elegant tea service. On the 24th of
February, 184S, the same gentleman was presented with a
solar lamp thus inscribed : — " Presented to the Rev. George Mor-
land by the teachers of the Hoys' National Sunday School as a
token of esteem and to mark their sense of his uniform kindness
during many years as their superintendent." The presentation was
made by T. Swainson, Esq. The chapelry districts of St. John's
and St. Anne's were fixed on the 20th August, 1842. Mr. Morland
died on the 5th of October, 1862, aged 72. He was brother to
the Rev. John Morland, perpetual curate of Aughton.

St. Anne's.

Rev. RobertHousman, founder and minister, 41 years ; Rev.
- Levington ; Rev. Collinson, until 1834 ; Rev. Henry O'Neil,
1837, resigned 15th February, 1840; Rev. C. Bury, from St.
Luke's, Skerton, inducted 3rd May, 1840; Rev. A. S. Page, 1837 ;
Rev. Dr. Hathornthwaite, 1864, died 1884 ; Rev. J. Francis, M.A.,
1875 to ^83 ; Rev. Robert Park, M.A., present vicar. St.
Anne's School was built in 1853 in Edward Street.

St. Thomas's.

Opened in April, 1841. Rev. J. N. G. Armytage ; Rev.
Colin Campbell, inducted 27th April, 1845 ; Rev. William Ogden,
B.A.; Rev. Colin Campbell, 1858 ; Rev. J. Bone, appointed in 1872,
present incumbent. St. Thomas' Parsonage was erected in 1853.
The Marton family presented the land on which the Church stands,
land valued at ^350.



356 TIME-HONOURED LANCASTER.



The Rev. Colin Campbell was instituted April 27th, 1845.
This gentleman came here from Gainsborough. The Church was
liberally endowed by a lady with ;£ 1,000, which endowment was
absorbed in the purchase of the vicarage house and grounds, and is
the sole endowment attached to the Church. She also added to her
pecuniar}- gifts a beautiful suite of communion service on the 26th
May, 1 84 1.

Christ Church.

Christ Church was built by the late Mr. Samuel Gregson,
M.P. in 1857, at a cost of ^5,000. The interior consists of a
chancel, nave, and north and south transepts. A south aisle was
added in 1889. The east window — a three-light window with a trefoil
head — represents " Christ restoring Lazarus." It is a very neat
one. At each extremity there is a memorial window in three lights.
The one on the left is in memory of the founder of the church, who
died February 8th, 1865, aged 72 years. Another in this church
was erected in memory of Ann Kirks, widow of Morecroft Kirks,
Esq., R.N., who died at Moorlands, 1859, aged 76.

The Rev. Dr. Lee was the first vicar. He resigned in 1S72,
and was succeeded by the Rev. P. Bartlett, M.A.

The Church was built for the benefit of Grammar School
pupils and for the inmates of the Workhouse, quite as much as for
the vicinal residents who ultimately formed a new parochial district
including the Freehold, Springfield Terrace, Greenfield and East
Road, with adjoining houses. About twenty years ago the upper
school rooms and play-ground, formerly the property of Dr. Lee,
were purchased for the new parish at a cost of ^900. The Infants'
Day School has built in, above its entrance, the lintel stone of the old
Grammar School which bears the date 1682. The Primrose Hill
district and that of Bowerham, too, having increased so rapidly
during the past ten years, it has been decided to erect a new church
in Dale Street, on land presented in 1890 by Mr. Edward Storey.



TIME-HOXOURED LANCASTER.



3.57



Three years ago a Mission Room was opened in Hope Street
and it is usually well attended by the Primrose Hill parisioners of
Christ Church.

The patronage of Christ Church is in the hands of Mrs.
Murray, of West Hall, Weybridge, Surrey, only daughter of the
founder, Samuel Gregson, Esq., M.P. Population of Parish, 4, 126.



The respective value of the Church livings in Lancaster is as



follows



St. Mary's Church
St. John's Church
St. Anne's Church
St. Thomas's Church
Christ Church
St. Luke's (Skerton)



£



!20



£ 180

£ 200

£ 430

£ 187



(Population of St. Mary's parish is 7,290).

Congregationalism in Lancaster.

The history of Congregationalism is remarkably interesting
in regard to Lancaster, and bespeaks energy and faith of a striking
nature. The Independents first met in a room in St. Leonardgate,
but about the year 1772-3 Mr. John Dawson, of Aldcliffe Hall,
enabled the little band of Lancaster Noncomformists to commence
erecting a Chapel in High Street, and a deed concerning the land
devoted for the sacred object bears Mr. Dawson's name and the
date, May 5th, 1777. The first settled minister appears to have
been the Rev. George Burder, who filled the office of pastor from
May 30th, 1778, until 1783, and was voted a salary of £50 per
annum. This gentleman was succeeded by the Rev. Peter Samuel
Charrier in 1790 (ordained May 12th, 1792). He seems to have
remained minister until his death, which took place on the 2()th
March, 1826, his age being 56. Then came the Rev. Joseph France,
M.A., in the year 1812, followed by the Rev. Samuel Bell, in January,

*Clergy List, 1S91.



Jo



8 TIME-HONOURED LANCASTER.



1823, who remained until March, 1845. After him we find the Rev.
James Fleming-, of Highbury College, ordained in Lancaster,
August 26th, 1845. He resigned the pastorate in 1853. The Rev.
John Sugden, B.A., who had been a missionary in India took his
place, entering on his duties on the 2nd of February, 1854. His
public recognition followed on the 8th of June, in the same year.
Mr. Sugden resigned office on the 1st of May, i86j, and was
succeeded by the Rev. David Harding on the 26th June, 1863, who
remained until the 23rd February, 1866. On the 18th of September,
1866, we have the Rev. Elvery Dothie, B.A., who resigned in April,
1872, succeeded by the Rev. Francis Bolton, and the latter by the
Rev. J. F. Cowley, on the 12th July, 1885.

The Rev. H. Hunt appears to have been followed by the
Rev. George Burder, minister from the 30th of May, 1778,
until the year 1783. He was the author of " Village Sermons,"
and "The Good Old Way." The latter work led, it is sup-
posed, to the founding of the Religious Tract Society. Mr.
Burder went from Lancaster to Coventry, and was succeeded
by the Rev. Thomas Bryson, a gentleman born at Dalkieth, and
who died in London 24th April, 1799. Next there came the Rev.
Peter Samuel Charrier, who was born in London 24th February,
1770. He was ordained at Lancaster 9th May, 1792, married a
Lancaster lady (Miss Padgett), and died in Liverpool 29th March,
1826. Then we find the Rev. Joseph France, M.A., born at Black-
burn 13th July, 1 789, minister from 30th August, 181 5, until
August, 1819. He was followed by the Rev. Samuel Bell, born 3rd
June, 1793, at Leeds. He ministered here from August, 1823,
until March, 1845. Dr. Bell died 22nd of July, 1861, at Stockwell.
His successor was the Rev. James Fleming, ordained 26th August.
1845, resigned 29th September, 1S53. He likewise became a Doctor
of Divinity. The Rev. John Sugden, B.A.. who had been a
missionary in India, succeeded and remained at High Street from
2nd February, 1854, until 1st May, 1861. During his time the
Middle Street and High Street Schools were erected in 1856, at a cost
of ;£ 1,300. He was the author of The Chunk Guide and Manual.



TIME-HONOURED LANCASTER. 359



Next we find the Rev. David Harding, a gentleman who was horn
at Dursley, in Gloucestershire, 3rd April, 1831, ministering- from 25th
June, 1863, until 23rd February, 1866. The Rev. Elvery Dothie,
M.A., appears in succession, and was pastor from 8th October,
1866, until April, 1872. He removed to South Norwood, and was
followed by the Rev. Francis Bolton, M.A., who entered on his
duties in September, 1872, and remained until 29th June, 1884.
The present minister at High Street is the Rev. j. F. Cowley,
whose advent in Lancaster dates from the 12th July, 1885. 1 am
indebted for these fuller particulars as concern dates in this
paragraph to the Rev. B. Nightingale.

Centenary Church.

The Rev. Adam Scott, first minister, came in July, 1873, an< ^
remained until October, 1S83. The Rev. H. W. Smith succeeded
in February, 1884, and is still the respected minister.

To the CongregationaJists of Lancaster belongs the credit of
establishing Sunday Schools in the year 1788. A Mr. Alexandre
was so much interested in the work of Robert Raikes that he
determined in an humble way to supplement the same. He was,
however, much maligned by parties not of his way of thinking, and
the town was actually billed over with the following notice :—
" Beware of the cunning people at High Street who want to kidnap
your children."

The Rev. James Gregory, the Rev. James Calvert, and the
Rev. Robert Dawson, B.A., all date their ministerial births from
High Street Church.

Wesleyanism in Lancaster.

The introduction of Wesleyanism is quite as-indicative of the
earnestness of the Lancaster subscribers to the belief of Wesley as
one could expect, or indeed can find anywhere else in connection



360 TIME-HONOURED LANCASTER.



with the history of Methodism. The first meeting" place of Lan-
caster Wesleyans was in two cottages at the corner of Wood Street
and Damside Street, and now the premises, or portions thereof, of
Mr. Verity, tobacco manufacturer. There were two ministers who
were appointed to develop the cause in Lancaster and the district
assigned to it, and these gentlemen lived for a time in the lower
storeys of the building wherein the services were held. In 1805,
they found matters much improved, and their first chapel in this
town dates from that year.

On the 29th of December, 1874, the elegant edifice in
Sulyard Street was opened, and the leading minister officiating on
the occasion was the Rev. Dr. Punshon. The Rev. Hugh Stowell
Brown occupied the pulpit shortly after, and the voices of many of
the foremost men Wesleyan tenets possess have resounded in
Sulyard Street new Chapel. Undoubtedly Lancaster has been the
seat of law and Gospel for ages, and if the legal element has
displayed the brilliant eloquence of Scarlett, Brougham, and Cres-
well, so has the Divine evinced no less glorious powers in the score
of pulpits founded for the proclamation o( laws made by the uner-
ring Lord Chief Justice, God.

The first couple who were married in the old Wesleyan
Chapel were Philip and Isabella Woodburn, and the date of the
marriage is March 12th, 1845. They w^ere presented with a Bible
and a Hymn Book to mark the importance of the occasion. This
Philip Woodburn was for many years town crier. The first couple
married in the new Chapel were James Ball and Jane Wilkinson,
both of Morecambe, the latter a widow. This was on the 5th of
January, 1875. A Bible and Hymn Book were also given on this
occasion, one of the gentlemen making the presentation, Mr. Bicker
dike, on behalf of the Trustees, having performed a similarly
pleasing duty on the occasion of the first marriage in the old Chapel.
The old Trustees of the first Wesleyan Chapel were seventeen in
number. Their names were — William Scott, school-master ; Richard
Toulmin, joiner ; James Milner, plumber ; John Cleminson, joiner ;



TIME-HONOURED LANCASTER. 361



and then come three Yorkshire farmers, John Gorrill, of High
Grains ; Thos. Heaps, of The Birks ; and Matthew Redman
of Sannett Hall, all of whom were ardent followers of John
Wesley's rules. Next we find the complement made up of ten
others -Joseph Dutton, Joseph Bancroft, Jonas Nuttall, John Ashton,
John Jones, Thomas Franceys, Samuel Healey, William Byrom,
Thomas Morrow, and Jas. Morrow, merchants, of Liverpool.

Sulyard Street occupies the site of the old friary of the
Dominican order, founded about the 44th Henry III., by Sir Hugh
Harrington, Knight, which was granted 18th June, 32nd Henry
VIII., to Thomas Holecroft and the site alientated 2 and 3 Phil et
Mar. to Thomas Carus, of Halton, and his son Thomas. Leland
mentions this house only in an incidental manner in his Itinerary,
vol. v. p. 99. Tanner quotes concerning it, the Pat. 44, Henry III.,
m. 18, vol. 19. Pat. 5, Edward III., p. 1, m. 19, licent pro manso
elargando. Pat. 12, Edward II., p. 2, m. 6 pardonat, pro per-
quisit, duarum acr, terrae pro manso elargando. Pat. 44, Edward
III., p. 2, vol. 3. Rec. Scacc. 7, Richard II., Hil rot 3. There
were, evidently, five monastic foundations in Lancaster, the Bene-
dictine priory of St. Mary, the convent of the Gray Friars, St.
Leonard's Hospital, Gardyner's Chantry, and this Dominican or
Black Friars'" Order, founded, according to Dugdale's Monasticon by
St. Dominic, a Spaniard born at Calagueraga, a small town in the
diocese of Osma, in Old Castile, about a.d. 1071. They were called
Dominicans from their founder, preaching friars from their office
to preach and convert heretics, and black friars from their garments.
From having their first house in France, situate in the Rue de St.
Jaques, Paris, they were called Jacobines. Their rule was chiefly
that of St. Augustine, and was approved of by Pope Innocent III.,
in the Lateran Council, a.d. 121 5, by word of mouth ; and by the
bull of Pope Honorius III., a.d. 12 16. At first they used the same
habit with the Austin Canons. About a.d. 12 19, they took another,
viz., a white cassock, with a white hood over it, and when they
went abroad, a black coat with a black hood over their white vest-
ments. They came into England a.d. 1221, had their first house



362 TIME-HONOURED LANCASTER.



at Oxford that year ; and at the dissolution had fifty-eight houses
here. Lord Wake intended to have brought Dominican nuns into
England, and held a license from the King to do so, but he does
not appear to have carried out his intention. The nuns of Dartford,
in Kent, were, however, said to represent this order. There can be



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