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GLENCREGGAN.



YOL. II.



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FEINTED BT SPOTTISWOODB AND CO.
NEW-STEEET SQUABB



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GLENCKEGGAN :



OB,



A HIGHLAND HOME IN CANTIRE.



CUTHBEllT BEDE.



Illustrated with Three Maps, Eight Chromolithographs, and
Sixty-one Woodcuts, from the Author's Drawings.



IX TWO VOLUMES.

VOL. II.



LONDON:

LONGMAN, GREEN, LONGMAN, AND ROBERTS.

1861.



CONTENTS



THE SECOND VOLUME.



CILiPTER XA^II.

cantire's monarch of mountains, and its legends.

A Highland Parish. — A native Poet. — Barr Glen. — Beinn-an-Tuirc.
— What is a Mountain ? — Hieland Hills. — Local Ehymes. — View
from the Summit. — Legend of the Wild Boar. — Fingal compasses
Diarmid's Death. — Diarmid a Victor. — Diarmid a Victim. — The
One-eyed. — Versions of the Legend. — Ossian. — Legend of Eobert
Bruce. — A friendly Goat. — Bruce and the Beggar-man. — A Dish
at a Pinch. — How to obtain an Answer to a Question. — Friends
in need. — Highland Hospitality. — Bruce and Mackay. — A royal
Bargain royally fulfilled. — Another Version of the Tale . Page 1

CHAP. XIX.

on the moors.

Inhabitants of Heather-land. — Gnats and Midges. — Recreations. —
Eccentricities of Midges. — A Sketcher's Miseries. — Queer Head-
gear. — The venomous Beast. — Mice and Moles. — A Curiosity in
Natural History, — The Mole and the Campbells. — A Mountain
A 4



vi CONTENTS OF

Burn — Its Birth and Career. — Trees in Heather-land. — The
Lady of the Woods. — The Eowan-tree. — Beeches and Wytch
Elms. —The Berry Family.— Ferns and other Plants. — Bog-
cotton, the Cana of the Poets. — Eagles. — Omithologj- of the
District. —Natural History of the same. — Scenery of the Moors. —
Maps on Boulders ...••• I'age 22



CHAP. XX.

GEOUSE-LAXD.

Highland Herd-girl. — Her pastoral Charge. — Not co'sred by Bidls. —
Highland Cattle. — Stots and Kyloes. —Rosa Bonhenr. — Highland
Kaids. — Winter Beef. — A sharp-witted Lad. — Highland Rams. —
Auld Hornie. — Scotch MuUs. — The Collie — His Attainments and
Duties — Some wondrous Anecdotes thereupon. — Shooting. — Game-
Bags. — True Sport versus Battue Slaughter. — Gentlemen not
Gamekeepers. — The Pleasures of Grouse-shooting. — St. Grouse
vindicated. — The Fox-himting of Shooting .. . .44



CHAP. XXI.

STILL-LIFE, AXD HIGHLAND DAINTIES.

Old Eudd. — Illicit Stills. — Moonlight, Mountain-dew, and Dajdight.

— Clishmaclarer. — A Fight with the Gangers. — The big Judge. —
The Excise. — Suiipression of Smuggling. — A Smuggler's Profits. —
Christopher North's Opinion. — The Worm i' the Bud, and the Still.

— Spoiling the Egyptians. — The Sportsman's Return — How to pack
Grouse. — How to heat it, and eat it. — Dinner Dainties. — Haggis
and singed Sheep's Head. — Salmon. — A rare Entertainment. — An
Ogreish Proposition. — Scotch Sweets. — The Sleep of a Grouse-
shooter . . . . . . . .70



THE SECOND VOLUME. Vll

CHAP. xxn.

CANTIRE BUCOLICS PAST AND PRESENT.

A Farm-house. — English Associations connected with the Word. — The
Highland Farm-house. — Tastes differ. — Highland Prejudice against
Pork. — Fingal and Ossian ate Pork. — Three pleasing Features in
Cantire. — Rents and Soums. — A Time of Scarcity. — Blood-cakes.

— Servants' Wages. — Farm Leases. — Rotation of Crops. — Enclo-
sures. — Soil. — - Sea-wrack for Manure. — Sheep-farming. — Agri-
cultural Implements. — The Caschrom. — Harrowing at the Horse's
Tail. — Creels. — A strong Man. — The Braidh. — The Quern. —
Present State of Agriculture in Cantire. — Condition of the Farmer
and Labourer ....... Page 89

CHAP. xxin.

HIGHLAND FARM-HOUSES.

The Farm-house. — Where ? — Dirty Approach. — Highland IVIilkmaid.

— On the Ground-floor. — An Interior. — Furniture and Tenants. —
Bare Legs. — Macbeth's Witcli. — Mrs. 3Iac. — The Mon, puir Body !

— The Spence. — A Four-poster. — Pound-cake and Sherry. — Can-
tire Hospitality. — No Canny. — Extremes. — Oatmeal Bannocks. —
What are they like ? — Milk, a popular Beverage. — Compulsory
Enjoyment. — How happy could I be with neither ! — The romantic
Tale of the brave Gii-1 of Barr Glen . . . . 110

CILU*. XXIV.

HIGHLAND COTTAGES.

Wretchedness of the Cottages. — Their Exterior. — Their Middens and
Kail-yards. — The Interior of a Highland Hut, with Figures. — The
Lassies and their Mither. — Bonnie. — Cottages a Century ago. —
Dr. Johnson, Garnett, and Pennant's Testimony. — An unwashed



Vlll CONTENTS OF

Bridegroom. — A Mahometan Paradise. — Dr. Parkins's Theory of
wholesome Unwholesomeness. — Bother d. — The Geography of Dirt.

— CalTinism and Cleanliness. — Christopher North's poetic Gilding.

— Lord Palmerston's sound Advice. — Landlords to the Kescue !

Page 128

CHAP. XXV.

ON THE ATLANTIC SHORE.

Mushrooms and Sea Air. — Bealla ^haghaochan Cave. — A Mountain
Stream. — By the sad Sea Waves. — Eeceding of the Sea. — Detached
■ Eocks — Their geological Character — Their botanical Character. —
The Blue Bell of Scotland— Its distinctive Marks. — Hairbell or
Harebell. — A Spot for a Pic Nic. — Kelp Gatherers. — Manufac-
ture of Kelp. — Wraic. — The Kelp Harvest. — Value of a Kelp
Shore. — Vraic in Jersey. — Hard Work. — Herrings and Wraic 146

CHAP, xx^nc.

COMMON OBJECTS ON AND OFF THE SEA-SHORE.

Otters — Their Dens. — Otter-himting. — Dogs. — The Master-otter,
or King of the Otters. — The Note of an Ott«r. — Seals and Seal-
shooting. — Fish Varieties. — The Scotch Minister interrupted. —
Lobsters and Crabs. — Imprisoned Voyagers. — The Gulf-stream. —
The Voyage of the Seed. — Tropical Plants on Highland Shores. —
Hugh MiUer. — Dr. NeilL — Kev. C. Kingsley. — Mr. Campbell. —
Westerly Cui-rents and Gales. — Unsafe Anchorage. — Luminous
Appearance of the Sea. — Medusae. — Poetical Extracts . 166

CHAP. xxvn.

MUASDALE; A WATERING-PLACE IN CLOUDLAND.

The bending Line of Shore. — An ideal Watering-place. — The Highland
Abeiystwith. — Muasdale's Superiorities. — Lions of the Neighbour-
hood. — Climate and Longevity. — Necessities and Attractions. — A



THE SECOND YOLUJIE. IX

Prophecy. — Killean Manse. — The minor Prophets. — Muasdale
Village. — A Farina Mill. — Legend of the foiirteen Farmers of Muas-
dale. — Clachaig Glen. — Legend of Beith and the Arch-fiend. — The
two Bridges. — The dry Bones of a Sketch. — How to manufacture a
Picture. — Plenty of Smoke. — Half-price Distinction . Page 184

CHAP. XXYIII.

KILLEAN A SCOTCH KIRK AND SABBATH.

A romantic and unexpected Road. — Fisherman's Wife. — Detached
Hocks. — Their Beauty and Geology. — Legends anent them. — Vi-
trified Fort. — A botanical Witness to Man. — Nature's Testimony to
human Vices. — Weeds follow the Steps of Man. — The Shore. —
Killean Free Church. — The Village. — Killean Church. — A faithfial
Minister. — St. Killian. — The Presbyterian Service. — Liberty of
Conscience. — Hymnology and Singing — Objections to Organs. —
Sir Walter Scott's Opinion. — Presbyterian " Simplicity." — Reality
and acting. — Scotch Liturgy. — Standing in Prayer. — Ancient Cus-
toms, — The revival Movement in Cantire. — A Gaelic Open-air Ser-
■vice — Its Characteristics. — The Covenanters , . 202

CHAP. XXIX.

LARGIE.

Bradge House. — Tayinloan Village. — The Pig of Cantire. — Largie
Castle. — The Macdonalds. — Proposal to shoot Largie with a Piece
of Silver. — Popular Tales and the Tellers of Sgeidachdan. — The
Fairies of Largie. — The Laird of Largie and the '45. — Another
Version. — Macdonald's Pipers. — An Highland Improvisatore. —
The learned Gentleman and MacMurchy. — The Story of the Laird
of Largie and the Beggar Captain. — The Macdonald's Grants of
Property. — Model legal Documents. — The Hangman's Rock 227



X CONTENTS OF

CHAP. XXX.

A CANTER THROUGH CANTIRE.

A -wet Prospect. — The Glass low ; Spirits ditto. — Proverbial Pliila-
begs. — Fortune's Favourites. — On the Eoad. — Khunahourine Point.

— Kilealmonell Parish. — Claehan. — Dunskeig Hill. — Vitrified
Fort. — West Tarbert Loch — Its Scenery. — Ard Patrick. — The
Land of the Campbells. — The King of Trees for the Painter. —
Euskin and Turner. — "VVliitehouse. — Laggavouliu. ~ The Hill of
Love. — Tarbert. — An End at the Beginning . . Page 242

CHJLP. XXXI.

EAST TARBERT AXD LOCH-FYNE HERRINGS.

Tarbert ; meaning of the "Word. — Scott's Account. — The Legend of
Tarbert. — A Blaclvleg Transaction. — Fables and Facts. — Shak-
speare's Donalbain. — The Norwegian Dynasty. — Sodor and 3Ian. —
The Bishop of Cantire. — The Tarbert Canal Company, Limited. —
A Chain of Forts. — Paul Jones the Pirate, — Tarbert Castle. — The
Key of Cantire.— The Eastern Loch ; its wild Character. — Tarbert
Tow^l — The Capital of Hen-ingdom. — Statistics of the Fishery. —
Phosphorescence of the Herring. — Superstitions of the Fishermen.—
Old Form of Prayer on putting to Sea. — The King of the Herrings.

— Folk-lore of the Herring. — Things not generally knoA\-n anent the
Herring. — A cleanly Lodging. — The Merry Dancers . . 257

CHAP. xxxn.

THE KYLES OF BUTE.

How to leave Tarbert. — The Zona. — A Herring-laden Steamer. —
Tarbert Quay. — Street Slaughtering.— Our Caliban. — East Tarbert
Loch. — Loch Fyue. — Aird Laniont. — Last View of Cantire. —



THE SECOND VOLUME.



XI



Eough Water. — Entrance to the Kjles. — Calais and the Kyles. —
Scenery and Sea Sickness. — Formation of the Kyles. — A Loch-y
Labyrinth. — Travellers' Opinions as to the Kyles. — Pennant. —
Lord Teignmouth. — Miss Sinclair. — Gushing Eaptures. — Mac-
culloch. — A Fairy-like Sea. — Sir George Head. — Passage of the
Kyles. — Rothesay. — The Poet Prince. — The tragical Story of the
first Duke of Eothesa)^ — My LordJBute reads my Lady a Lesson. —
Toward Point. — The Fii-th of Clyde . . . Page 282



AppEXDrx .

The Cantire Life-boat

Dermid ; a Poem

The Macdonalds

The Ecelesiology of Cantire

Geology of Cantire

Nelson's Handbook



303
305
307
323
328
342
348



Index



351



LIST or ILLUSTRATIONS



THE SECOND VOLUME.



CHKOMO-LITHOGRAPHS.

Off to the Moors ....... Frontispiece

View on the Glencreggan Moors, Cautire . . To face page 41

Largie Castle, Cantire ...... 228



WOODCUTS PEINTED AS PLATES.
{Drawn on the wood by Mr. J. Willis Brooks. Engraved by Branston.)
Interior of a West Highland Cottage, Cantire . To face page 132



Kelp-gathering on the Western Coast of Cantire
Clachaig Glen, Muasclale, Cantire
Killean, Cantire ....
East Loch Tarbert, on Loch Fyne, Cantire



157
198
210
267



WOODCUTS PEINTED IN THE TEXT.

Subject. Drawn on the wood by Page

The Mutch, (Back View) . . . C. Bede . . 1

Out on the Moors . . . . „ . .23

One of the Pleasures of Moorland sketching . „ . .27

Denizens of Grouse-land . . . ,, . .44



XIV



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.



Subject. Drawn on the wood by

Highland Herd-girl . . . . C. Bede

Strange Things come up to look at us
The Scotch Shepherd of feucy
The Scotch Shepherd of reality
Still-life in the Highlands.— "Still I love thee !"
English Tourist and Highland Waiter
The Caschrom, and Han-owing at the Horse'

Tail
The Quern (from Pennant)
Highland Milkmaid, as she appeared before

my mind's eye
Highland Milkmaid, as she appeared before

my pencil .
A Visit to a Farm-house
"Bony lady, indeed ! "
Kelp-gatherers .
The fashionable Lobster-pot
View from Beallachaghaochan to Muasdale

and Killean
A Blue Bonnet over the Border
Between Muasdale and Killean
Open-air preaching in Cantire
A Piper
East Tarbert, Cantire



Page
46
53
55
56
72
85

102
106

112

113
116
134
157
173

186
202
204
223
.242
269



MAP.



Geology of Cantire



To face ^age 342



GLENCREGGAN.



CHAPTER XVIII.

cAjS'Tike's monarch of mountains, and its legends.

A Higliland Parish. — A native Poet. — Barr Glen. — Beinn-an-Tuirc.
— What is a Mountain ? — Hieland Hills. — Local Ehj-mes. — View
from the Summit. — Legend of the Wild Boar. — Fingal compasses
Diarmid's Death. — Diarmid a Victor. — Diarmid a Victim. — The
One- eyed. — Versions of the Legend. — Ossian. — Legend of Robert
Bruce. — A friendly Goat. — Bruce and the Beggar-man. — A Dish
at a Pinch. — How to obtain an Answer to a Question. — Friends
in need. — Highland Hospitality. — Bruce and Mackay. — A royal
Bargain royally fulfilled. — Another Version of the Tale.

'here is abundant variety in the landscape
that I am endeavouring- to sketch. It
might be said of the parish in which Glen-
creggan is situated, as Christopher North
said of his o-svn native place (only for " loch " we must
read " sea ") : " It was as level, as boggy, as hillj^,
as mountainous, as w^oody, as lochy, and as rivery a
parish, as ever laughed to scorn Colonel Mudge and his
Trigonometrical Survey." And this applies to the
vol. II. B




2 GLENCREGGAN.

general features of the landscape, which, in its details,
is much as follows.

The hill-side falls sharply from our feet into a valley
(high above the sea) along which, in an easterly direc-
tion, runs a good road from the village of Barr for
some four or five miles, communicating with several
farm-houses on the Glenbarr estate. A few yards on
the other side of the road is Barr river, hurrying on in
its downward course towards the sea, over rocky frag-
ments and ledges, and, for the most part, fringed and
overhung with trees and hazel bushes up to its source.
It is fed by many tributary streams, the chief of which
flows from Loch Coiribh ; but the main source of Barr
River is Loch Arnicle, a wild and lonely loch at the
western foot of the mountain Beinn-an-Tuirc.

A local poet, who has not much of the fire of Burns,
or the ancient Scalds, thus celebrates the lochs of
Cantire : —

" The many lakes that stud Cantire,
No man ■would grudgingly admire,
But spare an hour for to retire

And take a view,
Which -would his frame with health inspire,
And strength renew."

The same poet — whose success in verse is not equal
to his good intentions — has also tuned his strings in
praise of the glens of Cantire : —



'



BEINN-AN-TUIRC. 3

" Cantire's glens perfume the air
With roses sweet, and gowans fair ;
Their fertile sides, and crystal streams.
Dress' d with the sun's life-giving beams,
Delight the heart and eye.
A walk then on the field
Would health and vigour yield —
A feast of joys supply."

Barr Glen is cultivated throughout its whole extent,
and has extensive sheep pasturage on either side. In
this cultivated tract, farm-houses and cottages are
dotted about near to the road side, leaving the hills to
loneliness and heather. The river runs along the valley-
far below us ; on its further side the hills again rise to
a considerable height. They range from right to left,
terminating five miles from us in Beinn-an-Tuirc, near
to whose base the shooting-party this morning com-
menced their day's sport.

Beinn-an-Tuirc is the most considerable hill in
Cantire, being 2170 feet above the level of the sea,
and only 306 feet lower than the Paps of Jura; but
as it does not rise abruptly from its base, but towers out
of a confused mass of lofty hills, it appears of less
altitude than other mountains that are its inferior in
height, but are better seen from standing alone. It
has also been omitted in the tables of the Scotch moun-
tains and hills, which give various altitudes down to
that of Arthur's Seat, which is 823 feet above the sea.

B 2



4 GLENCKEGGAN.

Why, this nameless hill on which we are now seated
is much higher than that; and yonder hill on the
other side of the Barr Glen is still higher !

What is a hill, indeed ; and what a mountain ? at
what altitude does a hill end and a moimtain com-
mence ? in fact, at what altitude does a rise of ground
become a hill ? In the flat fen counties of England,
it takes a very small proportion of earth to be dignified
with the title of a hill. The Cambridge man when he
lionises his country cousins, shows them the Grogmagog
Hills ; and they look over the gently rising fields to
which he is pointing, and strain their eyes in the vain
expectation of seeing a blue range worthy of the name
of hills. The Cambridge man makes a tour, ascends
Mont Blanc, becomes a member of the Alpine Club,
and scorns the Grampians as mere hillocks. While, in
a land of mountains like the Highlands, what would be
a mountain in lowland counties, dwindles to a hill.
Thus, that young Scotch minister who is one of our
most accomplished and genial essayists says, " I am
writing north of the Tweed, and the horizon is of blue
hills, which some Southrons would call mountains." *
And Christopher North, speaking of his boyhood's
home "among moors and mountains," says, "moun-
tains they seemed to us in those days, though now we
believe they are only hills. But, such hills! undu-
* Eecreations of a Coxmtry Parson, p. 126.



HIELAND HILLS. 5

lating far and wide away, till the highest, even on clear
days, seemed to touch the sky, and, in cloudy weather,
were verily a part of heaven." And Mr. Baillie Nicol
Jar vie thus sums up the catalogue of items that con-
stitute Highland scenery : — " These Hielands of ours,
as we ca' them, gentlemen, are but a wild kind of
warld by themsells, full of heights and howes, woods,
caverns, lochs, rivers, and mountains, that it wad tire
the very deevil's wings to flee to the tap o' them." So
we may come to the conclusion that "the Hieland
hills," if not mountains, are very good representations
of them; and that we may better understand the
2170 feet that go to make-up the altitude of Beinn-
an-Tuirc {Beinn or Ben, as we may remember, denotes
a hill of the largest scale) we may call to mind the
heights of the two greatest hills that a Londoner would
first meet with on his travels northward ; viz. the Mal-
vern hills (Worcestershire Beacon) 1444 feet ; and the
Wrekin, 1320 feet. It was these « Hieland hills" that
enabled the Scotchman to vanquish the Englishman
with whom he was disputing as to the superiority of
his native country in every respect over England.
" But you must at any rate allow," said the English-
man, "that Scotland is smaller in extent than Eng-
land." " By no means," was the reply ; yours is a flat
country, ours is a hilly one ; and, if all our hills were

B 3



6 GLENCREGGAN.

rolled out flat, we should beat you by hundreds of
square miles."

As Beinn-an-Tuirc is the monarch of mountains in
Cantire, he demands of us a due recognition and special
notice ; so, while I am busied with my paint-brush in
endeavouring to represent him as he appears to us from
this Glencreggan moor, let me tell you what I know
concerning him. The local poet, from whom I have
just now quoted, has crowned him with mortal verse,
in stanzas commencing thus : —

" Delightful task 'tis to ascend
Cantire' s Mil with a true friend ;
A page of nature's book to spy,
When calm and cloudless is the sky.
A great expanse of sea and land
Stretches sublime from where we stand ;
The ocean wide, a mighty sheet,
Spreads out the concave vault to meet."

The mountain is upon the estate of Torrisdale, in
the parish of Saddell, whose minister, the Eev. John
Macfarlane, thus describes the view from its summit.
" From no point of the same altitude in the country is
the view more grand, extensive, or picturesque. In
the foreground (to the east) is the island of Arran ; to
the south, the Frith of Clyde, the Craig of Ailsa, and
the Irish Channel. From the Point of Corsil, in Wig-
tonshire, the eye can range along the intervening coun-
ties, until arrested by * the lofty Ben Lomond.' Hence



LEGEND OF THE WILD BOAR. 7

the transition is easy to Ben Cruachan and Ben More,
in Mull. To the north-west is the iTorizon line of the
Atlantic, presenting portions of its blue surface through
the openings of the different islands with which it is
indented, from Mull to the Griant's Causeway. In this
range are embraced portions of seven Scottish and two
Irish counties, and the circuit is supposed to be little
less than 300 miles."

The name Beinn-an-tuirc signifies "The Mountain
of the Wild Boar," and the Cantire Highlanders tell
the following legend in explanation of the name.* Once
upon a time, when this mountain was partly clothed
with great forests, there lived among them a wild boar
of enormous size and strength. He ravaged the country,
wandering about for prey, and killing every man and
beast that he met. For miles off he could be heard
whetting his terrible tusks against the stately oaks, and
people were afraid to pass that way, and had to drive
their cattle to other pastures. The great hero Fingal
came to Cantire, and was told of the wild boar's ra-
vages. Among his brave men there was a mighty
hunter named Diarmidf, of whom Fingal was jealous



* There is no account of tliis, or of any history attaching to the
mountain, given in the " Statistical Accounts of Scotland," or other
books in which Cantire is mentioned.

t Keefie of Gigha carried off Diarmid's wife, and was slain by him.
See chap. xiy.

B 4



8 GLENCEEGGAN.

and wished to be rid ; so to him was committed the
dangerous task to slay the boar. Diarmid accepted
the task with joy, and set out for the mountain. He
entered the oak forest that then grew at its base, and
soon got upon the track of the boar. He followed it
through the brushwood and the thick hazels that gave
to Caledonia its name *. and presently heard the boar
crunching the bones of a bullock. Diarmid sprang
upon him with his spear f, but it broke off short in
the wild boar's chest, and the beast, maddened "svith
pain and savage anger, rushed upon him. Diarmid
stept lightly aside, and the boar, in his blind fury,
dashed his tusk against the hard trunk of an oak.
Diarmid was instantly upon him with his sword, and
plunged it in his bristly body up to the very hilt, and
the boar rolled over and died. Diarmid blew his horn
and obtained help, and they dragged the dead body of
the boar to the tent of Fingal, where there was great



* This, however, is a doubtfiJ etymology ; for though Caledonia is
said by some to mean " the land of hazels," which grow there in such
luxuriance, yet others would deriye the word from Na CaoUlaoin, " the
men of the woods ; " and the Deiicaledones has the like signification.
Tacitus is the earliest author who uses the word Caledonii.

t The readers of " Ossian's Poems " may call to mind the strife of
the two kings, Culgorm and Sucandrolo, who jointly killed a boar, and
then, like modern shooters with a bird, each laid claim to the honour
of the deed. They quarrelled oyer it, and ended the dispute by a



DIAEMID A YICTOR. 9

rejoicing at the deed, and many shells * were quaffed
in honour of Diarmid.

But there were many among the followers of Fingal
who envied Diarmid his victory over the dreaded wild
boar, and the great Fingal himself was enraged to see
him return alive and successful ; so, while some were
preparing the pit with smooth stones, in which to roast
the boar, others were speaking aside against Diarmid,
and Fingal was revolving in his mind how he might
best rid himself of the man who had so aroused his
jealousy at his brave deeds. Then came there one to
Fingal and said, " It is not wonderful that Diarmid
hath slain the boar, for the boar had no power to hurt
Diarmid." Then Fingal demanded how that might be ;
and was answered : " Diarmid hath a charmed body ;
no sword or spear of man, nor yet the tusk or horn of
beast can wound him, save but in one little spot."
" Tell me that spot," said Fingal, " that I may wound
him there ! where is it?" "Upon his heel," was the
reply.

Now the dead body of the wild boar was lying near,
and Fingal and his followers went to view it, and to
express their wonder at its huge size and gi-eat length.

* In olden times the Highlanders drank from shells, a practice,
indeed, which is not quite extinct in the present day. Thus it is in
" Ossian's Poems " that a banquet-hall is called " the hall of shells,"
and the host, "the chief of shells ;" vrhile the wine-drinking is poeti-


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