Cuyler Reynolds.

Hudson-Mohawk genealogical and family memoirs; online

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HUDSON- MOHAWK
GENEALOGICAL



AND



Family memoirs



A RECORD OF ACHIEVEMENTS OF THE PEOPLE OF THE HUDSON AND
MOHAWK VALLEYS IN NEW YORK STATE, INCLUDED WITHIN THE PRES-
ENT COUNTIES OF ALBANY, RENSSELAER. WASHINGTON. SARATOGA,
MONTGOMERY, FULTON, SCHENECTADY, COLUMBIA AND GREENE.



PREPARED UNDER THE EDITORIAL SUPERVISION OF

CUYLER REYNOLDS

Curator of The .Albany Institute and Historical and -Art Society, since 1S98; Director of New-
York State History Exhibit at Jamestown Exposition, igo7; .Autlior of ".Albany
Chronicles," "Classified Quotations," and several other published works.



VOLUME IV.



LLUSTRATED



NEW YORK

LEWIS HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY






COPYRIGHT

LEWIS HISTORICAL PUBLISHING COMPANY

1911



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HUDSON AND MOHAWK VALLEYS.



The family name of Dix is of the

DIX same significance as the name Dicks
or Dickens, the letter "s" being a
contraction of "son," meaning the son of Dick
or of Richard. Dick, the familiar abbrevia-
tion of Richard, is thought to be derived from
the Dutch word "Dyck" or "Dijck," a bank
or dike (also dyke), mound or ditch, of earth,
sand or stones reinforced, thrown up to pre-
vent low land in Holland from being inun-
dated by the sea or river. The reason for
including the meaning "ditch" in connection
with "mound" is because in the act of cre-
ating a barrier, or diking, a ditch is created
at the selfsame time ; but the intention being
to create a wall of earth, chief thought is
therefore directed to that meaning of the
word. Based accordingly on this idea of the
significance of the name's derivation, the con-
clusion cannot be otherwise that this family,
"before coming over to America, dwelt near a
■dyke in Holland, in the lowlands as they are
called, undoubtedly along the coast.

The name is therefore found in the spellings
Di.K. Dikx, Diks, Dicks, Dyck, Dyk, Dijck
and Dyke, and some families in America
show that they came originally from such a
locality in Holland by employing the prefix
"van" or "von," as Van Dyke.

The Dix coat-of-arms, of the Amsterdam
"branch, was as follows: D'azur a trotis tetes
et cols de cygne d'argent, accompagne de
debx roses d'or en fiancs. That of the Har-
lem line was as follows : D'or a la fasce
d'azur, accompagne de trois corneilles de
sable, souvent ecarteie de gules au chevron,
accompagne en chef de deux etoiles et en
pointe d'un croissant tourne, le tout d'or.
Crest: Une corneille de sable entre un vol
■d'or et d'azur.

Four distinct branches of the Dix family
were started in .America in early times. These



Watertown, Massachusetts, and the Dix fam-
ily of Accomac county in Virginia. It is not
known that anybody has been able to demon-
strate the relationship reliably. Undoubtedly
they were connected by the generation just
previous to any one of them coming to
America.

Edward Dix and his wife, Deborah, canie
from England and settled at Watertown,
Massachusetts. They were in the fleet with
Governor Winthrop, in 1630. He appears
to have died at that place, prior to the re-
moval of his immediate family into Connecti-
cut, leaving a widow and three children. The
widow, Deborah, married (second) October
16, 1667, Richard Barnes, of Marlboro,
Massachusetts, by whom she had five chil-
dren, between 1669 and 1683, according to
certain published records ; but the dates seem
somewhat averse to the fact. Children: i.
Leonard, see forward. 2. John, who was in
Hartford, Connecticut, in 1676; was taxed
there in 1683 : sold his house and land in
1686: owned land in Hoccanum, near the
mouth of the river bearing that name, in
1679; joined the Second Church of Hart-
ford, September 10, 1686: married Mary Bid-
well ; children : Sarah, John, Margaret, Dan-
iel, Elizabeth, Susanna and Joseph. 3. Wil-
liam, died in Hartford, Connecticut, in 1676.

(H) Leonard, son of Edward and Deborah
Dix, was known to be in Wethersfield, Con-
necticut, after which he was in Branford,
Connecticut, where he receive



Online LibraryCuyler ReynoldsHudson-Mohawk genealogical and family memoirs; → online text (page 1 of 104)