David Cory.

Puss Junior and Robinson Crusoe online

. (page 1 of 6)
Online LibraryDavid CoryPuss Junior and Robinson Crusoe → online text (page 1 of 6)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Produced by Suzanne Shell, Emmy and the Online Distributed
Proofreading Team at http://www.pgdp.net











[Illustration: ROBINSON CRUSOE THOUGHT HE SAW CANNIBALS IN THE DISTANCE.

_Puss-in-Boots Jr. and Robinson Crusoe._ _Frontispiece._]




PUSS JUNIOR AND ROBINSON CRUSOE

BY DAVID CORY

AUTHOR OF
LITTLE JACK RABBIT BOOKS,
LITTLE JOURNEYS TO HAPPYLAND,
PUSS IN BOOTS BOOKS, Etc.

[Illustration]



PROFUSELY ILLUSTRATED

GROSSET & DUNLAP
PUBLISHERS NEW YORK
Made in the United States of America




PUSS JUNIOR
AND ROBINSON CRUSOE

Copyright, 1922
By Harper & Brothers
Printed in the U.S.A.




CONTENTS


PAGE

JACK SPRAT 1
THE YELLOW HEN 5
DICKORY DARE PIG 8
THROUGH THE FOREST 11
A TURTLE AND A FISH 14
PUSS FINDS A SUPPER 17
ARKVILLE 21
HOTEL ARK 24
ALL ABOARD 26
PRECIOUS MOTHER GOOSE 30
CAPTAIN NOAH 33
FORTY DAYS AND FORTY NIGHTS 36
UP AND DOWN 39
ROCK-A-BY 43
THE ROCK-A-BY BABY 46
SAILORS TWO 50
A WONDERFUL SHIP 53
ALL ABOARD 56
OLD TOM 59
A NEW PASSENGER 62
OVER THE WATER 65
CUSTARD AND MUSTARD 68
ROWLEY FROG 71
MRS. MOUSEY 75
A SAD ENDING 78
BEAVER DAM 81
DUCKLINGS 86
A LESSON IN WADDLING 89
HOW TO BE A DUCK 92
WHEN I WAS A LITTLE BOY 95
GOOD RIDDANCE 97
MR. FOX 100
MR. SLIPPER-SLOPPER 103
A DINNER INVITATION 106
ROAST DUCK 108
TAFFY 111
A KIND VISIT 113
THE RED BEARD 116
ROBINSON CRUSOE 119
CRUSOE CASTLE 122
FRIDAY 125
SUPPOSING 128
THREE MEN IN A TUB 131
A BIG FISH 134
MARY LEE 137
STORY-TELLING 140




PUSS JUNIOR AND ROBINSON CRUSOE




JACK SPRAT


ONE day as little Puss, Junior, was traveling through New Mother Goose
country, he came to a funny little house all covered with rose vines,
even up to the top of the small red chimney they grew in crimson
splendor. And as Puss stopped to look at the pretty sight, a tiny blue
bird in a cage on the front porch began to sing:

"Jack Sprat had a pig,
Who was not very big;
He was not very lean
He was not very fat;
'He'll do for a grunt,'
Says little Jack Sprat."

"Oh, ho," thought Puss, and he turned into the yard and walked around to
the little red barn. There stood Jack Sprat himself, leaning against the
sty, watching his pig eat his dinner.

Well, just then, all of a sudden, a swarm of golden bees came humming
into the little farmyard, and before long they had made a home in the
empty beehive that stood close by.

[Illustration]

"You have brought me luck," said little Jack Sprat, turning to Puss.
"Now I shall have honey, and with bees and a pig I shall grow rich and
supply all Mother Goose Country with good things to eat." And would you
believe it, the pig began to grow fat, and the bees to buzz out of the
hive and wing their way over to the roses for sweets with which to make
their honey.

Then Jack Sprat asked Puss to come into his little house, and when he
went to the cupboard to look for bread and butter, he found all kinds of
good things to eat.

"What luck you have brought me," said little Jack Sprat, but Puss was as
much surprised as he. But pretty soon when they had sat down to the
table, they heard a strange little voice from the hearth, and looking
down they saw a tiny black cricket, who began to sing:

"I'm just a little cricket,
But if you'll let me stay
Within your house this winter
You will not rue the day."

"It is the little cricket that brings you luck," said truthful little
Puss, Junior. And then Jack Sprat began to laugh happily, for up to this
time the pig was the only thing he owned, and that wasn't very much, let
me tell you. Oh, dear, no. Not in these hard times when eggs are worth
their weight in gold and a gallon of milk costs a ton of silver.

Well, by and by, Puss, Junior, once more went on his way, and perhaps
pretty soon he'll find his father, the famous Puss in Boots, unless,

A great big husky giant
Jumps into a trolley car,
And turns the coin box upside down
To see how many nickels there are.




THE YELLOW HEN


WELL, a big husky giant didn't jump into the trolley car, as I feared he
might in the last story, so little Puss, Junior, kept up his search for
his dear father until late in the evening when he came to a city on
Goosey Gander River. For the moment I've forgotten the name, but if I
remember it I will tell you later. At any rate, it won't matter much,
for Puss didn't stay there long. Well, as I was saying, he entered the
city, tired and hungry, for he had traveled far that day, and as he
walked up the brightly lighted street he heard a man say:

"Saw ye aught of my love a-coming from the Opera?
Around her throat a string of pearls,
And on her neck two little curls;
Saw ye aught of my love a-coming from the Opera?

"My good man, I'm a stranger and have just arrived. I have seen no
string of pearls nor little curls on any pretty little girls," answered
Puss wearily, for he was too anxious to find a night's lodging to notice
pearls and curls.

"Dear me!" sighed the man, and he took off his opera hat and flattened
it and then snapped it out again, which made a little newsboy open his
eyes and say, "Do it again, Mister; it sounds like a pistol." But the
man wouldn't, so the little newsboy ran off and Puss turned away, for he
had no time to be talking to operagoers at that time of evening. By and
by he came to a narrow street at the end of which shone a little light.
So he turned down and presently found himself in front of a little
house. In the hammock on the front porch sat a pretty yellow hen,
swinging back and forth, and every now and then singing to herself:

"It's after ten! It's after ten!
Time for bed for Yellow Hen."

"Good evening!" said Puss, taking off his plumed hat and bowing
politely. "May I ask for a night's lodging. I'm tired and footsore, and
have traveled many miles in New Mother Goose Country."

The little Yellow Hen flapped her wings and fluttered down to the
piazza. "Come," she said, stretching out her right wing. "Travelers are
always welcome. We hear little down at the end of this narrow street.
Tell me some news, my good Sir Cat."

"Are you sure you are not too sleepy?" asked Puss. "It was only a few
minutes ago you were singing 'It's after ten, it's after ten; time for
bed for Yellow Hen!'" But the little hen only laughed and said, "I must
wait up for Mr. Rooster."

"He's the Cock at early dawn
Who blows on the Mayor's auto horn
To wake the city and stir the men
To be up and at their work again."

Just then a gaily feathered rooster walked up the steps, but what he
said I shall have to tell you in the next story, for it's so late now
that I must say good-night.




DICKORY DARE PIG


YOU remember, I hope, where I left off in the last story - just as the
rooster came up the steps of the little house at the end of the narrow
street where Puss, Junior, was making a call on the little Yellow Hen.
Well, he was very much surprised to see our small traveler, but
nevertheless he was most polite. He stretched forth his right wing to
shake hands when, all of a sudden,

Dickory, dickory, dare,
The pig flew up the stair,
A very funny thing to do,
And made the rooster doodle-doo.

"Gracious me! Oh me, Oh my!" screamed the little Yellow Hen. "That awful
pig will just spoil my stair carpet." This made the rooster all the more
angry at the Dickory Dare Pig, as he called him, and he strutted across
the piazza. "I'll spur him when he comes down," he said, and he waited
at the front door. But Mr. Pig took no chances. He staid upstairs until
the little Yellow Hen began to cry. "I want to go to bed." Puss, by this
time, was also very sleepy, and the gaily feathered rooster - well, I
think he was half asleep, as he stood by the front door, with his head
tucked under his wing.

"He'll forget to crow in the early morn;
And little Boy Blue with his silver horn
Is always asleep, so what shall I do
If my Rooster sleeps the whole night through?"

[Illustration]

"It's time for me to do something," exclaimed Puss, Junior, whipping out
his sword and running upstairs two at a time. But, would you believe it
if I told you, he couldn't find the Dickory Dare Pig anywhere? Puss
looked in every room and in every closet. He even lifted the cover of
the big clothes hamper that stood in the bathroom, but Mr. Pig was not
to be found.

Well, after a while, Puss looked out of the window. There on the roof of
the porch was the Dickory Dare Pig. "What are you doing?" asked Puss,
and he waved his sword threateningly. But the Pig only grunted.

"You people downstairs are making an awful fuss," and he closed his eyes
again, he was so sleepy. And, anyway, he had a very nice soft place, for
he had spread a big woolen comforter on the roof for a bed.

"Well, you get out of here," said Puss. "You have no right to take the
Yellow Hen's nice comforter, nor have you any right to sleep on the
roof, and if you don't go I'll stick my sword in you." Well, after that,
the Pig ran downstairs and out of the front door, and maybe he's running
yet, if a butcher hasn't caught him and made him into little sausages.




THROUGH THE FOREST


YOU remember when we left off in the last story, Puss had just made the
Dickory Dare Pig get off the roof of the Yellow Hen's front piazza,
after which the gaily feathered rooster and the Yellow Hen and Puss,
Junior, went to sleep, which they couldn't do before on account of that
dreadful pig snoring. Well, he never came back, for he was so afraid of
Puss, Junior's, sword, that he kept on running until he lost his shadow,
spent a year and a day hunting for it, and after that he sat down and
rested.

The next morning bright and early, just as the sun was waking up in the
East, the gaily feathered Rooster began to blow his silver horn to wake
the people before the morn, and some got cross when they heard his song,
but others hurried their dressing along, and pretty soon Puss was
dressed and the little Yellow Hen combed her feathers and came down to
breakfast. And while they were at the table, the Rooster came in and
said:

"There was an old woman, as I've heard tell,
Who went to market her eggs to sell.
As she went to market her eggs to sell
On the asphalt pavement she slipped and fell.

Then came a policeman whose name was Stout,
When he saw all the eggs lying strewn about,
He said, 'What is this, a river of eggs
Too bad, my old woman, you slipped on your legs!'

Then he helped the little old woman to stand,
And placing a new dollar bill in her hand,
He said, 'My old woman, don't scramble your eggs
On the pavement again by losing your legs.'"

"I'll never let her take my eggs to market," said the Yellow Hen, and
the Rooster flapped his wings and crowed, he was so glad. And after that
Puss, Junior, said good-by and went upon his journey, and by and by he
came to a forest. Now this forest was full of bold robbers, but Puss
didn't know that, so he walked in and by and by he came to a little hut.
From the chimney a thin gray feather of smoke slowly made its way up
through the tall tree tops, and around the front door climbed a wild
vine. Puss went up boldly and knocked and when the door opened he saw a
fox. At first he was somewhat frightened, but the fox said, "Come in,
Sir Cat," so our little traveler entered and sat down.

Then the fox asked him where he was going. "To see my dear father, the
famous Puss in Boots," replied little Puss, Junior. "It's not very far
from here," answered the fox, "but the way is dangerous. Many robbers
lie in wait for the unwary traveler."

"I have my trusty sword," cried Puss, "I'm not afraid."

"Well, since you are so brave, I will help you," said the fox; "I know a
way and will show you how you may escape the robbers."




A TURTLE AND A FISH


AS I told you in the last story, the Fox promised to help Puss and
pretty soon he led him out of the little log house and through a thick
undergrowth of young timber until they came to a river. "Now, the
robbers will never think for a moment that you would travel by water,"
said the Fox with a grin. "Here is a little boat," and he pushed aside
the bushes behind which lay a rowboat with a pair of oars.

As Puss got in, the Fox gave him some parting directions. "Follow the
stream until you come to a lake. Then leave your boat and follow the
right bank until you come to a bridge. After that you will find the
highway which will take you to the castle of my Lord of Carabas, where
your famous father, Puss in Boots, lives."

"Thank you, my good friend," cried our little hero, pushing off from the
shore, and in a few minutes he was gliding down the stream.

"Heigh-ho!" he sighed. "This is a new way to travel, but I have had
many experiences, so why not a rowboat instead of a gander or an
automobile," and he bent to his rowing and by and by he came to a bend
in the river, and as it was late in the afternoon, he decided to land
and camp for the night. But no sooner had he landed on the bank than a
large turtle came up to him and said:

"This is Turtle Island. No one is allowed to land unless he has a
permit." Of course, little Puss, Junior, didn't have one, but after a
moment's reflection, he said:

"I am about to visit my father, the famous Puss in Boots, and if I
cannot remain here for the night, I may have an accident on the river.
Please let me stay."

"Very well," said the Turtle, scratching his head, "you may remain on my
island," and then he crawled away to his own house on the hill, which
Puss could see in the distance. I think the Turtle was a disagreeable
sort of person not to have asked our little traveler to spend the night
with him, but then, you know, there are some disagreeable people even in
New Mother Goose Country, and the Turtle was one of them.

The next morning, bright and early, Puss, Junior, got up and cooked his
breakfast, and then he jumped into his rowboat and started off and by
and by, as he was gliding along, a big fish came up to the surface and
said, "Helloa, there!" At first Puss was startled, for he didn't see the
fish, but as soon as he did, he replied:

"Don't get in my way! I might push my oar in your eye." This made the
fish laugh so hard that he cried, and after that he laughed some more,
only he didn't cry that time. "Where are you going?" he asked.

"To the castle of my Lord of Carabas," replied Puss.

"A long journey, my brave little cat," said the fish, "but keep up a
brave heart. You are already more than half way across New Mother Goose
Country."




PUSS FINDS A SUPPER


FOR many days Puss, Junior, traveled in his boat down the river and
towards evening he heard a voice on the shore singing:

"Rock-a-by baby, thy cradle is green,
Dad's a policeman, the finest yet seen;
And mother's a lady and goes to a ball,
And Johnny's a member of Tammany Hall."

Of course this made our little traveler laugh, for he didn't know there
was a Tammany Hall in New Mother Goose Country and neither did I until
Puss told me.

Well, he pulled his boat up on the bank and got out, and after that he
listened again for the song, but there wasn't a sound, so he thought the
baby must be asleep. Then he tiptoed over to a little cottage nearby and
looked in the window. There sat a pretty little woman with a baby in her
arms. And when she saw Puss she lifted her finger very gently to let him
know that her baby was in the Land of Nod, and after that she placed him
gently in the cradle.

"Come in," she whispered to our little pussy cat traveler and when they
were in the nice bright kitchen, for the fire in the stove made bright
streaks of light over the clean floor, she said:

[Illustration]

"Sir Cat, you are a traveler, I see. Tell me one of your adventures
while I get the supper. My good man will soon be home, hungry and tired
from his day's work."

Now Puss, Junior, was tired, too, and he didn't feel a bit like sitting
down and telling a story. But he was an obliging little pussy and he
knew, like Little Tommy Tucker, he must pay for his supper.

"Once upon a time," he began, "there was a famous cat, and the reason he
was so famous was because he had done a great favor for his master. You
see, his master was the youngest of three sons, who, when his father
died, got nothing but the cat, while the others got the farm and the
money. But he never complained, which so pleased the cat that he made up
his mind to help his young master. And what do you think he did? One day
his master's clothes were stolen while in bathing, and the king, who was
passing by at that moment in his coach, felt so sorry that he gave the
young man a beautiful suit and asked him to drive with him. Of course
the cat went, too, and as they passed along he waved his paw and said,
'All these lands belong to my master.' By and by they came to a castle
where lived a giant. So the cat ran ahead, and said to the giant, who
was sitting in his big room; 'I hear you can change yourself into
anything. Let me see if you can turn into a mouse!' 'That's easy!'
laughed the foolish giant. Whereupon this wise cat ate him up. And when
the king arrived, he said, 'Here is my master's castle;' which so
pleased the king that he gave his daughter to wed and the young man
never forgot how his cat helped him to fame and fortune. And this cat is
my father," concluded little Puss, Junior, with a bow.




ARKVILLE


THE next morning when Puss, Junior, went down to the river, he found his
boat was gone.

[Illustration]

"Now I must trust again to my red-topped boots," he sighed, and at once
set off to find his dear father. By and by he saw a little man in the
distance, who, on coming nearer, turned out to be Tom Thumb.

Puss picked him up and placing him on his shoulder, set off once more.
But, goodness me! It soon began to rain, and Tom Thumb crept into a
pocket to keep dry.

Towards the middle of the day they arrived on the outskirts of a small
village. In the distance they could hear the strokes of a hammer, and
then, now and again, the whirr of a saw cutting into hard wood.

"What's going on, I wonder?" said Tom Thumb; "sounds as if they were
building a house."

"Don't know," answered Puss, "but let's hurry, for I am soaked to the
skin."

On arriving in the village they saw what appeared to be an immense boat
in the early stages of construction. It was being erected in the city
square, the little park that stood in the midst of the stores and
houses.

Drawing nearer they heard a voice singing:

"Noah of old did build an Ark
Of spicy gopherwood and bark
To float upon the deluge dark.
Now on this Ark they had no sail,
For it was made (and true the tale)
Without a mast to break the gale."

When Puss and Tom halted at the side of the Ark a kind-looking man
stopped his hammering and said:

"It's going to rain for forty days and forty nights. There's going to be
an awful deluge. You'd better stay in Arkville and get aboard the Ark as
soon as it's finished. If you don't you'll get drowned."

"He speaks the truth, I'm thinking," answered Tom Thumb, peeping out of
Puss, Junior's, pocket. "It looks to me as if the rain were never going
to stop."

"My good sir," said Puss, turning to the man, "it seems to me your
advice is good. We'll stay in Arkville for a few days. But where shall
we stop? Is there a hotel near?"

"Over yonder is the Hotel Ark," said the man. "I'm the proprietor, and
my name is Noah. Go in and make yourselves at home. My sons and I will
follow you shortly. We have a few more nails to drive before we quit for
the day."




HOTEL ARK


THE Hotel Ark was a comfortable sort of a place, not very up-to-date,
but with enough conveniences to make the traveler perfectly at home. He
felt even more so after meeting the proprietor's wife, Mrs. Noah, a
motherly-looking woman, with kind blue eyes and red cheeks.

"Come right in," she said as Puss, Junior, and Tom Thumb, both wet to
the skin, rapped on the door.

"You'd best dry yourselves in the kitchen," she said, leading them down
a narrow hall. "It's so warm in there you'll be dry in no time."

This was good news to our two small travelers, for their teeth were
chattering like twenty-four small white horses on a red hill.

"Here's a chair for you and here's a chair for Tom Thumb," said Mrs.
Noah. "I'm not sure about your name, but I can't mistake that of your
little friend." Puss, Junior, turned and bowed. Although he was wet, he
did not forget his manners. "My name is Puss in Boots, Junior."

"To be sure, to be sure," cried Mrs. Noah, "I might have known it."

The kitchen fire was burning merrily, bright flames shot up the chimney
and sparks from the wood flew out like stars upon the polished floor.
Puss pulled off his dripping hat and laid it down on the chair. The
feather was much bedraggled and had lost its wave. Tom Thumb undid his
coat and hung it up, and then took off his shoes and placed them close
to the hearth.

"I think my boots are half full of water," said Puss, Junior; "they are
as heavy as lead, and when I walk they make a funny noise." They
certainly were full of water, for when Puss finally got them off and
turned them over, a stream of water ran down the floor, nearly washing
Tom Thumb across the room.

By the time their clothes were dry, Noah and his three sons arrived for
supper.

"Still raining!" said the good man, as he closed the door. "I must
finish the Ark to-morrow. We may find a lake around the hotel by the
morning. Who can tell? But I shall be ready to take in all the animals
and my family by noon at the latest."




ALL ABOARD


[Illustration]

IT was still raining when Puss, Junior, and Tom Thumb awoke. They had
spent a comfortable night at the Hotel Ark and felt much refreshed.
After a hearty breakfast they again looked out of the window. The rain
was still coming down in torrents, and water lay inches deep upon the
street. The Hotel Ark was surrounded by a shallow lake which, however,
was growing deeper every minute.

Puss, Junior, stepped out upon the veranda and looked over the village
square. Through the rain he could make out the outlines of the Ark. Just
then a voice began to sing:

"He built it high, he built it strong,
He built it wide, he built it long,
To hold a jolly, motley throng."

Pretty soon Noah himself came splashing through the water toward the
hotel.

"There is no time to lose," he cried, "the Ark will soon be afloat.
Mother, make haste. Tell the girls to come along. We've no time to
lose." Mrs. Noah appeared almost immediately, followed by the wives of
her three sons. Lifting up their skirts, they waded after Noah. Puss,


1 3 4 5 6

Online LibraryDavid CoryPuss Junior and Robinson Crusoe → online text (page 1 of 6)