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CORNUCOPIA




1975



Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

Lyrasis JVIembers and Sloan Foundation



http://www.archive.org/details/cornucopia1975dela



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1975
CORNUCOPIA

DEL A WARE VALLEY COLLEGE

OF SCIENCE AND A GRICUL TURE

DO YLESTO WN, PENNS YL VA NIA





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THE GINKGO!



For several reasons, the ginkgo tree has become symbolic of
the Delaware Valley College campus. Because of its morpho-
logical significance and its value as a living fossil, it is a subject
of college biology and botany studies. Theesthetically pleasing
fan shaped leaves with their bright yellow autumn color com-
bined with the tree's stately appearance, give reason for admir-
ation of it's unique beauty. And lastly, the ginkgo berries on
the trees that line "Ginkgo Lane" are the target of many crazy
jokes and pranks among the students.












ESSENTIA LS FOR GROWTH



Just as the ginko berry, with the potential to become a mature
tree, we, as freshmen entering DVC, had the potential to
mature and become assets to society. But we needed an edu-
cation to help us to develop and grow in knowledge as does
the ginko berry require fertile ground to develop.






?■









RECEPTIVE. .



Embarking upon our education, we begin to
open and expand our minds to new ideas and
trends, just as the ginkgo berry germinates after
the outer covering splits to make room for new
growth.







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'Wbv,



As the ginkgo seedling develops and matures into
a tree, we too develop during our four years here,
inheriting a deeper understanding, a greater
awareness of life, and a realization of how we can
live it most successfully and happily.



RESPONSIVE




MA TURITY



After graduation we go out into the world and
contribute what we have learned and experienced
just as the mature ginkgo sheds its berries from
which grow more of the uniquely beautiful ginkgo
trees.








CONTINUATION.








•*^c:;^:^'-



D
E
D
I
C
A
T
I
O
N




MR. RONALD C. DEERING. B.S.. M.S.
Associate Professor of Biolog>




Class oj 1975

l)flii\Miri' Wilier College

Dear hriends:

To work in close association with youth is one of the great joys in life for anyone interested in the creative
efforts oj man. The inspirations of the young are the flames, their aspirations the forces which shape primordial
stuff oj all kinds into unique cunjiguralions on the anvil of life. This capability of the young is the essence of life
for the adventurous and questing.

It has been my good fortune to work within circles of youth all of my life, competing with it in earlier years
in art and then scientific research, and finally wrestling with it in eyeball to eyeball teaching with no holds barred.
Surges of Joy arise within me when I recall successes shared with youth, some with several of your class, which
mark real accomplishments, small perhaps in the general sense, but of vital importance to those engaged in the
endeavors as persons of hope and sensitivity.

The future beckons all of us everywhere in lime and space. \'ou are to enter the larger world there to jousi or
be jousted, to shape and be shaped, to earn and give, to be hurt and to heal. You are to enter this world during
one of its many difficult periods. No person can advise you truly. Today's revolutions are too numerous and
unfathomable for any to speak from a position of cocooned security, f^'e are all subject to the hazards and
complexities prevalent. Your wit must be your guiding sense: your best judgement your shield. Let the latter be
tough but malleable and look Jor some laughter whatever the threatening chagrin. Men of good will have always
achieved a respected place in history whatever the difficulties of their day. Respect carries its own riches.

I. too. am changing course, not to go into shaded retirement, but to take up the pursuit oj old goals. So there
is an ending of sorts here — a double parting jor all oj us. The most singular thing which makes this parting
memorable for me is the image of the Aggie which comes to me now as it will in the future — a man of character,
resourceful in abilities — a man for all seasons. There is nothing stereotyped in the image jor each Aggie is his
own ftian. warm and likable in his own way. One wishes there were more like him in today's world.

As for the young ladies recently entered the College and now graduating with your class, these have amply
demonstrated they have a zing of their own which more than matches the Aggie zapp. Indeed one already can
foretell some oj these girls are going to become forefront counselors in tomorrow's society.

Of course I congratulate each of you on your graduation and wish you Godspeed in the future. You graduation
is a joy to many, particularly you parents. You have become the standard-bearer of all of our heritages. Parents
and teachers are homologous. I, as do your parents and other teachers, gain my reward from pride in the
soundness of your promise and the depth of your resolution. May the future be kind to you.

Sincerely.
Ronald C. Deering






-•\



1










WNISTRA TION
AND FACULTY





WillettaK.Gourley
Assistant Secretary of the Corporation




Winton Tolles
Acting President



Agnes Wilson
P. A. Assistant



Clara M. DeCoursey
Purchasing Agent




Joseph E. Fulcol\
Director of Student Counsehng Services




Joshua Feldstein

Dean

Chairman, Division of Plant Science



Elizabeth Evans
Asst. Secretary of the Corporation




f




Jean H. Work
Administrative Asst., Business Manager



Lionel M Adcisuri
Associate Dean, Chairman, Division of Science








Elmer G. Reiter, Jr.
Comptroller, Asst. Treasurer





Accounting Office



Joan Gomeringer
Secretary to Mr. McClelland And Mr. Hegyes






Doren DeJulio
Switchboard




Joan Holt
Secretary to Dr. Tolles. Dr. Feldstein and Mr. Adelson




Steno Pool








-f s





Sharon Galiiz
Secretary to Mr. Sauer




Robert Sauer
Dir. Financial Aid Adviser to 1975 Cornucopia




Emily Aulenbach
Secretary to Mr. Larsson



Boyd Ghering
Chairman Evening and Summer School



Theresa Cherry
Secretary to Mr. Ghering





Gloria Faaet
Secretary to Mr. Tasker





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Robert J. Tasker
Dean of Students





Stanley A. Sitarski
Assistant Dean of Students



Shirley Finnie
Secretary to Mr. Sitarski




Oskar H. Larsson
Registrar





H.\\illiamCrd\er
Director o\ Admissions




Phyllis Slille
Secretary to Admissions



Elaine McGeady
Secretary to Admissions




Linda Evans
Admissions Counselor




Stephen W. Zenko
Admis'-ions Counselor




Barry Snyder
Admissions Counselor




Brent Franklin
Admissions Counselor



GENERAL
STUDIES




Richard C. Ziemer
Associate Professor of General Studies





Dr. George Keys
Chairman, General Studies Division



I H




Sally Smith
Instructor in English



bdward I.Gavin hdwin C. Lawrence
Instructors in General Studies




Gordon Roberts
Assistant Professor of General Studies





Peter (ilick
Professor of General Studies



Edward O'Brien
Assistant Professor of General Studies





Paul Wade
Instructor in General Studies



Edward Rogers
Instructor in General Studies



SPECIAL
STUDIES





Edith M. Prundeanu
Special Instructor in German



James O'Reilly
Instructor in Art



Robert Fitt
Instructor in Music




Joann Roberts
Instructor in Music







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JESg^y.



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MA TH A ND
PHYSICS




Paul D. Trembeth
Instructor in Mathematics




James Popham
Associate Professor in Mathematics



Francis Hofstaedter
Associate Professor in Phvsics and Mathematics




Theodore Christie. Jr.
Assistant Professor in Mathematics




Michael Tabachnick
Assistant Professor in Physics




LIBRARY STAFF




C£.V7-£/? Carolyn Milheim
Head Librarian



Edna Ney
Secrelar\ to Poultry Lab.



P.D.L.



Charles Conover
Senior Baclenoloeist





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L Howard Kahan
Associate Professor of Poultry Pathology






Dr. Richard Schumacher
College Physician




INFIRMARY



Elizabeth Potts
College Nurse




Mildred Gulick
Staff Resident



PHYSICAL
EDUCATION




Dorothy Kollinger
Secretary to Mr. Silan






John Silan — Chairman of Health Services
Physical Education and Athletics




h. Robert Marshall
Instructor in Physical Education



John Hardy
Instructor in Physical Education







FOOD
SER VICE







Purcell Robinson





Johanna Keunecke
Supervisor of Housekeeping



Michael Pence
Chief of Security




Maintenance Department
FAR LEFT. Joseph Troxell. Superintendant




CAMPUS
STAFF




George Moran
Recieving and Inventory



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ACTIVITIES



Queen and her Courl. LEFT TO RIGHT: Man Corrao. Carol Schnapp. Cathy
Bushko, Robin Ash. K.ath\ Riaolizzo. Judv Kohn. Janice Kirk. Edna W hite.




Ingrid Brunncr. MariUi Rigoli//ii, ( ,ilh\ TImin.is, .lo.innc ( ullcr. Wcnda Mo
gan. Paulint Risser. OH 1st runner-up, RAP 2nil, I I Ud




1974 HOMECOMING




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Nostalgia is like a grammar lesson. You find the present tense and the past
perfect.

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JOHN SILAN—A THLETIC DIRECTOR






A MESSAGE TO THE ATHLETES ■

' OF THE GRADUATING CLASS OF 1975

Graduation once again has made its dent into the athletic program which has provided many thrills and moments
of joy for the student body of Delaware Valley College. Many lessons shall be applied today that were learned
yesterday in the field of competition, such as, the will to win, the desire to excel, the motivation to achieve, the
desire to establish new records and attain a goal, and to provide leadership which our present society needs. The
lessons learned from participation can be applied in all fields, not only that of competitive athletics.

Athletics represents a bastion of strength to confront the problems in today's society and look upon as a game
where one can rally and find cause for hope. Never in this nation's history has there been a greater need for
individual pride and the wherewithal to stand up and be counted. College athletics, strong and fair competition,
and an inner desire to be proud of one's accomplishment goes a long way in aiding development of young people
of today for the rigors of tomorrow.

The main issue in life is not the victory, but the fight — the essential thing is not to have won but to have fought
well. Remember this as you go on.

The Department extends a heartfelt thanks for the work, the tears, and the joys you have given and wishes ail
the success to each graduating athlete.

JOHNSILAN



FOOTBALL




FIRST ROW i LEFT TO RIGHT} — Sieve Corman (Student Trainer), Jude McKenna. Mike Ellis, Charles Monteleone, Bob Fullerton.
Tom Smyth (Co-Captain), Fltvd Alderfer (Co-Captain). Allan Bartlebaugh. Greg Silenok, Ted King. Frank AH (Head Manager). SECOSD
ROVy (LEFT TO RlGHTl - Jan Gaubv. John Edwards, Willie Debnam. Len Mahoney. Ben Snyder. JetT Weist. Jack Fallenstein. Bob Ni-
cholson. Bill O'Neill. Mike Rinaldi. Walt Rybas. Tom Byrnes. THIRD ROW i LEFT TO RIGHT) -l\m Boyce. Scott Melroy. Mike Hann,
Ken Brokenborough. Jon Barkman. Scott Kingsbauer. Mike Konoza. Tim Orr. Charles Comstock. Ed Peyton. Bob Mekel. FOURTH ROW
I LEFT TO RlGHTl — Ron Suber (Manaeer). Eueene Kittles. Ed Cini. John Maloney. Bill Stewart. Steve Hertig. Dan Schoonmaker. Dick
Kling. Fitzgerald Gittens. Gary Driesbach.^red Zeidler. FIFTH ROW iLEFT TO RlGHTi Dennis Werner. Dick Taccomelli. Matthew
Lipton. Joe Porawski. Pat Shive. Jim Sutton. Dennis Helmstetter. Bob Barnes. Don Stamm. Wayne Tucker (Manager). SIXTH ROW
ILEFT TO RIGHT) — E. Kenneth .\chuff (Defensive), Dan Greenland (Defensive Backfield Coach). Tom Shreiner (Head Coach), John
Hardy (Offensive Line Coach). Joel Brown (Offensive Backfield Coach). John Silan (Director of Athletics). Louis Hegyes (Director of Sports
Information).

BOTTOM RIGHT: Co-Captains Tom Smyth and Keith Alderfer with Coach
Shreiner.



DVC





Grove City


14


DVC


9


Moravian


14


DVC


13


Albright


37


DVC


50


Upsala


6


DVC





Susquehanna


14


DVC


19


Lycoming


13


DVC


7


Juniata


18


DVC

1


14


Wilkes


24




SENIORS




CAMERA SHY:
William Ward



Delaware Valley's 1974 Football team can be sum-
marized in two words, young and inexperienced.
The Aggies had as many freshmen starting as they
had seniors on the team. The teanfi's 2-6 record
could have been much more respectable had a few
untimely mistakes been eliminated.

Under the leadership of co-captains Keith Alderfer
and Tom Smyth, the team did produce many excit-
ing moments throughout the season. The Aggies
first victory was a 50-6 Homecoming win over Up-
sala. The second win was a result of a ninety-six
yard drive with less than four minutes to play
against Lycoming. The team turned in very credi-
table performances against Moravian, Susque-
hanna, Juniata, and Wilkes but fell short in each
encounter.







Defense was the team's strong suit, ranking second
in the conference. The defense was led by seniors
Tom Smyth, named the outstanding defensive
lineman; Alan Bartlebaugh, a first team All-MAC
selection; Bud Fullerton, named the outstanding
defensive back and Mark Belinsky, named the out-
standing defensive player in the Anthracite Bowl.
Other members of the defense were Greg Silenok,
Ted King, Bill O'Neill, Mike Hann, Tim Boyce,
Fitz Gittens and Scott Melroy.

All-MAC fullback, Keith Alderfer, led the Aggies
offensive attack. Keith established himself as the
all-time leading rusher for Delaware Valley carry-
ing the ball for a total of 1,869 yards throughout
his career. Keith also was named the outstanding
offensive back and received the James Work
Award. Mike Ellis, the outstanding offensive line-
man, was the mainstay in the offensive line. Other
offensive players who performed very creditably
were backs Tim Orr, John Maloney, Willie Deb-
nam, who set a single game record for yards gained
on punt returns with 106 yards against Upsala,
Jack Fallenstein, Ken Brokenborough and Scott
Kingsbauer. In addition to Mike Ellis, the other
starting offensive linemen were Mike Rinaldi, First
team All-MAC tackle, Jude McKenna, John Ed-
wards, Len Mahoney, and Jan Gauby.

1974 was a difficult season, but the future for Ag-
gie Football looks bright. Among the returning
players are thirty lettermen with sixteen of them
being starters this past season. Combined exper-
ience and the attitude established by the seniors
and things should be better in 1975.






J9 ^



CROSS COUNTR Y 1974




FIRST ROW I LEFT TO RIGHT) —Donna Foley. Manager. Carl Kegel. Ray Bryson, Chuck Moose. Tim Manning Captain. Harold
Dambly. Dr. Berthold (Head Coach). SECO.\D ROM i LEFT TO RIGHTl — Mark W ilson. Dave Stull. Paul Bernett. BaTry Hossler. Gerry-
O'Connor. Bob Gerberich. Randv Naser.



The Del Val Cross Country Team completed another excellent season winning
12 of their 14 dual meets and finishing in 6th place out of the 22 colleges entered
in the conference championship meet.

This year's team was spearheaded by two fine senior athletes Barry Hossler and
Tim Manning. Barry finished first or tied for in 10 of the meets establishing
one course record at Lebanon Valley College. Tim, who captained the team and
received the Most Valuable Harrier Award, tied for first twice and finished
second in 8 other meets. The other senior on the team was the manager Bill
Conn.

Rounding out the rest of the scores for the thinclads were: Freshman Jerry
O'Connor who although hampered by an injury was a consistent performer
throughout the season; Ray Bryson, also a Freshman, who was incapicated by
a serious injury late in the season which prevented him from competiting in the
championships which definitely detracted from the team's overall showing in
that meet: Sophomores Dave Stull and Paul Bernett the latter of which who
showed marked improvement over the season and finished third man for the
team in the MACs; also figuring in the scoring were juniors Chuck Moose and
Mark Wilson.

Coach Berthold's early season outlook for the harriers was anythmg but opto-
mistic due to the loss of five key men from the 1973 squad plus many injuries.
However, as injuries began to respond to treatment there was a corresponding
lift in team spirit and team determination with the resulting successful season.

In addition to the win — loss record, the season was also noteworthy in that
the win over Lebanon Valley was the 100th since the inception of cross country
at D.V.C. in 1960. The 12 wins recorded during 1974 also are the most ever
recorded by a Del Val cross country team in a season. 1974 also saw the first
co-ed to compete in a Del Val varsity cross country meet. Jude Hall running
on the Upsala team completed the 5 mile course in 43:27.




SENIORS



Fear is the mind-killer.

Fear is the little death that brings

total obliteration.

I will face my tear.

I will permit it to pass over me and

through me.

And when it has gone past me, 1 will

turn to see fear's path.

Where the fear has gone there will be

nothing.

Only I will remain.

! from Dune by Frank Herbert




Caplam 1 ini Manning




Barry Hossler






1









SCORES






Lebanon Valley


15


DVC


46


Wilkes


21


DVC


40


Elizabeth


20


DVC


41


Wagner


15


DVC


50


F&M


17


DVC


41


Juaniata


35


DVC


23


Widener


33


DVC


22


Upsala


15


DVC


49


Dickinson


1


DVC


34


Muhlenberg


24


DVC


34


Albright


19


DVC


37


Textile


15


DVC


40


Susquehanna


15


DVC


47


Ursinus


24


DVC


31





HOCKEY 1974




FIRST ROW ~ {LEFT TO RIGHT) Betty Foy. Audrey Mather, Helen Dunbar, Debbie Ralston (Co-captain), Patty Hilton. SECOND
ROW ^ {LEFT TO RIGHT) Sue Cromwell. Barb Mc Donald, Barb Novak, Cammy Wood, Kalhy Faherty, Dcloris Heisey, THIRD ROW
— (LEFT TO RIGHT) Mrs. Vellner, Dale Wolfrum, Cathy Cochlin, Joan Hewett, Holly Deitch (Co-captain), Laurie Sterling, Mena Hautau



Delaware Valley College inaugu rated its first women's intercolle-
giate field hockey team in the autumn of 1974. Led by co-captains
Debbie Ralston and Holly Deitch, The "aggies" recorded one win,
one tie, and two losses in a four game schedule which included:
Bucks County Community College, Montgomery County Commun-
ity College, Lehigh University, and Lafayette College.

Offensively the "aggies" were guided by freshman Dale Wolfrum
who tallied all five goals for Del Val. Sue Cromwell, Holly Deitch,
Audrey Mather, and Debbie Ralston provided excessive defensive
strength allowing the opponents an average of only two goals per
game.

The initial hockey season proved to be a stepping stone for increased
athletic competition, and the women at Delaware Valley College are
looking forward to a prosperous future in athletics.




Coach Peggy Vellner



SENIORS



■r


SCORES


1


f BCCC


1


DVC


3


MCCC


4


DVC





Lafayette


1


DVC





Lehigh


2


DVC


2





Gmn> Quelch



Cammy Wood




Laurie Sterling




sw^




BASKETBALL




lu Ron LLFT TO RIOHT Watson. D Paslucha. J Harrington. J Silan. M, W ells, J, Rodenbaugh. J. Morose. :riJ ROli LEFT TO
RIGHT John Silan.Sr.. Head Coach. J McLaughlin. R Walsh. R. Slawta. D, Whittaker. R tinhorn. F. Wolfaana. .Assistant Coach.



The highlight of the 1974-75 Dela^^are Valley Col-
lege basketball season Mas the 500th career coach-
ing victory for retiring Head Basketball Coach
John Silan against Muhlenberg on February 10,
1975. The Aggies defeated Muhlenberg by a 59-54
margin to help Coach Silan reach the coveted 500
win plateau.

During the 1974-75 campaign the Aggies recorded
a 6-16 mark. A knee injury to high scoring forward
Dennis Pastucha proved costly to Del Val. Even
though Pastucha missed five games because of his
injury, he was still the squad's leading scorer with
280 points for a 16.4 average. Pastucha was Jol-
lowed in the scoring race by senior Captain John
Silan Jr. and senior Jack Harrington. Silan totaled
246 points jor a 11.1 average while Harrington
netted 222 points for a 10.0 average.

Senior Jack Harrington of Bethlehem. Pa. led the
team in rebounding with a total of 168. He was
closely J'ollowed by sophomore John "J.J." Roden-
baugh with 159 and sophomore Dennis Pastucha
with 156.

The young team which lost only three seniors will
be searching Jbr able replacements for the scoring
and rebounding strength of Harrington. Silan. and
Mike Wells ofStroudsburg, Pa.

Individual highs for the season include Dennis Pas-
tucha' s 28 points against Eastern College and Jack
Harrington's 21 rebounds in the Philadelphia
Pharmacy contest.

Besides the Aggies thrilling victory over Muhlen-
berg, the team also scored e.xciting victories against
Philadelphia Pharmacy 74-70. Lrsinus 79-78 in
overtime. 69-66 versus Drew. 79-76 over Lrsinus in
the Doylestown Jaycee Holiday Tournament and a
76-59 trouncing oj Eastern College.

Following the season it was announced that Assis-
tant Coach Frank Woljgang will take over the
Head Coaching chores while Steve Zenko will
Kerve as the Assistant Coach.




Retiring Head Coach John Silan and .Asst. Frank W olfgang



SENIORS




GIRL'S BASKETBALL




FIRST ROH L TO R: P. Hilion. L. kalmbach, J. Kirk. S. Cromwell. B. McDonald. H. One SECOND ROM D. Heisev. C. Zoller. D.
Foley, D. Cole. H. Deitch. C. Cochlin. P. Courtney, Coach Vellner.



Led offensively by Co-captains Janice Kirk
(68 points) and Diane Cole (48 points), the
lady Aggies concluded their inaugural cam-
paign with an impressive 4 — record. Com-
plimenting a strong offensive attack of 213
points, the Aggie defense, with a great effort
from freshmen Sue Cromwell and Helen
Otte, held the opposing teams to 1 1 1 points.

With the possibility of an increased schedule,
and the continuance of daily seasonal work-
outs, the future of girKs intercollegiate bas-
ketball at DVC remains bright.



DVC


35


PRINCETON II


29


DVC


62


EPISCOP.AL


19


DVC


52


RIDER


29


DVC


64


TEMPLE-AMBLER


34




Co-captains Janice Kirk and Diane Cole with Coach Peggy \ellner.



WRESTLING




FIRST ROW L TO R J. France. S. Smith. S. Marshall. J.Walker . G. LaCava, R. Homan. T. Hunter. J. Hopps. S. Corman. SECOND ROW:
Coach Marshall. D Mover. J Zalanck. P LeVan. D. Bender. D. Cope. .M Bartlebaugh. T. King. Dave Perrv. E. Eisenhart. A. Koenig, Coach
Hardv.



Wrestlers End Dual Season 1 1



The Delaware Valley College wrestling team with their 31-14
victor)' in their final match of the season with Western Mary-
land, recorded their second highest total number of victories in
one season since the sport w as started in 1 962.

A very good statistic to show an indication of the team's
strength this year was the average points scored against DVC
as compared to the average points DVC scored against their
opponents. DVC scored an average of 30 points over its 14
opponents compared to the opponents average of 8 points.

With the loss of only two regular starters. Rick Homan (142)
and Al Bartlebaugh (Hwt). plus the addition of some fine re-
cruits, next season's outlook should be another outstanding sea-
son.

Some of the fine individual records for the season were: Steve
Smith's 9-4-1 plus third place finish in the M.AC's; Rick Ho-
man's 12-1-0; Dale Moyers 11-3-0; Doug Cope's 13-1-0 and
third place finish in the M.AC's; Eric Eisenhart's 7-4-3; Ted
King's 9-3-2; and Al Bartlebaugh's 13-1-0, second place in the
MAC'S, fifth in NCAA, and AU-American status.

Returning next year as captain will be Doug Cope who was an
AU-American in 1974 and is looking forward to having his
greatest year ev -•'■ at DVC.




Coaches Marshall and Hardv


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