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OF THE

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THE



DELTA UPSILON



DECENNIAL CATALOGUE



A (.xaia 'Tt: oB rj zrj




PUBLISHED BY THE FRATERNITY
1902






EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

MELVIN GILBERT DODGE



Ann Arbor Plant
the richmond & backus co.

1903



CONTENTS



Introductory Matter — page.

Preface, ... ..;.... 5

Associate Editors, ........ 7

Roll of Chapters, ........ 8

Founders of the Fraternity, ..... 9

History of the Young Chapters —

Technology, ......... 16

Swarthmore, ......... 19

Stanford, .......... 20

California, ......... 23

McGill, 27

Nebraska, ......... 29

Toronto, . . . . . . . . . -31

Chicago, ......... 32

Convention Roll, ........ 35

Executive Council since 1884, ..... 45

Fraternity Bibliography since 1891, ..... 47

Editors of Delta Upsilon Quarterly, .... 65

Graduate Associations, ....... 67

Abbreviations, ......... 71

Educational Institutions, ....... 75

Tables of Relationship, . . . . . . ■ 77

Biographical Catalog of Each Chapter^

Williams, ...... .... 93

Union, . . . . . . , . ■ . . 161

Hamilton, . . . . . . . . . .217

Amherst, ......... 263

Adalbert, . . . . . , . . . -325

Wesleyan, . . . . . . . . ' . 349

Colby, 353

Rochester, ......... 387

Middlebury, . . . . . . . . .427

Bowdoin, ......... 457

Rutgers, . . . • 469



11119?



DELTA UPSILON DECENNIAL.

CONTENTS— Continued



Washington and Jefferson,

Brown,

Colgate,

New York, .

Miami, ....

Cornell,

Trinity, . . .

Marietta,

Syracuse,

Manhattan,

Michigan,

Northwestern,

Harvard,

Wisconsin, .

Lafayette,

Columbia, .

Lehigh, ....

Tufts,

De Pauw,

Pennsylvania,

Minnesota,

Technology,

Swarthmore, .

Stanford,

California,

McGill,

Nebraska,

Toronto,

Chicago,

Honorary Members, .
Residence Directory,
Alphabetical Index to Mem



BERS,



503
513
553
587
613
619
649

653
677

703
705
729

745
785
799
815
831
843
• 857
869
879
891
903
913
921
929

935
941

953

957

965

1061






^'^'VERSITY



OF



PREFACE

This edition of the general catalogue of the Delta Upsilon Frater-
nity follows in the main the plan of the Quinquennial Catalogue of
1 89 1. Its aim has been to include a faithful and comprehensive
biography of ever\' member of Delta Upsilon. In addition but
little of historical matter has been inserted. The first part includes
a short sketch of each of the chapters founded since 1891, and the
fraternity bibliography. The stress of the work has been placed
upon the biographical portion which forms the second part, other
features originally planned having been dropped in order to make
this part as complete as possible.

The arrangement of the biographical matter for each member
is the same as that followed by the '91 editor. Prizes however have
been entered with the biography proper, and have not been given in
a separate roll of honor. x\s additional matter the names of parents
and preparatory school have been included. The use of abbrevia-
tions, of which a list is given on page 71, has been much more
liberal, although the aim has been to employ only those that are
commonly used and easily recognized. The star has been used to
divide the different portions of each biography. All items referring
to fraternity matters are put in italics. Italics are also used for
titles of magazines. The following is the model which has been
followed :

NAME. ADDRESS.

Present occupation. * Chapter and fraternity
offices. * Date and place of birth ; parents ; prepara-
tor\- school. '■' College offices and honors : in athlet-
ics ; social life ; scholarship ; degrees in course. *
Further studies ; and occupations since graduation.
* Offices of honor and trust. * Published works. *
Contributions to inaga::incs. * Membership in learned
societies. * Honorary degrees. * Marriage. *
Relatives in tJ'.e fraternity. ^' (In case of deceased
member) date of death, and place if dififerent from
last address.
An asterisk (*) is placed before the name of each member known
to be deceased. Other signs used in the '84 and '91 catalogues to



6 DELTA UPSILON DECENNIAL.

indicate non-graduates and missing members have been omitted.
To avoid repetition the location of preparatory schools and other in-
stitutions of learning is generally omitted in the biographies. A par-
tial list of these institutions with their addresses will be found on
page 75. In the case of a missing member no address has been
given, although the last known address is indicated in the text of
the biography. For lawyers and business men living in large cities
two addresses have usually been given. In such cases the second
address is placed in the text of the biography. With lawyers this is
the residence, while with others it is more often the office address.

A plan original with the present book has been that of also pub-
lishing in separate volumes those portions of the entire Decennial
which relate to the respective chapters. There are included how-
ever with each chapter's records the geographical and name indexes
of the entire fraternity.

During the last twelve years the records show that the total mem-
bership of the fraternity has grown from 5,063 to 8,238. Eight new
chapters have been instituted and one, which died during the period
of the civil war, revived. Of these, four are located in the East,
two on the Pacific coast, one in the mid-West, and two in Canada.

Owing to circumstances which need not here be related the publi-
cation of the volume has been delayed more than a year beyond what
was first contemplated. The work was completed during the summer
of 1901, and the material then turned over to the printers. But
little matter has been added since, although advantage has been
taken of the delay in publication to insert the names of men initiated
to December of 1902. The totals given on page 8 have been cor-
rected to include these names.

The editor is under obligations and hereby returns thanks to the
many members who have encouraged by their words and interest his
work on the catalogue. He is under special obligations to the con-
tributor of the article on the Founders, and to the various chapter
editors. It has been through their efforts that most of the items
noted in the biographies have been collected. Many of these editors
being alumni have taken time from their own professional duties to
help on the work of the fraternity.



ASSOCIATE EDITORS



Williams.— Ellis J. Thomas, '88; Morton H. Eddy, '03.

Union. — Leopold Minkin, '01 ; Roy E. Argersinger, '01.

Hamilton. — William C. Schuyler, '03; Harry C. Keith, '03.

Amherst. — George M. Bartlett, '01 ; Jeremiah F. Ganey, '01 ; Wilber A.

Anderson. '02 ; Raymond W. Jones, '03.
Adelbert. — Harry A. Haring, '98.
Wesleyan. — Editor.

Colby. — Fred W. Thyng, '02 ; Martin H. Long, '02 ; Leon C. Staples, '03.
Rochester. — John S. Briggs, '90.
MiDDLEBURY. — James A. Lobban, '98; Orvis K. Collins, '02; Charles W.

Allen, '03.
Bowdoin. — Arthur F. Cowan, '01 ; George L. Lewis, '01.
Rutgers. — Louis P. Peeke, '97; Lewis R. Harris, 02; Frederick S. Bush,

'03-
Washington and Jefferson. — Editor.

Brown. — Cliflford S. Anderson, '00 ; Philip D. Sherman, '02.
Colgate. — Glenn B. Ewell, '03.
New York. — Frederick M. Crossett, '84.
Miami. — William A. Ferguson, Hamilton '04.
Cornell. — David Paine, '01.
Trinity. — Francis Conant, Amherst '00.
AL\rietta. — Samuel B. Kirby. '02: James B. Penrose, '02.
Syracuse. — Frederick H. Knoff, '02.
Manhattan. — Editor.

Michigan. — F. MacDonald Lowe, '03 ; Emerson Davis, '01.
Northwestern — Robert Catherwood, '96; Clarence E. Knowlton, '02;

Charles E. Stahl, '03.
Harvard. — Guy H. Holliday, '89.

Wisconsin. — Eugene C. Joannes, '98; Charles T. Hutson, '99.
Lafayette. — John L. Baer, '02 ; Stacy L. Roberts, '04.
Columbia. — Arthur L. Hutton, '02.

Lehigh. — James AL Daniel, Jr.. '02 ; John G. Heinz, '00.
Tufts. — Arthur B. Lamb, '00 ; William W. Austin, '02.
De Pauw.— Melville T. Cook, '94.
Pennsylvania. — John C. Hinckley, '96.

Minnesota. — Jennings C Litzenberg. '96 ; Walter P. McGuire, '04 ; Sid-
ney D. Adams, '01.
Technology. — Ralph H. Sweetser, '92 ; George T. Seabury, '02.
Swarthmore. — Thomas W. Gilkyson, '01.
Stanford. — Arthur E. Cooley, '02.

California. — William A. Alexander, '00 (Toronto '99).
McGiLL. — Robert C. Paterson, '98.
Nebraska. — Bruce W. Benedict, '01.
Toronto. — W. Harvey McNairn, '99.
Chicago. — Harold H. Nelson, '01.
Honorary Members. — Robert J. Eidlitz, Cornell '85.



ROLL OF CHAPTERS



40 CHAPTERS. 8,238 MEMBERS



CHAPTERS.



FOUNDED.



LIVING
MEMBERS.



DECEASED
MEMBERS.



TOTAL MEM-
BERSHIP.



Williams

Union

Hamilton

Amherst

Adelbert

Wesleyan

Colby

Rochester

Middlebury

Bowdoin

Rutgers

Washington and Jefferson

Brown

Colgate

New York

Miami

Cornell

Trinity

Marietta

Syracuse

Manhattan

Michigan

Northwestern

Harvard

Wisconsin

Lafayette

Columbia

Lehigh

Tufts

De Pauw ,

Pennsylvania

Minnesota

Technology

Swarthmore

Stanford

California ,

McGill

Nebraska

Toronto

Chicago

Honoraries



Total.



4 Nov. '34. .

'38

21 Jul. '47. .

29 Jul. '47..

'47

Oct. 50

'52

'52

3 Oct. '56 . .

'57

Jun. '58....
'60. ........

3 Nov. '60. .
21 Nov. '61;.
ig Dec. '65.
Mar. '68....

17 May '69.
Dec '69.. . .
23 Apr. '70.

14 Nov. '73.

'74

10 Apr. '76.

18 Feb. "So.
Dec. '80....
Spring '85..

30 May '85.
6 Jun. '85...

10 Oct. '85 .

4 Dec. '86..

2 Apr. '87. .
23 Mar. '88.
23 May *go.
Nov. '91

3 Mar. '94.
13 Mar. '96
13 Mar. '96

11 Nov. '98
9 Dec. '98.

15 Dec. '99

5 Jan. '01..



292

347
298
452
191
12
284
330
225

113
249

54
333
293
211

35
242

13
186
245

15
201

151
396
139
159
156

lOI

141
121
114
116

115
98
72
80
58
49
99
36
17



6,839



356
274
86
126
39
17
67
59
37
10

43
26
46

34
20

7
19

5

13
12

3
8

9
16

2

5



5
I

3
o
o
I
o
I
I
I
o

25



1.399



648

621

384
578

230

29
351
389

262
123
292

80

379
327
231

42
261

18
199

257
18
209
160
412
141
164
164
107
149
126

115
119

115
98

73
80

59

50

100

36
42



8,238



A^o^^.— Only the men admitted by each chapter are included in these figures, which there-
fore do not agree with those given at the beginning of each chapter's records.



FOUNDERS OF THE FRATERNITY



Sixty-seven fruitful years have passed since in a little dormitory
room at Williams College thirty serious-minded young men met to
organize a protest against college clannishness. Out of that organized
protest on November 4, 1834, has sprung a broad national fraternity,
based on principle, vigorous, enduring — the fraternity of Delta Up-
silon.

One can scarcely dare to feel that in their earnest conference over
the unhappy college politics of their own time, those pioneers cast
even one look ahead at the possible future of their undertaking. One
may decidedly question whether in their wildest visions they dreamed
for a moment that they had attended upon the birth that night of a
college brotherhood, which by the dawn of the new century should
have thirty-five branches with seven hundred undergraduate members
and 7,500 alumni. This is not to find any fault with the fraternity's
founders for lack of farsightedness. As well upbraid a Lincoln in
his cradle for not knowing that he was to be the martyred hero of a
nation, reunited by bloody war. It is rather to emphasize in these
days of our prosperity the lowly and unpretentious beginning of the
fraternity and to praise without stint the clear, strong judgment, —
the determined will that laid its firm foundation.

Fortunate, indeed, in its founders was the Williams chapter, and
thereby the Delta Upsilon fraternity. If few of them rose in their
days of labor far above the level of their fellows, all at least lived
useful, honorable lives that made the world a little better. And it
was given to one to be an early and honored leader in the journalism
of the great West, and to another to sit upon the most exalted judicial
tribunal in the world longer than any of his predecessors.



10 DELTA UPSILON DECENNIAL.

The Williams chapter was peculiarly a New England product.
It was the original chapter of the only fraternity born on the soil of
the old Bay State. Its first members, although Williamstown is on
the border of New York state, were overwhelmingly New Englanders.
Their names tell the story. Scarcely one has a name that does not
suggest honorable generations behind him, some, perhaps, nearly to
Plymouth Rock.

Of the thirty founders, twenty-one were Massachusetts born.
Five were natives of New Hampshire, one of Vermont, and one of
Connecticut. Two only came from New York state. Moreover, of
the twentv-one Massachusetts men, sixteen came from that storied
region west of the Connecticut River — a region which has had at all
times no more pressing but welcome problem than how to educate
its ambitious sons, and has sent out so many strong men to lead in
state and nation. Three of the men, Hall, Lilly, and Page,— all fresh-
men, — were natives of the little town of Hawley. Lyman and Wright
of '36 came from Easthampton, and Phillips, '36, and Williams, '38,
from rural Ashfield, whose ripened charms were in after days to make
her famous. Baldwin hailed from Tyringham. Sheffield sent Kel-
logg of '36, and Cummington, Richards, his classmate. From North-
ampton game Solomon Clark of '37, and from Chesterfield, Edward
Clarke. Lyman (not related to Lyman, '36.) came from Charlemont,
Morgan from Stockbridge, Noble from Williamstown and Sparks
from Amount Washington. These were all '37 men.

Of the members from central and eastern Massachusetts, Pise
came from Belchertown, Darling from Sterling, Brigham from ]\Iarl-
boro, Clisby from Medford and Tappan from Boston.

Among the New Hampshire men, Bell of '36 came from Antrim;
Hobart, a classmate, from Columbia ; Brown. '37, from Nelson ; Hills,
'38, from Hancock; and Peabody from Peterboro. All but one of
these towns is in the southern part of the state and farthest from the
widening influence of Dartmouth, already shining in the reflected glory
of Daniel Webster.

Vermont's only representative was Brooks, '38, from Halifax, close
to the Massachusetts border, and Connecticut's was Field. '37, from



FOUNDERS OF THE FRATERNITY. 11

Haddam, far down on the Connecticut below Hartford. New Wind-
sor, N. Y., sent Lockwood, '37, and Port Jervis, in the same state, sent
Bross, '38.

The only real city man among all this company was Tappan, who
came from Boston. For the most part, it is plain, these were plain,
country boys, the majority, in all probability, farmers' sons with all
that term meant in that generation — the early morning "chores," the
district school, the hard struggle to find means for college, the many
interruptions of the year's work to fill up the slender financial store
by teaching. They had come to college, not for amusement or a "good
time," but to make themselves fit for the sober duties of life.

It was no gathering of striplings on that November evening.
There were, indeed, extremes of age in that group, which it would be
difficult to match in college classes of these days. Ten men were
present from each of the three lowest classes. Oldest of all was Phil-
lips, a junior, who was just past 28'. Darling, also of '36, was 27 years
and 8 months and Bell, a classmate, was 26 years and 10 months.
Five others were 24 or over, two of these being freshmen. In sharp
contrast to these ages were those of Tappan, a sophomore, not yet 17;
Noble, his classmate, not 17 and a half, and Field, just. 18. It is a
remarkable, and perhaps significant, coincidence that this meeting
should have been held on the birthday of the two men of all that com-
pany whose work in the world was to receive the widest recognition.
Bross attained his majority on that day, while Field reached eighteen
years. Who knows but what the double event may have been one
occasion for the gathering and that out of the rejoicing over com-
rades' natal days came the larger birth of the fraternity ? The average
age of the men at the date of the founding was 22 years and two
months. But while the average age of the juniors was 24 years and
one month, that of the sophomores was only 20 years and seven
months, which would compare well with more modern classes. That
of the freshmen was 21 years and nine months.

Of the thirty founders, five did not graduate. Lyman and Mor-
gan ended their college careers in 1835, Lockwood left college in 1836
and was graduated at Union in 1839. Brooks and Hills left at the



12 DELTA UPSILON DECENNIAL.

same time, the former becoming a student and graduate of Wash-
ington College, Pa., and the other of Marietta. Both took their
degree in 1839. Seventeen of the founders became clergymen, a
common percentage in those days among college men. Two, Noble
and Bross, entered journalism; three, Field, Morgan, and Tappan, all
of '37, became lawyers. Hobart studied medicine and Lyman, '37,
dentistry. Three, Baldwin, Richards, and Sparks, became teachers.
Lyman, '36, studied theology a year, then taught several years and
finally became a manufacturer. Page became a merchant. Clisby
alone did not live to enter any occupation. He died during the fall
after graduation. Of the seventeen clergymen, six attended the Hart-
ford Theological School, two went to Auburn, one to Andover, two to
Princeton, one to Lane and one to the General Theological Seminary.
Lockwood divided his time between Lmion and Princeton, and three
studied theology privately.

Of the active lives of the founders there is not space nor need to
speak in great detail here. In true pioneering spirit a large number,
especially among the clergymen, went West and were important fac-
tors in the building up of new communities. Two followed Clisby
quickly to the grave — Sparks in 1838 after but a year's teaching in
Lanesboro, Mass., and Baldwin, who lingered three years in consump-
tion, teaching part of the time, and dying in Great Barrington, Mass.,
in 1839. A newspaper report of Baldwin's death speaks in warm
terms of his fine Christian character. Brown died in 1846 at Peeks-
kill, N. Y. He had studied theology privately and enjoyed one pas-
torate of seven years at West Somers, that state, when his life ended.
Brown's sister married Hobart of '36. It was nine years before the
ranks were again broken, Lilly dying in 1855 at Andover, N. Y., at
the age of 45. He studied at Auburn and spent virtually his entire
life in pastoral and missionary work in New York state. A brother
of Lilly became a member of the Williams chapter in the class of '48.
Hills passed away a year later. After his graduation at Marietta in
1839, he had studied two years at Lane and was pastor fourteen years
at Manchester and Oakford, 111.

Eleven years, including the civil war period, elapsed without a



FOUNDERS OF THE FRATERNITY. 13

single death. Noble died at Hampton, 111., in 1867. He was at the
time editor of the National Merchant of Burlington, la., after having
taught school a brief period after graduation and built railroads east
and west. Lyman, '37, had been for many years a dentist in Newark,
N. J., when he died there in 187 1. Hall died the same year in Mon-
terey, Mass. Private theological study, fifteen years in two pastor-
ates and eight as principal of Lee Academy brought him to 1864, when
he enlisted as the chaplain of a colored regiment and served to the end
of the war. Brooks was graduated at Washington and at Princeton
Theological Seminary. His thirty years of clerical labors were
divided among six states and he had hardly gone to Elgin, 111., when
he died there in 1872 at the age of 60. Darling spent only ten years
in the East, after having obtained a theological education at Gilman-
ton, N. H. In 1850 he went to Wisconsin to whose struggling and
needy churches he gave twenty-three fruitful years, dying in Fond
du Lac in 1873. Brigham taught a year, went to Andover and
preached all his life in Vermont and Bay State churches. He died
in 1874 at Winchendon, Mass. Bell studied theology at Hartford
and gave all his years to three churches in the Nutmeg state. He
died at Westchester, Ct., in June of the centennial year.

There was then another nine years' interval. Page dving in 1885
at Rah way, N. J., where he had been a merchant for forty-five years.
Phillips, who died in 1886, had spent virtually his whole life in Massa-
chusetts pastorates after taking a theological degree from Hartford.
He died in Amherst at the age of 79. Kellogg was 76 when he died
at Heuvelton, N. Y., in 1887, after a most active pastoral life in Penn-
sylvania, Massachsuetts, and New York. Lyman, '36, died two years
later at Easthampton, Mass., having been successful as a manufac-
turer of reflecting telescopes. He taught school five years, studied
at Auburn, resumed his teaching for six years, preached six or eight
years and finally entered business. Two of his brothers, Addison of
'39 and Horace of '42, were also members of the fraternity.

Bross died in 1890, full of honors. He had spent the first ten
years of active life in teaching in New York state but finally went to
Chicago and for four decades was one of the leading journalistic fig-



14 DELTA UPSILON DECENNIAL.

ures of the West. He was lieutenant-governor of the state in 1864.
In the business, educational, and scientific circles of the city he was a
living force. His love for the fraternity, which he helped to found,
was of the deepest and most enthusiastic character throughout his life.
Hobart, who died the same year, was for thirty-two years a physician
in Worcester, Mass., following a fourteen years' residence in South-
boro. He, too, was an ardent disciple of Delta Upsilon as the suc-
cessor and amplifier of the old Social Fraternity.

Clarke died in 1891 in Springfield, Mass. He is believed to have
drafted the first constitution of the fraternity. From Hartford Theo-
logical School he went to Middlefield, Mass., in which town and those
adjoining he spent most of his active life as a pastor. Pise attended
the General Theological Seminary in New York. He first was rector
in Manlius, N. Y., spent eighteen years in Tennessee, five in Indiana
and two in Maine, then going to Glendale, Ohio, where he was active
till death in 1894. Many educational and church positions were held
by him in his almost half a century of service. Morgan went direct to
Georgia from college, studied law in the intervals of editing a local
newspaper and was admitted to the bar in 1845. He was a member
of the constitutional convention in 1865 and later a member of the
legislature. He never married and his death in 1894 on the eightieth
anniversary of his birth was a lone one. Williams, who was gradu-
ated at Hartford, passed his life in Connecticut pastorates, preaching
thirty-four years in the Congregational church at Chaplin. He died
in 1896 in East Hartford. Peabody also was restricted in his labors
for the church, though he served parishes iVi each of the New Eng-
land states. He died at Longmeadow, Mass., a month after Williams'
death.

Of Field's illustrious career the mention must suffice. It is worth
while noticing that even in his later life he took a very decided per-
sonal interest in the doings and progress of the fraternity. He died
in Washington in 1899.

Richards was for ten years principal of the Stillwater (N. Y. )
Academy. He then made Washington, D. C, his home and .taught
many years, besides writing' copiously on educational themes. He



FOUNDERS OF THE FRATERNITY. 15

was the first superintendent of public schools in the national capital.
As alderman of the city he was for a time acting mayor in war times.
The National Educational Association elected him its first president.
He died in 1899 on the anniversary of the fraternity's birth. A son
of Richards is a sophomore member of the present Williams chapter.



Online LibraryDelta UpsilonThe Delta Upsilon decennial catalogue [1903 → online text (page 1 of 161)