E Neil.

The everyday cook and recipe book : containing more than two thousand practical recipes for cooking every kind of meat, fish, poultry, game, soups, broths, vegetables and salads : also for making all kinds of plain and fancy breads, pastries, puddings, cakes, creams, ices, jellies, preserves, marmal online

. (page 15 of 21)
Online LibraryE NeilThe everyday cook and recipe book : containing more than two thousand practical recipes for cooking every kind of meat, fish, poultry, game, soups, broths, vegetables and salads : also for making all kinds of plain and fancy breads, pastries, puddings, cakes, creams, ices, jellies, preserves, marmal → online text (page 15 of 21)
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be made in the same way.

ITALIAN CREAM.

Put one ounce of soaked isinglass, six ounces of loaf-
sugar, half a stick of vanilla, and one pint of milk into a
saucepan; boil slowly; and stir all the time until the isin-
glass is dissolved; strain the mixture, and when a little cool
mix with a pint of thick cream. Beat thoroughly until it
thickens. Pour into large or individual molds, and put in
ice-box until wanted.

TO MAKE BARLEY-SUGAR.

To every pound of sugar allow one-half pint of water,
one-half the white of an egg. Put the sugar into a well-
tinned saucepan, with the water, and when the former is
dissolved, set it over a moderate fire, adding the well-beaten
egg before the mixture gets warm, and stir it well together.
When it boils, remove the scum as it rises, and keep it boil-
ing until no more appears, and the syrup looks perfectly
clear; then strain it through a fine sieve or muslin bag, and
put it back into the saucepan. Boil it again like caramel,
until it is brittle when a little is dropped into a basin of
cold water; it is then sufficiently boiled. Add a little lemon-
juice and a few drops of the essence of lemon, and let it
stand for a minute or two. Have ready a marble slab or
large dish rubbed over with salad oil, pour the sugar on
it, and cut it into strips with a pair of scissors; these strips
should then be twisted, and the barley-sugar stored away in
a very dry place. It may be formed into lozenges or drops,
by dropping the sugar in a very small quantity at a time on
to the oiled slab or dish.



230 THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK.



TO MAKE EVERTON TOFFEE.

One pound of powdered loaf-sugar, one teacupful o!
water, one-quarter pound of butter, six drops of essence of
lemon. Put the water and sugar into a brass pan, and beat
the butter to a cream. When the sugar is dissolved, add
the butter, and k;;ep stirring the mixture over the fire until
it sets when a little is poured on to a buttered dish; and
just before the toffee is done add the essence of lemon.
Butter a dish or tin, pour on it the mixture, and when cool
it will easily separate from the dish. Butter- Scotch, an ex-
cellent thing for coughs, is made with brown, instead of white
sugar, omitting the water, and flavored with one-half ounce
of ginger. It is made in the same manner as toffee.

COCOANUT DROPS.

To one grated cocoanut add half its weight of sugar and
the white of one egg f cut to a stiff froth; mix thoroughly
and drop on buttered white paper or tin sheets. Bake fif-
teen minutes.

MOLASSES CANDY.

One cup of molasses, two cups of sugar, one tablespoon
vinegar, a little butter and vaniila, boil ten minutes, then
cool it enough to pull.

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS.

Two cups of brown sugar, one cup molasses, one cup
chocolate grated fine, one cup of boiled milk, one tablespoon
of flour; butter the size of a large English walnut; let
it boil slowly and pour on flat tins to cool; mark oflf
while warm.



THE E VER YD A Y COOK-BOOK. 231

LEMON CANDY.

Put into a kettle three and one-half pounds of sugar,
one and one-half pints of water, and one teaspoon of cream
of tartar. Let it boil until it becomes brittle when dropped
in cold water; when sufficiently done take off the fire and
pour in a shallow dish which has been greased with a little
butter. When this has cooled so that it can be handled,
add a teaspoon of tartaric acid and the same quantity of
extract of lemon, and work them into the mass. The acid
must be fine and free from lumps. V/ork this in until
evenly distributed, and no more, as it will tend to destroy
the transparency of the candy. This method may be used
for preparing all other candies, as pineapple, etc., using
different flavors.



232 THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK.



DRINKS.



TO MAKE GREEN TEA.

Have ready. a kettle of water boiling fast, pour some into
the teapot, let it remain for a few minutes, then throw it
out; measure a teaspoonful of tea for each two persons, put
it in the pot, pour on it about a gill of boiling water, cover
it close for five minutes, then fill it up; have a covered
pitcher of boiling water with it; when two cups are poured
from it, fill it up; you will thus keep the strength good and
equal. If the company is large, it is best to have some of
the tea drawn in the covered pitcher, and replenish the tea-
pot or urn when it is exhausted.

TO MAKE BLACK TEA.

Make as directed for green tea.

ICED TEA.

Prepare tea in the morning, making it stronger and
sweeter than usual; strain and pour into a clean stone jug
or glass bottle, and set aside in the ice-chest until ready to
use. Drink from goblets without cream. Serve ice broken
in small pieces on a platter nicely garnished with well-washed
grape-leaves. Iced tea may be prepared from either green
or black alone, but it is considered an improvement to mix
the two. Tea made like that for iced tea (or that left in



THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK. 233

the teapot after a meal), with sugar to taste, a slice or two
of lemon, a little of the juice, and some pieces of cracked
ice, makes a delightful drink. Serve in glasses.

TO MAKE COFFEE.

Take a good-sized cupful of ground coffee, and pour into
a quart of boiling water, with the white of an egg and
the crushed shell. Stir well together, adding a half-cupful
of cold water to clear. Put into the coffee-boiler and boil
for about a quarter of an hour; after standing for a little
while to settle, pour into your coffeepot, which should be
well scalded, and send to the table. The coffee should be
stirred as it boils. To make coffee au hit, take a pint each
of hot made coffee and boiling milk ; strain through thin
muslin into coffeepot, to get rid of the grounds, and serve
hot

CHOCOLATE.

Take six tablespoons scraped chocolate, or three of choc-
olate and three of cocoa, dissolve in a quart of boiling water,
boil hard fifteen minutes, add one quart of rich milk, let
scald and serve hot; this is enough for six persons. Cocoa
can also be made after this receipt. Some boil either cocoa
or chocolate only one minute and then serve, while others
make it the day before using, boiling it for one hour, and
when cool skimming off the oil, and when wanted for use,
heat it to the boiling point and add the milk. In this way
it is equally good and much more wholesome. Cocoa is
from the seed of the fruit of a small tropical tree. There
are several forms in which it is sold, the most nutritious
and convenient being chocolate, the next cocoa, then cocoa
nibs, and last cocoa shells. The ground bean is simply
cocoa; ground fine and mixed with sugar it is chocolate;
the beans broken into bits are "nibs." The shells are the
shells of the bean, usually removed before grinding. The



234 THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK.

beans are roasted like coffee", and grouad between hot

rollers.

LEMON SYRUP.

Take the juice of twelve lemons, grate the rind of six in
it, let it stand over night, then take six pounds of white
sugar, and make a thick syrup. When it is quite cool, strain
the juice into it, and squeeze as much oil from the grated
rind as will suit the taste. A tablespoonful in a goblet of
water will make a delicious drink on a hot day, far superior
to that prepared from the stuff commonly sold as lemon
syrup.

STRAWBERRY SYRUP.

Take fine ripe strawberries, crush them in a cloth, and
press the juice from them; to each pint of it put a pint of
simple syrup, boil gently for one hour, then let it become
cold, and bottle it; cork and seal it. When served reduce
it to taste with water, set it on ice, and serve in small tum-
blers half filled.

RASPBERRY SYRUP.

Make as directed for strawberry.

STRAWBERRY SHERBET.

Take fourteen ounces of picked strawberries, crush them
in a mortar, then add to them a quart of water; pour this
into a basin, with a lemon sliced, and a teaspoonful of
orange-flower water; let it remain for two or three hours.
Put eighteen ounces of sugar into another basin, cover it
with a cloth, through which pour the strawberry -juice; after
as much has run through as will, gather up the cloth, and
squeeze out as much juice as possible from it; when the



TRE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK. „ 235

sugar is all dissolved, strain it again; set the vessel con-
taining it on ice, until ready to serve.

RASPBERRY VINEGAR.

To four quarts red raspberries, put enough vinegar to
cover, and let them stand twenty-four hours; scald and
strain it; add a pound of sugar to one pint of juice; boil
it twenty minutes, and bottle; it is then ready for use and
will keep years. To one glass of water add a great spoon-
ful. It is much relished by the sick. Very nice.

LEMONADE.

Take half a pound of loaf-sugar and reduce it to a syrup
with one pint of water; add the rind of five lemons and
let stand an hour; remove the rinds and add the strained
juice of the lemons; add one bottle of "Apollinaris" water,
and a block of ice in centre of bowl. Peel one lemon and
cut it up into thin slices, divide each slice in two, and
put in lemonade. Claret or fine cordials may be added
if desired. Serve with a piece of lemon in each glass.

EGG-NOG.

Whip the whites and yolks of six eggs into a stiff cream,
adding a half cupful of sugar. Pour into a quart of rich
milk, adding a half pint of good brandy, and a little flavor-
ing of nutmeg. Stir up and thoroughly mix the ingredi-
ents, and add the whites of three additional eggs well
whipped.

RAISIN WINE.

Take two pounds of raisins, seed and chop them, ft
lemon, a pound of white sugar, and about two gallons of



235 THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK.

boiling water. Poor into a stone jar, and stir daily for six
or eight days. Strain, bottle, and put in a cool plaoe for
ten days or 60, when the wine will be ready for use*

CURRANT WINE.

The currants should be quite ripe. Stem, mash, and strain
them, adding a half pint of water, and less than a pound of
sugar, to a quart of the mashed fruit. Stir well up together
and pour into a clean cask, leaving the bung-hole open, or
covered with a piece of lace. It should stand for a month
to ferment, when it will be ready for bottling.

GINGER WINE.

One-half pound of cinnamon bark, four ounces of pimento,
two ounces of mace, three-quarters of an ounce of capsi-
cum, three-quarters of a pound of ginger root, five gallons of
alcohol; macerate and strain or filter, after standing fifteen
days. Now make syrup, thirty pounds of white sugar,
half pound of tartaric acid, one and a half pounds of
cream tartar, dissolved with warm water, clarify with whites
of two eggs, and add soft water to make forty gallons.
Color with cochineal and let it stand six months before use.

FINE MILK PUNCH.

Pare off the yellow rind of four large lemons, and steep
it for twenty-four hours in a quart of brandy or rum. Then
mix with it the juice of the lemons, a pound and a half of
loaf-sugar; two grated nutmegs, and a quart of water.
Add a quart of rich unskimmed milk, made boiling hot,
and strain the whole through a jelly-bag. You may either
use it as soon as it is cold, or make a larger quantity (in
the above proportion), and bottle it. It will keep several
months.



THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK, 237

CLARET CUP.

One quart bottle of claret, one bottle of soda water, one
lemon cut very thin, four tablespoons of powdered sugar,
quarter of a teaspoon of grated nutmeg, one liquor glass
of brandy, one wineglass of sherry wine. Half an hour
before it is to be used, put in a large piece of ice, so that it
may get perfectly cold.

ROMAN PUNCH.

Grate the yellow rinds of four lemons and two oranges
upon two pounds of loaf-sugar. Squeeze on the juice of
the lemons and oranges; cover it, and let it stand till next
day. Then strain it through a sieve, add a bottle of cham-
pagne, and the whites of eight eggs beaten to a froth. You
may freeze it or not

CREAM NECTAR.

Dissolve two pounds of crushed sugar in three quarts of
water; boil down to two quarts; drop in the white of an
egg while boiling; then strain, and put in the tartaric acid;
when cold drop in the lemon to your taste; then bottle and
cork. Shake two or three times a day.

RED-CURRANT CORDIAL.

To two quarts of red-currants put one quart of whiskey;
let it stand twenty-four hours, then bruise and strain
through a flannel bag. To every two quarts of this liquor,
add one pound of loaf-sugar, add quarter of a pound of
ginger well bruised and boiled; let the whole stand to set-
tle, then strain or filter; bottle and cork, seal the corks
tightly. It is an improvement to have half red-raspberry
juice if the flavor is liked. The above is flt for use in a
month.



!^3 THE EVERYDAY COOK BOOK.

ELDERBERRY SYRUP.

Take elderberries perfectly ripe, wash and strain th6m,
put a pint of molasses to a pint of the juice, boil it twenty-
minutes, stirring constantly, when cold add to each quart a
pint of French brandy; bottle aad cork it tight. lb ia an
excellent remedy for a cough.



THE EVKHYDAY COOK-BOOK. 259



INVALID COOKERY.



PORT WINE JELLY.

Melt in a little warm water an onnce of isinglass; stir it
into a pint of port wine, adding two ounces of sugar candy,
an ounce of gum-arabic, and half a nutmeg, grated. Mix
all well and boil it ten minutes; or till everything is thor-
oughly dissolved. Then strain it through muslin and set
it away to get cold.

TAPIOCA JELLY.

Wash the tapioca carefully in two or three waters, then
soak it for five or six hours, simmer it then in astewpan un-
til it becomes quite clear, add a little of the juice of a
lemon, wine if desired.

ARROWROOT WINE JELLY.

One cup boiling water, two heaping teaspoons arrowroot,
two heaping teaspoons white sugar, one tablespoonful
brandy or three tablespoonfuls of wine. An excellent cor-
rective to weak bowels.

JELLIED CHICKEN.

Cook six chickens in a small quantity of wafer, until the
meat will part from the bone easily; season to taste with
salt and pepper; just as soon as cold enough to handle, re-
move bones and skin; place meat in a deep pan or mold,
just as it comes from the bone, using gizzard, liver and heart,
until the mold is nearly full. To the water left in the kettle,



240 THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOR.

add three-fourths of a box of Cox's gelatine (some add
juice of lemon), dissolved in a little warm water, and boil
until it is reduced to ajittle less than a quart, pour over the
chicken in the mold, leave to cool, cut with a very sharp
knife and serve. The slices will not easily break up if di-
rections are followed.

CHICKEN BROTH.

Half fowl, or the inferior joints of a whole one, one quart
of water, one blade of mace, half onion, a small bunch of
sweet herbs, salt to taste, ten peppercorns. If a young one
be used for this broth, the inferior joints may be put in the
broth, and the best pieces reserved for dressing in some
otber manner. Put the fowl into a saucepan, with all the
ingredients, and simmer gently for one and a half hours,
carefully skimming the broth well. When done, strain, and
put by in a cool place until wanted; then take all the fat off
the top, warm up as much as may be required, and serve.
This broth is, of course, only for those invalids whose
stomachs are strong enough to digest it, with a flavoring of
herbs, etc. It may be made in the same manner as beef-
tea, with water and salt only; but the preparation will be
but tasteless and insipid. When the invalid cannot digest
this chicken broth with the flavoring, we would recommend
plain beef tea in preference to plain chicken tea, which it
would be without the addition of herbs, onions, etc.

TO MAKE GRUEL.

One tablespoonful of Robinson's patent groats, two table-
epoonfuls of cold water, one pint of boiling water. Mix
the prepared groats smoothly with the cold water in a basin ;
pour over them the boiling water, stirring it all the time. Put
it into a very clean saucepan ; boil the gruel for ten minutes,
keeping it well stirred; sweeten to taste, and serve. It may



THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK. 241

be flavored with a small piece of lemon-peel, by boiling it in
the gruel, or a little grated nutmeg may be put in; but in
these matters the taste of the patient should be consulted-
Pour the gruel in a tumbler and serve. When wine is
allowed to the invalid, two tablespoonfuls of sherry or port
make this preparation very nice. In cases of colds, the
same quantity of spirits is sometimes added instead of wine.



BARLEY WATER.

Put a large tablespoonful of well- washed pearl barley into
a pitcher; pour over it boiling water; cover it, and let it re-
main till cold; then drain off the water; sweeten to taste,
and, if liked, ad J the juice of a lemon, and grated nutmeg.



ARROWROOT BLANC-MANGE.

Put a quart of milk to boil, take an ounce of Bermuda
arrowroot ground fine, make it a smooth batter with cold
milk, add a teaspoonful of salt; when the milk is boiling
hot, stir the batter into it, continue to stir it over a gentle
fire (that it may not be scorched) for three or four minutes,
sweeten to taste with double refined sugar, and flavor with
lemon extract or orange-flower water, or boil a stick of
cinnamon or vanilla bean in the milk before putting in the
arrowroot; dip a mold into cold water, strain the blanc-
mange through a muslin into the mold, when perfectly cold
turn it out; serve currant jelly or jam with it.



LEMONADE FOR INVALIDS.

One-half a lemon, lump sugar to taste, one pint of boil-
ing water. Pare off the rind of the lemon thinly; cut the

lemon into two or three thick slices, and remove as much

M



212 THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK.

as possible of the white outside pith, and all the pips. Put
the slices of lemon, the peel, and lump sugar into a jug;
poar over the boiling water; cover it closely, and in two
hours it will be fit to drink. It should either be strained or
poured off from the sediment.

MUTTON BROTH

Is frequently ordered as a preparation for invalids. For
the sick-room such broth must be made as plainly as pos-
sible, and so a3 to secure the juice of the meat. Boil slowly
a couple of pounds of lean mutton for two hours, skim it
very carefully as it simmers, and do not put in very much
salt. If the doctor permits, some vegetable as seasoning
may be added, and for some broths a little fine barley or
rice is added.

FLAX SEED LEMONADE.

Four tablespoons flax seed (whole), cue quart boiling
water poured on the flax seed, juice of two lemons, leaving
out the peel. Sweeten to taste; stew three hours in a
covered pitcher. If too thick, put in cold water with the
lemon-juice and sugar. Ice for drinking. It is splendid
for colds.

ARROWROOT.

This is very nourishing and light, either for invalids or
infants; make it with milk or water — put a pint of either
into a stewpan, make it boiling hot, add a saltspooniul of
salt, put a heaped teaspoonful of ground Bermuda arrow-
root into a cup, make it smooth with cold milk, stir it into
the stewpan, and let it simmer for two or three minutes;
then turn it into a bowl, sweeten and grate nutmeg over, if
liked; should it be preferred thin, use less arrowroot. This
should be made only as much as is wanted at a tinie r
since it will become as thin as water if heated over.



THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK, 243



STEWED RABBITS IN MILK.

Two very young rabbits, not nearly half grown; one and
one-half pints of milk, one blade of mace, one dessertspoon-
ful of flour, a little salt and Cayenne. Mix the flour very
smoothly with four tablespoonfuls of the milk, and when this
is well-mixed, add the remainder. Cut up the rabbits into
joiDts, put them into a stewpan with the milk and other in-
gredients, and simmer them very gently until quite tender.
Stir the contents from time to time, to keep the milk
smooth and prevent it from burning. Iialf an hour will b^
sufficient for the cooking of this dish.

SLIPPERY-ELM BARK TEA.

Break the bark into bits, pour boiling water over it, cover
and let it infuse until cold. Sweeten, ice, and take for sum-
mer disorders, or add lemon-juice and drink for a bad cold.

BEEF TEA.

One pottnd of lean beef, cut into small pieces. Put into
a jar without a drop of water; cover tightly, and set in a
pot of cold water. Heat gradually to a boil, and continue
this steadily for three or four hours, until the meat is like
white rags, and the juice all drawn out. Season with salt
to taste, and, when cold, skim,

EGG WINE.

One egg, one tablespoonful and one-half glass of cold
water, one glass of sherry, sugar and grated nutmeg to
taste. Beat the egg, mixing with it a tablespoonful of
cold water; make the wine and water hot, but not boiling;
pour it on the egg, stirring all the time. Add sufficient
lump sugar to sweeten the mixture, and a little grated nut-
meg; put all into a very clean saucepan, set it on a gentla



244 THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK.

fire, and stir the contents one way until they thicken, but
do not allow them to boil. Serve in a glass with snippets of
toasted bread or plain crisp biscuits. When the egg is not
warmed, the mixture will be found easier of digestion, but
it is not so pleasant a drink.

TOAST WATER.

Slices of toast, nicely browned, without a symptom of
burning. Enough boiling water to cover them. Cover
closely and let them steep until cold. Strain the water,
sweeten to taste, and put a piece of ice in each glassful.

ONION GRUEL

Is excellent for cold. Slice down a few onions and boil
them in a pint of new milk, stir in a sprinkle of oatmeal and
a very little salt, boil till the onions are quite tender, then
sup rapidly and go to bed.



THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK. 245



COSMETIQUES.



COMPLEXION WASH.

Put in a vial one drachm of benzoin gum in powder, one
drachm nutmeg oil, six drops of orange-blossom tea, or
apple-blossoms put in half pint of rain-water and boiled
down to one teaspoonful and strained, one pint of sherry
wine. Bathe the face morning and night; will remove
all flesh worms and freckles, and give a beautiful com-
plexion. Or, put one ounce of powdered gum of benzoin in
pint of whiskey; to use, put in water in wash-bowl till it is
milky, allowing it to dry without wiping. This is perfectly
harmless.

TO CLEAR A TANNED SKIN.

Wash with a solution of carbonate of soda and a little
lemon-juice; then with Fuller's earth-water, or the juice of
unripe grapes.

OIL TO MAKE THE HAIR CURL.

Olive oil, one pound; oil of organum, one drachm; oil
rosemary, one and one-half drachms.

WRINKLES IN THE SKIN.

White wax, one ounce; strained honey, two ounces; juice
of lily-bulbs, two ounces. The foregoing melted and stirred
together will remove wrinkles.



246 THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK.



PEARL WATER FOR THE FACE.

Put half a pound best Windsor soap scraped fine into
half a gallon of boiling water; stir it well until it cools, add
a pint of spirits of wine and half an ounce of oil of rose-
mary ; stir well. This is a good cosmetique, and will remove
freckles.

PEARL DENTIFRICE.

Prepare chalk, one-half pound; powdered myrrh, two
ounces; camphor, two drachms; orris-root powdered, two
ounces. Moisten the camphor with alcohol and mix all
well together.

WASH FOR A BLOTCHED FACE.

Rose water, three ounces; sulphate of zinc, one
drachm; mix. Wet the face with it, gently dry it and
then touch it over with cold cream, which also gently dry
oft

FACE POWDER.

Take of wheat starch, one pound; powdered orris-root,
three ounces; oil of lemon, thirty drops; oil of bergamot,
oil of cloves, each fifteen drops. Rub thoroughly together.



BANDOLINE.

To one quart of rose-water add an ounce and a half of
gum tragacanth; let it stand forty-eight hours, frequently
straining it, then strain through a coarse linen cloth ; let it
stand two days, and again strain; add to it a drachm of
oil of roses; used by ladies dressing their hair, to make it
iia in any position,



THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK. 247

A GOOD WASH FOR THE HAIR.

One pennyworth of borax, half a pint of olive-oil, one
pint of boiling water.

Mode : Pour the boiling water over the borax and oil; let
it cool; then put the mixture into a bottle. Shake it before
using, and apply it with a flannel. Camphor and boras,
dissolved in boiling water and left to cool, make a very good
wash for the hair; as also does rosemary water mixed with
a little borax. After using any of these washes, when the
hair becomes thoroughly dry, 1 little pomatum or oil
should bo rubbed in, to make it smooth and glossy.



EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK.



MISCELLANEOUS.



AN EXCELLENT HARD SOAP.

Pour twelve quarts soft boiling water on two and one-
half pounds of unslacked lime; dissolve five pounds sal
soda in twelve quarts soft hot water; then mix and let them
remain from twelve to twenty-four hours. Pour off all the


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Online LibraryE NeilThe everyday cook and recipe book : containing more than two thousand practical recipes for cooking every kind of meat, fish, poultry, game, soups, broths, vegetables and salads : also for making all kinds of plain and fancy breads, pastries, puddings, cakes, creams, ices, jellies, preserves, marmal → online text (page 15 of 21)