E Neil.

The everyday cook and recipe book : containing more than two thousand practical recipes for cooking every kind of meat, fish, poultry, game, soups, broths, vegetables and salads : also for making all kinds of plain and fancy breads, pastries, puddings, cakes, creams, ices, jellies, preserves, marmal online

. (page 16 of 21)
Online LibraryE NeilThe everyday cook and recipe book : containing more than two thousand practical recipes for cooking every kind of meat, fish, poultry, game, soups, broths, vegetables and salads : also for making all kinds of plain and fancy breads, pastries, puddings, cakes, creams, ices, jellies, preserves, marmal → online text (page 16 of 21)
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clear fluid, being careful not to allow any of the sediment
to run off; boil three and one-half pounds clean grease and
three or four ounces of rosin in the above lye till the grease
disappears; pour into a box and let it stand a day to stiffen
and then cut in bars. It is as well to put the lime in all
the water and then add the soda. After pouring off the
fluid, add two or three gallons of water and let it stand
with the lime and soda dregs a day or two. This makes an
excellent washing fluid to boil or soak the clothes in, with
one pint in a boiler of water.

TO WASH WOOLEN BLANKETS.

Dissolve soap enough to make a good suds in boiling
water, add a tablespoon of aqua ammonia; when scalding
hot, turn over your blankets. If convenient, use a pounder,
or any way to work thoroughly through the suds without
rubbing on a board. Rinse well in hot water. There is
usually soap enough from the first suds to make the second
soft; if not, add a little soap and ammonia; and after being
put through the wringer let two persons, standing opposite,



THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK. 249

pull them into shape; dry in the sun. White flannels may
be washed in the same way without shrinking. Calicoes
and other colored fabrics can, before washing, be advan-
tageously soaked for a time in a pail of water to which a
spoonful of ox gall has been added. It helps to keep the
color. A teacup of lye to a pail of water will improve the
color of black goods when necessary to wash them, and
vinegar ivs the rinsing water of pink or green will brighten
thos* colors, as will soda for purple and blue.

FOR CLOTHES THAT FADE.

One ounce sugar of lead in a pail of rain water. Soak
over night.

LAMP-WICKS.

To insure a good light, wicks must be changed often, as
they soon become clogged, and do not permit the free pass-
age of the oil. Soaking wicks in vinegar twenty-four hours
before placing in lamp insures a clear flame.

TO MAKE OLD CRAPE LOOK NEARLY
EQUAL TO NEW.

Place a little water in a teakettle, and let it boil until
there is plenty of steam from the spout; then holding the
crape in both hands, pass it to and fro several times
through the steam, and it will be clean and nearly equal to
new.

A CEMENT FOR STOVES.

If the stove is cracked, a good cement is made for it as
follows: "Wood ashes and salt in equal proportions, reduced
to a paste with cold water, and filled in the cracks when the
itove is cool. It will soon harden.



250 THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK.



TO CLEAN KID GLOVES.

Rub with very slightly damp bread-crumbs. If not
effectual, scrape upon them dry Fuller's earth or French
chalk, when on the hands, and rub them quickly together in
all directions. Do this several times. Or put gloves of a
light color on the hands and wash the hands in a basin of
spirits of hartshorn. Some gloves may be washed in a
strong lather made of soft soap and warm water or milk;
or wash with rice pulp; or sponge them well with turpen-
tine, and hang them in a warm place or where there is a
current of air, and all smell of turpentine will be removed.



STAINS AND SPOTS.

Children's clothes, table linens, towels, etc., should be
thoroughly examined before wetting, as soap-suds, washing-
fluids, etc., will fix almost any stain past removal. Many
stains will pass away by being simply washed in pure soft
water; or alcohol will remove, before the articles have been
in soap-suds, many stains. Ironmold, mildew, or almost
any similar spot, can be taken out by dipping in diluted
citric acid; then cover with salt, and lay in the bright sun
until the stain disappears. If of long standing, it may ba
necessary to repeat the wetting and the sunlight. Be care-
ful to rinse in several waters as soon as the stain is no longer
visible. Ink, fruit, wine, and mildew stains must first ba
washed in clear, cold water, removing as much of the spots
as can be; then mix one teaspoonful of oxalic acid and half
a pint of rain water. Dip the stain in this, and wipe off in
clear water. Wash at once, if a fabric that will bear wash-
ing. A tablespoonful of white-currant juice, if any can bo
had, is even better than lemon. This preparation may be
used on the most delicate articles without injury. Shako it



THE EVER YDA Y COOK-BOOK. 251

trp before using it, and be careful and put out of the reach
of meddlers or little folks, as it is poisonous.

TO REMOVE GREASE SPOTS.

An excellent mixture to remove grease spots from boys r
and men's clothing particularly, is made of four parts alco-
hol to one part of ammonia and about half as much ether
as ammonia. Apply the liquid to the grease spot, and then
rub diligently with a sponge and clear water. The chem-
istry of the operation seems to be that the alcohol and ether
dissolve the grease, and the ammonia forms a soap with it
which is washed out with the water. The result is much
more satisfactory than when something is used which only
seems to spread the spot and make it fainter, but does not
actually remove it. If oil is spilt on the carpet, and you
immediately scatter corn meal over it, the oil will be ab-
sorbed by it. Oil may also be removed from carpets on
which you do not dare to put ether and ammonia, by laying
thick blotting paper over it and pressing a hot flat-iron on
it. Repeat the operation several times, using a clean paper
each time.

STAINS ON MARBLE.

Iron-rust stains on marble can usually be removed by
rubbing with lemon-juice. Almost all other stains may be
taken off by mixing one ounce of finely-powdered chalk, one
of pumice stone, and two ounces of common soda. Sift
these together through a fine sieve, and mix with water.
"When thoroughly mixed, rub this mixture over the stains
faithfully and the stains will disappear. Wash the marble
after this with soap and water, dry and polish with a cham-
ois skin, and the marble will look like new.



A thin coating of three parts lard melted with one part
rosin applied to stoves and grates will prevent their rusting
in summer.



252 THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK.



PAINT OR VARNISH.

Oil of turpentine or benzine will remove spots of paint,
varnish, or pitch from white or colored cotton or woolen
goods. After using it they should be washed in soap-suds.

TO REMOVE INK FROM CARPETS.

When freshly spilled, ink can be removed from carpets
by wetting in milk. Take cotton batting and soak up all
of the ink it will receive, being careful not to let it spread.
Then take fresh cotton, wet in milk, and sop it up carefully.
Repeat this operation, changing cotton and milk each time.
After most of the ink has been taken up in this way, with
fresh cotton and clean, rub the spot. Continue till all dis-
appears, then wash the spot in clean warm water and a lit-
tle soap; rinse in clean water, and rub till nearly dry. If
the ink is dried in, we know of no way that will not take
the color from the carpet as well as the ink, unless the ink
is on a white spot. In that case salts of lemon, or soft-
Boap, starch, and lemon-juice will remove the ink as easily
as if on cotton.

TO REMOVE INK FROM PAPER.

Put one pound of cloride of lime to four quarts of water.
Shake well together and let it stand twenty-four hours;
then strain through a clean cotton cloth. Add one tea-
spoonful of acetic acid to one ounce of this prepared lime
water, and apply to the blot, and the ink will disappear.
Absorb the moisture with blotting paper. The remainder
may be bottled, closely corked, and set aside for future use.



An occasional feed of hard-boiled eggs made fine and
mixed with cracker-crumbs is good for canary birds. Feed
a couple of thimblef uls at a time.



13E EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK. 253

INK ON ROSEWOOD OR MAHOGANY.

If ink has been unfortunately spilled on mahogany, rose-
wood, or black walnut furniture, put half a dozen drops of
spirits of nitre into a spoonful of water, and touch the stain
with a feather wet in this; as soon as the ink disappears, rub
the place immediately with a cloth ready wet in cold water,
or the nitre will leave a white spot very difficult to remove,
If after washing off the nitre the ink spot still lingers, make
the mixture a little stronger and use the second time, and
never forget to wash it off at once.

COAL FIRE.

If your coal fire is low, throw on a tablespoon of salt, and
it will help it very much.

POLISH FOR BRIGHT STOVES AND STEEL
ARTICLES.

One tablespoonful of turpentine; one tablespoonful of
sweet oil; emery powder. Mix the turpentine and sweet
oil together, stirring in sufficient emery powder to make the
mixture of the thickness of cream. Put it on the article
with a piece of soft flannel, rub off quickly with another
piece, then polish with a little emery powder and clean
leather.

TO PREVENT PUMPS FROM FREEZING.

Take out the lower valve in the fall, and drive a tack
under it, projecting in such a way that it cannot quite close.
The water will then leak back into the well or cistern,
while the working qualities of the pump will not be dam-
aged.



To keep starch from sticking to irons rub the irons with
a little piece of wax or sperm.



254 THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOg.



TO KEEP OFF MOSQUITOES.

Bub exposed parts with kerosene. The odor is not
noticed after a few minutes, and children especially are
much relieved by its use.

TO BRIGHTEN GILT FRAMES.

Take sufficient flour of sulphur to give a golden tinge to
about one and one-half pints of water, and in this boil four
or five bruised onions or garlic, which will answer the same
purpose. Strain off the liquid, and with it, when cold,
wash, with a soft brush, any gilding which requires restor-
ing, and when dry it will come out as bright as new work.



TO MAKE HENS LAY IN WINTER.

Keep them warm; keep corn constantly by them, but do
not feed it to them. Feed them with meat scraps when lard
or tallow has been tried, or fresh meat. Some chop green
peppers finely, or mix Cayenne pepper with corn meal to
feed them. Let them have a frequent taste of green food, a
little gravel and lime, or clam-shells.

TO PRESERVE STEEL PENS.

Steel pens are destroyed by corrosion from acid in the
ink. Put in the ink some nails or old steel pens, and the
acid will exhaust itself on them, and the pens in use will
not corrode.

MICE.

Pumpkin seeds are very attractive to mice, and traps
baited with them will soon destroy this little pest.



THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK. 255

CAMPHOR

Placed in trunks or drawers will prevent mice from doing
them injury.

TO CLEAN COMBS.

If it can be avoided, never wash combs, as the water often
makes the teeth split, and the tortoiseshell or horn of which
they are made, rough. Small brushes, manufactured pur-
posely for cleaning combs, may be purchased at a trifling
cost; with this the comb should be well brushed, and after-
wards wiped with a cloth or towel.

FOR CLEANING INK-SPOTS.

Ink-spots on the fingers may be instantly removed by
ft little ammonia. Rinse the hands after washing in
clear water. A little ammonia in a few spoonfuls of alcohol
is excellent to sponge silk dresses that have grown " shiny "
or rusty, as well as to take out spots. A silk, particularly
a black, becomes almost like new when so sponged.

FOR CLEANING JEWELRY.

For cleaning jewelry there is nothing better than ammo-
nia and water. If very dull or dirty, rub a little soap on a
soft brush and brush them in this wash, rinse in cold water,
dry first in an old handkerchief, and then rub with buck or
chamois skin. Their freshness and brilliancy when thus
cleaned cannot be surpassed by any compound used by
jewelers.

FOR WASHING SILVER AND SILVERWARE

For washing silver, put half a teaspoonful ammonia into
the suds; have the water hot; wash quickly, using a small
brush, rinse in hot water, and dry with a clean linen towel;



256 THJJ EVERYDAY COOK-BOOR.

then rub very dry with a chamois skin. Washed in this
manner, silver becomes very brilliant, requires no polishing
with any of the powders or whiting usually employed, and
does not wear out. Silver-plate, jewelry and door-plates
-jan bo beautifully cleaned and made to look like new by
dropping a soft cloth or chamois skin into a weak prepara-
tion of ammonia-water, and rubbing the articles with it.
Put half a teaspoonful into clear water to wash tumblers or
glass of any kind, rinse and dry well, and they will be beau-
tifully clear.

FOR WASHING GLASS AND GLASSWARE.

For washing windows, looking-glasses, etc., a little am-
monia in the water saves much labor, aside from giving a
better polish than anything else; and for general house-
cleaning it removes dirt, smoke and grease most effect-
ually,

INSECTS AND VERMIN.

Dissolve two pounds of alum in three or four quarts of
water. Let it remain over night, till all the alum is dis-
solved. Then, with a brush, apply* boiling hot, to every
joint or crevice in the closet or shelves where Groton bugs,
ants, cockroaches, etc., intrude; also to the joints and crev-
ices of bedsteads, as bed bugs dislike it as much as Croton
bugs, roaches or ants. Brush all the cracks in the floor
and mop-boards. Keep it boiling hot while using.

To keep woolens and furs from moths, two things are to
be observed — first, to see that none are in the articles when
they are put away, and second, to put them where the
parent moth cannot enter. Tin cases, soldered tight,
whiskey barrels headed so that not even a liquid can
get in or out, have been used to keep out moths. A
piece of strong brown paper with not a hole through



THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK. 257

which even a large pin can enter, is just as good. Put the
articles in a close box and cover every joint with paper, or
resort to whatever will be a complete covering. A wrapper
of common cotton cloth, so put around and secured, is
often used. Wherever a knitting needle will pass the par-
ent moth can enter. Carefully exclude the insect and the
articles will be safe.

MOTHS IN CARPETS.

Persons troubled with carpet moths may get rid of them
by scrubbing the floor with strong hot salt and water before
laying the carpet, and sprinkling the carpet with salt once a
week before sweeping.

SMOOTH SAD-IRONS.

To have your sad-irons clean and smooth rub them first
with a piece of wax tied in a cloth, and afterwards scour
them on a paper or thick cloth strewn with coarse salt



TO SWEETEN MEAT.

A little charcoal thrown into the pot will sweeten «neat
that is a little old. Not if it is anyway tainted — it is then
not fit to eat — but only if kept a little longer than makes
it quite fresh.

STOVE POLISH.

Stove lustre, when mixed with turpentine and applied in
the usual manner, is blacker, more glossy and more durable
than when mixed with any other liquid. The turpentine
prevents rust, and when put on an old rusty stove will make,
it look as well as new.



258 THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK.

CLEANING WHITE PAINT.

Spirits of ammonia, used in sufficient quantity to soften
the water, and ordinary hard soap, will make the paint look
white and clean with half the effort of any other method I
ever have tried. Care should be taken not to have too much
ammonia, or the paint will be injured.

TO CLEANSE THE INSIDE OF JARS.

This can be done in a few minutes by filling the jars with
hot water (it need not bo scalding hot), and then stirring in
a teaspoonful or more of baking soda. Shake well, then
empty the jar at once, and if any of the former odor re-
mains about it, fill again with water and soda; shake well,
and rinse out in cold water.

FURNITURE POLISH.

Equal proportions of linseed oil, turpentine, vinegar, and
spirits of wine.

Mode : When used, shake the mixture well, and rub on
the furniture with a piece of linen rag, and polish with a clean
duster. Vinegar and oil, rubbed in with flannel, and the
furniture rubbed with a clean duster, produce a very good
polish.

Squeaking doors ought to have the hinges oiled by a
feather dipped in some linseed oil.



A soft cloth, wetted in alcohol, is excellent to wipe off
French plate-glass and mirrors.



A red-hot iron will soften old putty so that it can be
easily removed.



THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK, 259



TO REMOVE STAINS FROM MATTRESSES.

Make a thick paste by wetting starch with cold water.
Spread this on the stain, first putting the mattress in the
sun; rub this off after an hour or so, and if the ticking is
not clean try the process again.

KALSOMINING.

For plain white use one pound white glue, twenty pounds
English whiting; dissolve glue by boiling in about three
pints of water; dissolve whiting with hot water; make the
consistency of thick batter; then add glue and one cup soft
soap. Dissolve a piece of alum the size of a hen's egg, add
and mix the whole thoroughly. Let it cool before using.
If too thick to spread nicely add more water till it spreads
easily. For blue tints add five cents' worth of Prussian blue,
and a little Venetian red for lavender. For peach-blow use
red in white alone. The above quantity is enough to cover
four ceilings, sixteen feet square, with two coats, and will
not rub off as the whitewash does made of lime.

PAPERING WHITEWASHED WALLS.

There are many ways, but we mention those that
are the most reliable. Take a perfectly clean broom,
and wet the walls all over with clean water; then
with a small sharp hoe or scraper scrape off all the
old whitewash you can. Then cut your paper of the
right length, and, when you are all ready to put on
the paper, wet the wall with strong vinegar. Another
way is to make very thin paste by dissolving one pound of
white glue in five quarts of warm water, and wash the walla
with it before putting on the paper. A very good way is to ap-
ply the paste to both paper and wall. The paste may be made
from either wheat or rye flour, but must be put on waj-m,



260 THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK.



HOW TO CLEAN CORSETS.

Take out the steels at front and sides, then scrub thor-
oughly with tepid or cold lather of white castile soap, using
a very small scrubbing brush. Do not lay them in water.
When quite clean let cold water run on them freely from
the spigot to rinse out the soap thoroughly. Dry without
ironing (after pulling lengthwise until they are straight and
shapely) in a cool place.

TO CLEAN HAIRBRUSHES.

Do not use soap, but put a tablespoon of hartshorn into
the water, having it only tepid, and dip up and down until
clean; then dry with the brushes down, and they will be
like new ones. If you do not have ammonia, use soda; a
teaspoonful dissolved in the water will do very welL

HOW TO WASH FLANNELS.

There are many conflicting theories in regard to the
proper way to wash flannels, but I am convinced, from care-
ful observation, that the true way is to wash them in water
in which you can comfortably bear your hand. Make suds
before putting the flannels in, and do not rub soap on the
flannel. I make it a rule to have only one piece of flannel
put in the tub at a time. Wash in two suds if much soiled,
then rinse thoroughly in clean, weak suds, wring, and hang
up; but do not take flannels out of warm water and hang
out in a freezing air, as that certainly tends to shrink
them. It is better to dry them in the house, unless the sun
shines. In washing worsted goods, such as men's panta-
loons, pursue the same course, only do not wring them, but
hang them up and let them drain; while a little damp bring
iu and press smoothly with as hot an iron as you can use



THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK. 261

without scorching the goods. The reason for not wringing
them is to prevent wrinkles.



CLEANING LACE.

Cream-colored Spanish lace can be cleaned and made to
look like new by rubbing it in dry flour; rub as if you were
washing in water. Then take it outdoors and shake all the
flour out; if not perfectly clean, repeat the rubbing in a
little more clean flour. The flour must be very thoroughly
shaken from the lace, or the result will be far from satis-
factory. White knitted hoods can be cleaned in this way;
babies' socks also, if only slightly soiled.



NEW KETTLES.

The best way to prepare a new iron kettle for use is to
fill it with clean potato peelings, boil them for an hour or
more, then wash the kettle with hot water; wipe it dry, and
rub it with a little lard; repeat the rubbing for half a
dozen times after using. In this way you will prevent rust
and all the annoyances liable to occur in the use of a new
kettle.

TO KEEP FLIES OFF GILT FRAMES.

Boil three or four onions in a pint of water and apply
with a soft brush.

TO PREVENT KNIVES FROM RUSTING.

In laying aside knives, or other steel implements, they
should be slightly oiled and wrapped in tissue paper to pre-
vent their rusting. A salty atmosphere will in a short time
quite ruin all steel articles, unless some such precaution is
taken.



262 THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK.



CEMENT FOR GLASSWARE.

For mending valuable glass objects, -which would be dis-
figured by common cement, chrome cement may be used.
This is a mixture of five parts of gelatine to one of a solu-
tion of acid chromate of lime. The broken edges are cov-
ered with this, pressed together and exposed to sunlight,
the effect of the latter being to render the compound in-
soluble even in boiling water.

WATERPROOF PAPER.

Excellent paper for packing may be made of old news-
papers; the tougher the paper of course the better. A
mixture is made of copal varnish, boiled linseed oil and tur-
pentine, in equal parts. It is painted on the paper with a
flat varnish brush an inch and a half wide, and the sheets
are laid out to dry for a few minutes. This paper has been
very successfully used for packing plants for sending long
distances, and is probably equal to the paper commonly
used by nurserymen.

RECIPE FOR VIOLET INK.

To make one gallon, take one ounce of violet analine;
dissolve it in one gill of hot alcohol. Stir it a few moments.
When thoroughly dissolved add one gallon of boiling water,
and the ink is made. As the analine colors vary a great
deal in quality, the amount of dilution must vary with the
sample used and the shade determined by triaL

PERSPIRATION.

The unpleasant odor produced by perspiration is fre-
quently the source of vexation to persons who are sub-
ject to it. Nothing is simpler than to remove this odor



TBE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK. 263

much more effectually than by the application of such
costly unguents and perfumes as are in use. It is only
necessary to procure some of the compound spirits of
ammonia, and place about two tablespoonfuls in a basin
of water. Washing the face, hands, and arms with this
leaves the skin as clean, sweet and fresh as one could
wish. The wash is perfectly harmless and very cheap.
It is recommended on the authority of an experienced
physician.

RENEWING OLD KID GLOVES.

Make a thick mucilage by boiling a handful of flax-seed;
add a little dissolved toilet soap; then, when the mixture
cools, put the glove on the hands and rub them with a piece
of white flannel wet with the mixture. Do not wet the
gloves through.

COLOGNE WATER.

Take a pint of alcohol and put in thirty drops of oil of
lemon, thirty of bergamot, and half a gill of water. If musk
or lavender is desired, add the same quantity of each. The
oils should be put in the alcohol and shaken well before the
water is added. Bottle it for use.

TO CLEANSE A SPONGE.

By rubbing a fresh lemon thoroughly into a soured sponge
and rinsing it several times in lukewarm water, it will be-
come as sweet as when new.

ICY WINDOWS.

Windows may be kept free from ice and polished by rub-
bing the glass with a sponge dipped in alcohol.



To remove blood stains from cloth, saturate with kerosene,
and after standing a little, wash in warm water.



264 THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK,



CAMPHOR ICE.

One ounce of lard, one ounce of spermaceti, one ounce of
camphor, one ounce of almond oil, one-half cake of white
wax; melt and turn into molds.

STARCH POLISH.

Take one ounce of spermaceti and one ounce of white
wax, melt and run it into a thin cake on a plate. A piece
the size of a quarter dollar added to a quart of prepared
starch gives a beautiful lustre to the clothes and prevents
the iron from sticking.

TO CLEAN FEATHERS.

Cover the feathers with a paste made of pipe-clay and
water, rubbing them one way only. When quite dry, shake
off all the powder and curl with a knife. Grebe feathers
may be washed with white soap in soft water.

TO TEST NUTMEGS.

To test nutmegs prick them with a pin, and if they are
good the oil will instantly spread around the puncture.

TO CLEAN MICA.

Mica in stoves, when smoked, is readily cleaned by taking
it out and thoroughly washing with vinegar a little diluted.


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Online LibraryE NeilThe everyday cook and recipe book : containing more than two thousand practical recipes for cooking every kind of meat, fish, poultry, game, soups, broths, vegetables and salads : also for making all kinds of plain and fancy breads, pastries, puddings, cakes, creams, ices, jellies, preserves, marmal → online text (page 16 of 21)