E Neil.

The everyday cook and recipe book : containing more than two thousand practical recipes for cooking every kind of meat, fish, poultry, game, soups, broths, vegetables and salads : also for making all kinds of plain and fancy breads, pastries, puddings, cakes, creams, ices, jellies, preserves, marmal online

. (page 17 of 21)
Online LibraryE NeilThe everyday cook and recipe book : containing more than two thousand practical recipes for cooking every kind of meat, fish, poultry, game, soups, broths, vegetables and salads : also for making all kinds of plain and fancy breads, pastries, puddings, cakes, creams, ices, jellies, preserves, marmal → online text (page 17 of 21)
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If the black does not come off at once, let it soak a
little.

TO SOFTEN HARD WATER.

Add half a pound of the best quick lime, dissolved in
water'to every hundred gallons. Smaller proportions may,
be more conveniantly managed, and if allowed to stand a



THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK. 2G5

short time the lime will have united with the carbonate of
lime and been deposited at the bottom of the receptacle.
Another way is to put gallon of lye into a barrelful of
water.

TO DESTROY VERMIN IN THE HAIR.

Powdered cevadilla one ocmce, powdered staves-acre one
ounce, powdered panby seed one ounce, powdered tobacco
one ounce. Mix well and rub among the roots of the hair
thoroughly.

TO REMOVE BRUISES FROM FURNITURE.

Wet the bruised spot with warm water. Soak a piece of
brown paper of several thicknesses in warm water, and lay
over the place. Then apply a warm flat-iron until the
moisture is gone. Repeat the process if needful, and the
bruise will disappear.

PEARL SMELLING SALTS.

Powdered carbonate of ammonia, one ounce; strong solu-
tion of ammonia, half a fluid ounce; oil of rosemary, ten
drops; oil of bergamot, ten drops. Mix, and while moist
put in a wide mouthed bottle which is to be well closed.

POUNDED GLASS.

Pounded glass, mixed with dry corn-meal, and placed
within the reach of rats, it is said, will banish them from
the premises; or sprinkle Cayenne, pepper in their holes.

POLISH FOR BOOTS.

Take of ivory-black and treacle each four ounces; sul-
phuric acid, one ounce; best olive oil, two spoonfuls, best
white-wine vinegar, three half pints; mix the ivory-black



266 THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK.

and treacle well in an earthen jar; then aid the sulphurio
acid, continuing to stir the mixture; next pour in the oil,
and, lastly, add the vinegar, stirring it in by degrees until '
thoroughly incorporated.

TO CLEAN PLATE.

"Wash the plate well to remove all grease, in a strong
lather of common yellow soap and boiling water, and wipe
it quite dry; then mix as much hartshorn powder as wilt
be required, into a thick paste, with cold water or spirits of
wine; smear this lightly over the plate with a piece of soft
rag, and leave it for some little time to dry. When per-
fectly dry, brush it off quite clean with a soft plate-brush,
and polish the plate with a dry leather. If the plate be very
dirty, or much tarnished, spirits of vane will be found to
answer better than water for mixing the paste.



TO CLEAN DECANTERS.

Roll up in small pieces some soft brown or blotting
paper; wet them, and soap them well. Put them into the
decanters about one-quarter full of warm water; shake
them well for a few moments, then rinse with clear cold water;
wipe the outsides with a nice dry cloth, put the decanters
to drain, and when dry they will be almost as bright as new
ones,

SPOTS ON TOWELS AND HOSIERY.

Spots on towels and hosiery will disappear with little
trouble if a little ammonia is put into enough water to soak
the articles, and they are left in it an hour or two before
washing; and if a cupful is put into the water .in which
white clothes are soaked the night before washing, the ease
with which the articles can be washed, and their great



THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK. 267

whiteness and clearness when dried will be very gratifying.
Remembering the small sum paid for three quarts of am-
monia of common strength, one can easily see that no
bleaching preparation can be more cheaply obtained.

No articles in kitchen use are so likely to be neglected
and abused as the dish-cloths and dish-towels; and in
washing these, ammonia, if properly used, is a greater com-
fort than anywhere else. Put a teaspoonful into the
water in which these cloths are, or should be washed every
day; rub soap on the towels. Put them in the water; let
them stand a half hour or so, then rub them out thoroughly,
rinse faithfully, and dry out-doors in clear air and sun, and
dish-cloths and towels need never look gray and dingy — a
perpetual discomfort to all housekeepers.



CROUP.

Croup, it is said, can be cured in one minute, and the
remedy is simply alum and sugar. The way to accom-
plish the deed is to take a knife or grater, and shave off in
small particles about a teaspoonful of alum; then mix it
with twice its amount of sugar, to make it palatable, and
administer it as quickly as possible. Almost instantaneous
relief will follow.



In the summer season it is not an nncommon thing for
persons going into the woods to be poisoned by contact with
dogwood, ivy, or the poisoned oak. The severe itching and
smarting which is thus produced may be relieved by first
washing the parts with a solution of saleratus, two tea-
spoonfuls to the pint of water, and then applying cloths
wet with extract of hamammellis. Take a dose of Epsom
salts internally or a double Rochelle powder.



268 THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK.



CONVULSION FITS.

Convulsion fits sometimes follow [the feverish restless-
ness produced by these causes; in which case s, hot bath
should be administered without delay, and the lower parts
of the body rubbed, the bath being as hot as it can be with-
out scalding the tender skin.

BURNS AND SCALDS.

A burn or scald is always painful; but the pain can be in-
stantly relieved by the use of bi-carbonato of soda, or com-
mon baking soda (saleratus). Put two tablespoonfuls of
soda in a half cup of water. Wet a piece of linen cloth in
the solution and lay it on the burn. The pain will disap-
pear as if by magic. If the burn is so deep that the skin
has peeled of£ dredge the dry soda directly on the part af-
fected.

CUTS.

For a slight cut there is nothing better to control the
hemorrhage than common unglazed brown wrapping paper,
such as is used by marketmen and grocers; a piece to be
bound over the wound.

COLD ON THE CHEST.

A flannel dipped in boiling water, and sprinkled with tur-
pentine, laid on the chest as quickly as possible, will re-
lieve the most severe cold or hoarseness*

BLEEDING FROM THE NOSE.

Many children, especially those of a sanguineous
temperament, are subject to sudden discharges of blood
from some part of the body; and as all such fluxes are
in general the result of an effort of nature to relieve the



THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK. 269

system from some overload or pressure, such discharges,
unless in excess, and when likely to produce debility, should
not be rashly or too abruptly checked. In general, these
discharges are confined to the summer or spring months of
the year, and follow pains in the head, a sense of drowsi-
ness, languor or oppression, and as such symptoms are re-
lieved by the loss of blood, the hemorrhage should, to a
certain extent, be encouraged. When, however, the bleed-
ing is excessive, or returns too frequently, it becomes neces-
sary to apply means to subdue or mitigate the amount. For
this purpose the sudden and unexpected application of cold
is itself sufficient in most cases to arrest the most active
hemorrhage. A wet towel laid suddenly on the back, be-
tween the shoulders, and placing the child in a recumbent
posture is often sufficient to effect the object; where, how-
ever, the effusion resists such simple means, napkins wrung
out of cold water must be laid across the forehead and
nose, the hands dipped in cold water, and a bottle of hot
water applied to the feet. If, in spite of these means, the
bleeding continues, a little fine wool or a few folds of lint,
tied together by a piece of thread, must be pushed up the
nostril from which the blood flows; to act as a plug and
pressure on the bleeding vessel. When the discharge has
entirely ceased, the plug is to be pulled out by means of
the thread. To prevent a repetition of the hemorrhage, the
body should be sponged every morning with cold water,
and the child put under a course of steel wine, have open-
air exercise, and, if possible, salt water bathing. For chil-
dren, a key suddenly dropped down the back between the
skin and clothes, will often immediately arrest a copious
bleeding.

CHILBLAINS.

Chilblains are most irritating to children. Th9 following
is an infallible cure for unbroken chilblains: Hydrochloric



270 THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK.

acid, diluted, one-quarter ounce; hydrocyanic acid, diluted,
30 drops; camphor -water, six ounces. This chilblain lotion
cares mild cases by one application. It is a deadly poison,
and should be kept under lock and key. A responsible
person should apply it to the feet of children. This must
not bo applied to broken chilblains.



TO CURE A STING OF BEE OR WASP.

Mis common earth with water to about the consistency
of mud. Apply at once.

FOR TOOTHACHE.

Alum reduced to an impalpable powder, two drachms;
nitrous spirit of ether, seven drachms; mix and apply to
the tooth.

CHOKING.

A piece of food lodged in the throat may sometimes be
pushed down with the finger, or removed with a hairpin
quickly straightened and hooked at the end, or by two or
three vigorous blows on the back between the shoulders.



A very excellent carminative powder for flatulant infants
may be kept in the he use, and employed with advantage,
whenever the child is in pain or griped, by dropping five
grains of oil of aniseed and two of peppermint on half an
ounce of lump sugar, and rubbing it in a mortar, with a
drachm of magnesia, into a fine powder. A small quantity
of this may be given in a little water at any time, and al-
ways with benefit.



TBE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOR. -271



CUBEB BERRIES FOR CATARRH.

A new remedy for catarrh is crushed cubeb berries
Bmoked in a pipe, emitting the smoke through the nose;
after a few trials this will be easy to do. If the nose is
stopped up so that it is almost impossible to breath, one
pipeful will make the head as clear as a bell. For sore
throat, asthma, and bronchitis, swallowing the smoke effects
immediate relief. It is the best remedy in the world for
offensive breath, and will make the most foul breath pure
and sweet. Sufferers from that horrid disease, ulcerated
catarrh, will find this remedy unequaled, and a month's use
will cure the most obstinate case. A single trial will con-
vince anyone. Eating the uncrushed berries is also good
for sore throat and all bronchial complaints. After smok-
ing, do not expose yourself to cold air for at *least fifteen
minutes.

DIARRHOEA.

For any form, of diarrhoea that, by excessive action, de-
mands a speedy correction, the most efficacious remedy
that can be employed in all ages and conditiocs of child-
hood is the tincture of kino, of which from ten to thirty
drops, mixed with a little sugar and water in a spoon, are
to be given every two or three hours till the undue action
has been checked. Often the change of diet to rice, milk,
eggs, or the substitution of animal for vegetable food vice
versa, will correct an unpleasant and almost chronic state of
diarrhoea.



If it is not convenient to fill flannel bags for the sick
room with sand, bran will answer the purpose very well,
and will retain the heat a long time.



272 THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK.



BITES OF DOGS.

The only safe remedy in case of a bite from a dog su9»
pected of madness, is to burn out the wound thoroughly
with red-hot iron, or with lunar caustic, for fully eight sec-
onds, so as to destroy the entire surface of the wound. Do
this as soon as possible, for no time is to be lost. Of
course it will be expected that the parts touched with the
caustic will turn black.

MEASLES AND SCARLATINA.

Measles and scarlatina much resemble each other in their
early stages; headache, restlessness, and fretfulness are the
symptoms of both. Shivering fits, succeeded by a hot skin;
pains in the back and limbs, accompanied by sickness, and,
in severe cases, sore throat; pain about the jaws, difficulty
in swallowing, running at the eyes, which become red and
inflamed, while the face is hot and flushed, often distinguish
scarlatina from scarlet fever, of which it is only a mild form.
"While the case is doubtful, a dessertspoonful of spirit of
nitre diluted in water, given at bedtime, will throw the child
into a gentle perspiration, and will bring out the rash in
either case. In measles, this appears first on the face; in
scarlatina, on the chest; and in both cases, a doctor should
be called in. In scarlatina, tartar-emetic powder or ipeca-
cuhana may be administered in the meantime.

STYE IN THE EYE.

Styes are little abscesses which form between the rocts of
the eyelashes, and are rarely larger than a small pea. The
bast way to manage them is to bathe them frequently with
warm water; or in warm poppy-water, if very painful.
When they have burst, use an ointment composed of
one part of citron ointment and four of spermaceti,



THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK. 278

well rubbed together, and smear along the edge of
the eyelid. Give a grain or two of calomel with five or
eight grains of rhubarb, according to the age of the child,
twice a week. The old-fashioned and apparently absurd
practice of rubbing the stye with a ring, is as good and
speedy a cure as that by any process of medicinal applica*
tion; though the number of times it is rubbed, or the
quality of the ring and direction of the strokes, has nothing
to do with its success. That pressure and the friction ox-
cite the vessels of the part, and cause an absorption of tho
effused matter under the eyelash. The edge of the nail
will answer as well as a ring.

FOR CONSTIPATION.

One or two figs eaten fastly is sufficient for some, and
they are especially good in the case of children, as there is
no trouble in getting them to take them. A spoon of
wheaten bran in a glass of water is a simple remedy and
quite effective.

LEANNESS

Is caused generally by lack of power in the digestive
organs to digest and assimilate the fat-producing elements
of food. First restore digestion, take plenty of sleep, drink
all the water the stomach will bear in the morning on rising,
take moderate exercise in the open air, eat oatmeal, cracked
wheat, Graham mush, baked sweet apples, roasted and
broiled beef, cultivate jolly people, and bathe daily.

SUPERFLUOUS HAIRS

Are best left alone. Shaving only increases the strength
of the hair, and all depilatories are dangerous and some-
times disfigure the face. The only sure plan is to spread
on a piece of leather equal parts of garbanum and pitch



274 THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK.

plaster, lay it on the hair as smoothly as possible, let it re-
main three or four minutes, then remove it with the hairs,
root and branch. This is severe, but effective. Kerosene
will also remove them. If sore after using, rub on sweet
oiL

THE BREATH.

Nothing makes one so disagreeable to others as a bad
breath. It is caused by bad teeth, diseased stomach, or dis-
ease of the nostrils. Neatness and care of the health will
prevent and cure it.

THE QUININE CURE FOR DRUNKENNESS.

Pulverize one pound of fresh quill-red Peruvian bark,
and soak it in one pint of diluted alcohol. Strain and
evaporate down to one-half pint. For the first and second
days give a teaspoonful every three hours. If too much is
taken, headache will result, and in that case the doses should
be diminished. On the third day give one-half a teaspoon-
ful; on the fourth reduce the dose to fifteen drops, then to
ten, and then to five. Seven days, it is said, will cure aver-
age cases, though some require a whole month.

FOR SORE THROAT.

Cut slices of salt pork or fat bacon; simmer a few mo-
ments in hot vinegar, and apply to throat as hot as possible.
When this is taken off, as the throat is relieved, put around
a bandage of soft flannel. A gargle of equal parts of borax
and alum, dissolved in water, is also excellent To be used
frequently.

A GOOD CURE FOR COLDS.

Boil two ounces of flaxseed in one quart of water;
strain and add two ounces of rock candy, one-half pint



THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK. 275

of honey, juice of three lemons; mix, and let all boil well; let
cool, and bottle. Dose: One cupful on going to bed, one-
half cupful before meals. The hotter you drink it the bet-
ter.

TO STOP BLEEDING.

A handful of flour bound on the cut.

A HEALTHFUL APPETIZER.

How often we hear women who do their own cooking
say that by the time they have prepared a meal, and it is
ready for the table, they are too tired to eat. One way to
mitigate this is to take, about half an hour before dinner, a
raw egg, beat it until light, put in a little sugar and milk,
flavor it, and "drink it down;" it will remove the faint,
tired-out feeling, and will not spoil your appetite for din-
ner.

TO REMOVE DISCOLORATION FROM
BRUISES.

Apply a cloth wrung out in very hot water, and renew
frequently until the pain ceases. Or apply raw beefsteak.

EARACHE.

There is scarcely any ache to which children are subject
so hard to bear and difficult to cure as the earache; but
there is a remedy never known to fail. Take a bit of cot-
ton batting, put upon it a pinch of black pepper, gather it
up and tie it, dip in sweet oil and insert into the ear; put
a flannel bandage over the head to keep it warm. It will
give immediate relief. As soon as any soreness is felt in
the ear, let three or four drops of the tincture of arnica be
poured in and the orifice be filled with a little cotton wool
to exclude the air. If the arnica be not resorted to until



276 THE EVEEYDAf COOK-BOOK.

there is actual pain, then the cure may not be as speedy,
but it is just as certain, although it may be necessary to re-
peat the operation. It is a sure preventive against gather-
ing in the ear, which is the usual cause of earache.



TO CURE TOOTHACHE.

The worst toothache, or neuralgia coming from the teeth,
may be speedily and delightfully ended by the application
of a bit of clean cotton, saturated in a solution of ammonia,
to the defective tooth. Sometimes the late sufferer is
prompted to momentary laughter by the application, but
the pain will disappear.

FOR FELON.

Take common rock salt, as used for salting down pork or
beef, dry in an oven, and pound it fine and mix with spirits
of turpentine in equal parts; put it in a rag and wrap it
around the parts affected; as it gets dry put on more, and
in twenty-four hours you are cured. The felon will be dead.



Coffee pounded in a mortar and roasted on an iron plate;
sugar burned on hot coals, and vinegar boiled with myrrh
and sprinkled on the floor and furniture of a sick room, are
excellent deodorisers.



The skin of a boiled egg is the most efficacious remedy that
can be applied to a boil. Peel it carefully, wet and apply
to the part affected. It will draw off the matter, and relieve
the soreness in a few hours.



THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK. 277



TO CURE A WHITLOW.

As soon as the whitflow has risen distinctly, a pretty large
piece should be snipped out, so that the watery matter may
readily escape, and continue to flow out as fast as produced.
A bread and water poultice should be put on for a few
days, when the wound should be bound up lightly with
some mild ointment} when a cure will be speedily completed.
Constant poulticing both before and after the opening of
the whitlow is the only practice needed; but as the matter
lie^ deep, when it is necessary to open the abscess, the incis-
ion must be made deep to reach the suppuration,

TAPE-WORMS.

Tape-worms are said to be removed by refraining from
supper and breakfast, and at eight o'clock taking one-third
part of two hundred minced pumpkin seeds, the shells of
which have been removed by hot water; at nine take an-
other third, at ten the remainder, and follow it at eleven
with strong dose of castor oil.

FOR A CAKED BREAST.

Bake large potatoes, put two or more in a woolen stock-
ing; crush them soft and apply to the breast as hot as can
be borne; repeat constantly till relieved.



A good remedy for blistered feet from long walking is to
rub the feet at going to bed with spirits mixed with tallow
dropped from a lighted candle into the palm of the hand.



A lady writes that sufferers from asthma should get a
muskrat skin and wear it over their lungs, with the fur
side next to the body. It will bring certain reliet



278 THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK.



CHAPPED HANDS.

Powdered starch is an excellent preventive of chapping
of the hands, when it is rubbed over them after washing
and drying them thoroughly. It will also prevent the
needle in sewing from sticking and becoming rusty. It is
therefore advisable to have a small box of it in the work-box
or basket, and near your wash-basin.

LUNAR CAUSTIC.

Lunar caustic, carefully applied so as not to touch the
skin, will destroy warts.

CURE FOR RHEUMATISM AND BILIOUS
HEADACHE.

Finest Turkey rhubarb, half an ounce; carbonate mag-
nesia, one ounce; mix intimately; keep well corked in glass
bottle. Dose: One teaspoonful, in milk and sugar, the first
thing in the morning; repeat till cured. Tried with success.

FEVER AND AGUE.

Four ounces galangal-root in a quart of gin, steeped in a
warm place; take often.



For a oimple fainting fit a horizontal position and fresh
air will usually suffice. If a person receive a severe shock
caused by a fall or blow, handle carefully without jarring.
A horizontal position is best. Loosen all tight clothing
from the throat, chest, and waist. If the patient can swal-
low, give half teaspoonful aromatic spirits of ammonia in a
little water. If that cannot be procured, give whiskey or
brandy and water. Apply warmth to the feet and bowela



THE E VER YD A Y COOK-BOOK. 278

TO RESTORE FROM STROKE OF LIGHT-
NING.

Shower with cold water for two hours; if the patient does
not show signs of life, put salt in the water, and continue
to shower an hour longer.

RELIEF FOR INFLAMED FEET,

The first thing to be done is to take off and throw away
tight-fitting boots, which hurt the tender feet as much as if
they were put into a press. Then take one pint of wheat
bran and one ounce of saleratus, and put it into a foot-bath,
and add one gallon of hot water. When it has become
cool enough put in the feet, soak them for fifteen minutes,
and the relief will be almost immediate. Repeat this every
night for a week, and the cure will be complete. The burn-
ing, prickly sensation is caused by the pores of the skin be-
ing closed up so tightly by the pressure of the boots that
they cannot perspire freely.

WARM WATER.

Warm water is preferable to cold water as a drink to per-
sons who are subject to dyspeptic and bilious complaints,
and it may be taken more freely than cold water, and con-
sequently answers better as a diluent for carrying off bile,
and removing obstructions in the urinary secretion, incases
of stone and gravel. When water of a temperature equal
to that of the human body is used for drink, it proves con-
siderably stimulant, and is particularly suited to dyspetic,
bilious, gouty, and chlorotic subjects.

CLEANING HOUSE.

SITTING AND DINING-ROOMS.

By the time the upper part of the house is well cleaned
and in good order, if it has been taken one room at a time.



280 THE EVERYDAY COOK-BOOK.

and leisurely, probably, the dining-room can be torn up on
a warm and pleasant day, and, unless the alterations are to.
be extensive, scoured and gotten to rights again before
nightfall. And the sitting-room on another day. House-
cleaning, unless conducted on some plan which occasions
little if any disturbance in the general domestic arrange-
ment, is a nuisance, particularly to the males of the house-
hold. Nothing can be (next to a miserable dinner) more
exasperating to a tired man, than to come home and find
the house topsy-turvy. And it certainly raises his opinion
of his wife's executive ability to find everything freshened
and brightened, and that without his having been annoyed
by the odor of the soapsuds, or yet having been obliged to
betake himself to the kitchen for his meals.

But if the order of work is well laid out the night before-
hand, the breakfast as leisurely eaten as usual, and the
family dispersed in their various ways before commencing
operations, then by working with a will wonders can be ac-
complished in a very short time. It is not worth while to
undertake a thorough cleaning of all extra china, silver and
glassware, which may be stored in the china closet in ad-
ditition to the room itself. They can readily wait over un-
til another morning, as can the examination of table-linen.
In cleaning any room after the furniture and carpets have
.been taken out and the dust swept out with a damp broom,
the proper order is to begin with the ceiling, then take the
walls and windows, and lastly the floor. Kalsomining or
whitewash dries most quickly when exposed to free draughts


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Online LibraryE NeilThe everyday cook and recipe book : containing more than two thousand practical recipes for cooking every kind of meat, fish, poultry, game, soups, broths, vegetables and salads : also for making all kinds of plain and fancy breads, pastries, puddings, cakes, creams, ices, jellies, preserves, marmal → online text (page 17 of 21)