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165



THF^NEW YORK

MARKET




Compiled by the Research Department of

The New York Herald



The

New York

Market



'^



Compiled hy the Resemch Department of

The New York Herald



Copyright 1922 by The New York Herald






Foreword



JVIany people know New York City only in a general, indefinite
way as the largest city in the world and the richest and the busiest
city in the world. They may be well ac(]uainted with some small
part of the city — usually some part of the borough of Manhattan —
hut the great city as a whole remains undefined, easily dismissed
with superlative adjectives.

This attitude is common among New Yorkers as well as among
others. The average New Yorker knows little of his city.

Among certain advertisers the magnitude of New York has caused-
a feeling of hesitation and fear. They realize that it is the most
profitable market, once captured — but they are afraid that it is too
difficult a market to capture and hold.

This attitude has been caused to a large extent by the scarcity of
detailed commercial information about New York City. Adver-
tisers seeking to familiarize themselves with this market have been
forced to be content with superlative generalities that are interest-
ing but of little practical value.

The New York Market is the largest and wealthiest market in the
world. It has the greatest sales possibilities, no matter what
product is considered. Contrary to belief in some quarters, how-
ever, it is not a difficult market to enter and develop. Any manu-
facturer with resources who is so-minded can sell his product
profitably in New York. There is more room for a larger number
of products and brands here than anywhere else in the world.



;)CI.A683213



-^ti AUG -^1922



Foreword

{Continued)



ivND no large market is easier to understand than New York. The
division of Metropolitan New York into New York City and the
well defined suburban territory, the division of New York City into
the five separate boroughs, and the division of the boroughs into
separate sections — each with their peculiar characteristics — make a
study of the New York Market simple as well as instructive and
profitable.

This book is a reference manual of the New York Market. It is
a collection of valuable detailed information which advertisers have
heretofore been obliged to gather and co-ordinate from a variety of
sources.

It is not concerned primarily with demonstrating the obvious — that
the New York Market is the largest market in the world. It contains,
therefore, but few comparisons between New York and other
markets. It shows, rather, -ic/iat New York is and why it is the
greatest market. Its purpose is to give advertisers and others an
opportunity to knoic New York. The information given is necessarily
detailed in nature.

Part I is an analysis of New York City in terms of the number and
distribution, the composition and characteristics of the people. Part
II is a population analysis of the rich suburban territory outside
New York City. Part III is a sectional analysis of New York City
in which each borough is broken up into well defined sections.

The facts published arc compiled from the most authentic sources.
A large part of them are from the 1920 Federal Census which has
opened up a wealth of information. Many of the more detailed census
reports have been issued only within the past few months. Almost
all the information is from some governmental source — city, state
or federal. The figures used are the latest available at the time of
compilation, June 1922.









Index

PART I












Composi


tion


and Characteristics of
of New York City


the


Population








ADULTS, by Boroughs, Nativity..l4
AREA, by Boroughs

AUTOMOBILES. Registered; In-
crease in: Passenger Cars; Pas-
senger Cars per 100 Families —
by Boroughs

BANKS, National, State. Trust
Citm]>anies, Number and Re-


15
9

31
29

.29
14

40

22

25
14
12


EMPLOYMENT, Number of Men
ani:I Women — by Boroughs ;
Number in General Occupa-
tions : Number in Specific Oc-
cupations 32, 33, 34

EXPENDITURES, Annual, by


35

37

7
21

39

30

38

12

21

19
19
19


PERSONS, Population— by Bor-
oughs

Increase — by Boroughs

Number in New York Compared

with Other Large Cities

Per Family — by Boroughs

By Age Groups

Males and Females l:

White and Colored

PERSONAL ESTATE, Valuation,

by Boroughs

PROFESSIONAL Men and


7

8
9

13
, 13

16

29

36
29
37

.24

25

31

38
38
38

12
12
12






FAMILIES, Number — by Bor-












Savings Banks, Number — by Bor-
oughs ; Depositors. Number and
Increase — by Boroughs; Depos-
its. Amount and Increase — by
Boroughs ; Deposits per De-
positor 26, 27. 28

BIRTHS


HOMES. Number Owned and
Rented — by Boroughs; Mort-
gaged and Free; Equipped
with Electricity

INCOME TAX RETURNS, in

New York City; in New York
Stale — by Classes of Incomes....

MANUFACTURES. Number of
Establishments; Persons En-
gaged ; Value of Products

MARRIED Men and Women — by
Ages

NATIONALITIES of Foreign
Born Whites 20

NATIVITY. Native Whites of Na-
tive Parentage — by Boroughs.... 16
Native Whites of Foreign Par-
entage — by Boroughs 17

Foreign Born Whites — by Bor-






REAL ESTATE, Valuation






SALARIES and Wages, Trend of
SCHOOLS, Number, Registra-
tion and Graduates 23

STUDENTS, Number — by Age
Groups and by Boroughs

TAXICABS. Number Licensed
and Volume of Business

TELEPHONES. Number in Use,
by Boroughs






BUILDINGS Increase in






CITIZENSHIP, Foreign Born
Whites .






COLLEGES. Number; Registra-
tion : Graduates ; Graduates Re-
siding in New York 24

DEATHS






Number of Calls

UNMARRIED Men and Women,
by Ages

WIDOWS






DIVORCED. Men; Women






DWELLINGS. Kinds; Number-
by Boroughs; Persons per
Dwelling: Families per Dwell-
ing — by Boroughs






WIDOWERS








PART II












Meiropolita


nN


ew York — Fifty Mile Radius of City Hall








AREA — Territory, Counties,

States 42, 50,

POPULATION. Total: Divisions

City and Suburban 42, 4,1,

By States 42.


57
42

44
44


By Boroughs

Immensity

Suburban, Total: Divisions

By States 45

By Classes of Cities 46, 47

PART III


58
49

45
58


Cities, Towns and Villages —
By States and Size Groups 50

Recapitulation — By Classes of
Cities, States and Boroughs....

RETAIL OUTLETS, Number,


, 57
58
58
















s


actional Analysis of New Y


ork City








THE CITY


62

-67
-79
79
72
78
-86
86
85
81




-98
98
96
92

122
120

121

22
06


Richmond: Sections 123-

Good Sections 125,

Fair Sections —

124, 126, 127, 130. 131,


-132
129

132

128

134
135






THE FIVE BOROUGHS: De-

sciiptioii and Population Analy-
sis 6.1


Good Sections 93, 94, 97,

Fair Sections 88, 90, 91, 95,

Poor Sections 87, 89,

Queens; Sections and Districts.... 99-

Sections 100, 103, 109, 114,

Good Districts —

105, 108, 110. 113, 118, 119,

Fair Districts —

107. Ill, 112, 115. 116, 117,
Poor Districts 101, 102, 104,






Manhattan: Sections 68

Good Sections 73, 74, 76,

Fair Sections 69, 71,

Poor Sections 68, 70, 75, 77,

Bronx: Sections 80






APPENDIX:






Fair Sections 83, 84.

Poor Sections 80,






Map of Metropolitan New York





Part I.



The Five Boroughs of
NEW YORK CITY

Composition

and characteristics of the

population



Introduction to Part I.



For the intelligent marketing of a product in any given locality it
is necessary to know something of the people in that locality. This
becomes all the more imperative when a city the size of New York
is the locality under consideration.

How many pet)ple live in New Ycjrk? What kind of people and
how many of each kind? In what parts of the city is there the
greatest concentration of population? How arc the people em-
ployed? In what sort of homes do they live? How much do they
spend? Such questions as these are vital to all manufacturers, no
matter what their products may be.

The pages in Part I analyze the population of New York City in
terms of the number and distribution, composition and characteristics
of the inhabitants. In most instances the information given is for
each of the five boroughs separately as well as for the entire city.
The fact that the majority of the figures used are from the 1920
Federal Census (most of which has but recently been issued) makes
these figures the only authority that will be available for a number
of years, since there is no source other than the Census for such
detailed information.

A valuable feature are the tables that give not only numbers, but
percentages as well. The percentages can be used long after the
numbers themselves have changed.



Distribution of Population in NewYork

7v[ umber of Persons

/according to the Census of 1920, the popuhition of New York City is
5,620,048 — an increase of 17.9 per cent, over the 1910 popuhition of 4,766,883.
Of this city population:



Distribution by Boroughs




Manliattan has 2,284,103 — a
decrease of 2 per cent, over the
1910 population of 2,331,542.

Brooklyn has 2.018,356— an in-
crease of 23.5 per cent, over the
1910 population of 1,634,351.

Bronx has 732,016 — an increase
of 69.8 per cent, over the 1910
population of 430,980.

Queens lias 46'', 042 — an in-
crease of 65.1 per cent, over the
1910 population of 284,041.

RicluiKind has 116,531 — an in-
crease of 35.6 per cent, over the
1910 population of 85,969.



Manhattan has 40.6 per cent.
of the total city population.

Brooklyn has 35.8 per cent.

Bronx has 13.1 per cent.

Queens has 8.4 per cent.

Richmond has 2.1 per cent.



Number of Families



There are 1,278,341 families in New ^'orli Cit\-. Of these:
Manhaltan has 525,154 — or 41.1 per cent.
Brooklyn has 453,587 — or 35.5 per cent.
Bronx has 166,260 — or 13.0 per cent.

Queens has 109,559 — or 8.6 per cent.
Rielunond has 23,781 — or 1.8 per cent.



Visualizing New York's Population

Comparisons with Other Great Cities



JNew York City's pc^pulation is larger
than the combined population of the next
three largest cities in the country — Chi-
cago, Philadelphia and Detroit. It has
42 per cent, of the combined population
of the seven largest cities in the country.




The Seven La^-^eft
CiheS' in -the
United States'




The pii|nil;itiiins of tlie s e v e n
largest cities in the United States
are as follows:

New ^'ork .... 5,620,048

Chicago 2,701,705

Philadelphia . . . 1,823.779

Detroit 993,678

Ten Ai. FOR Four

Largest Crnns . 11,139,210

Cleveland .... 796,841

St. Louis .... 772,897

Boston 748,060

Total for S e v il n

Largest Cities . 13,457,008



New York is more than twice as large as
Chicago in population and more than
three times as large as Philadelphia.

The boroughs of Maniiattan and Brook-
lyn each have a larger population than
the city of Philadelphia.



ri>,b<lelplua(

Derroit
Cle^eUfiJ^
5t LoiiisI

Boston



■2




?". ozo.o-ta




\


90O


\ J


■\;


\ J



Compiled by the Research Department of

The New York Herald



Distribution of Population in New York

T^umher of Persons per Family : Density

1 llli average family in New York is composed of 4.4 persons. Richmond
has the hirgest average family with 4.9 persons. The persons per family in
the other boroughs is as follows:

Maniiattan, 4.34; Brooklyn, 4.44; Bronx, 4.40; Queens, 4.28.
Size of Boroughs in Square Miles




The areas of the live boroughs in order of their territorial sizes are as follows:



CJuccns 108 square miles or 36.1 per cent.

Brooklyn

Ricliniond

Uronx

Manhattan



71 •■


" 23.7 " "


57 "


" 19.1 " "


41


" " 13.7 " "


22


" 7.4 " "



Total Chy 299 sciiiare miles or 100.0 per cent.

Manhattan, with the largest population, is smallest in land area.

Queens, next to the smallest borough in population, is the largest by far in
land area.

Cdiii pilcil hy the Research Department of

The New York Herald



Distribution of Population in New York

?s[umber of Families per Dwelling

NiiW York Cnv lias a total of M5,\')() (Iwcllintis, with a ilciisit\ of 14.0 persons per (hvellinp;
— or 3.4 families per dwelling.

Manhattan- has 7.^.0.^0 clwellin<is and 7.2 families per dwelling. Manhattan averages more-
families per dwelling than any of the other l)(jroughs because of the great nmnber of large
apartment houses and famil\' liotels.

Bronx has 3.^,483 dwellings and 4. 'J families per dwelling.
Urooklvn has the largest number of dwellings — 175,868, and 2.6 families per dwelling.



'Families'



Ma-rtlaattan
7.2%




Families' pet*
DweltiTV^ for
eixti-re City-J.4%



J3t-ookyn

2.6;



Q>aeen^



■l5^



Rn cVxtrxo i\ d.

1.1%




<Jc.i-i..\s ha> 7(J,'^51 dwelling-, and 1.5 families pei' duelling.

RjcHMONlj has 21,864 dwellings and 1.1 families jier dwelling. It has tlie least congested
dwellings of all the borouglis.

Kinds of Dwellings

Urooklyn has the laigest nunilier of one and t\\c)-famil\ houses, (jueens is second in both classi-
fications.

Hrookl\n also has the largest numbei' of tenements and a|)artment buildings without elevators.
Manhattan is second.

Manhattan has by far the largest nundier of elevator apartment houses and hotels.
(j'linpilcil hy the Rcscardi Dcpiirtincnl iij

The New York Herald



10



^



Distribution of Population in New York

Persons per Square Mile

T IIK density of New \'<)i"k City is IS.7'^6.2 persons per si]uare mile. There
are 299 siiuare miles in the entire eity of New ^'ork.

The ilensity of the entire Tnited States is ,>5.5 persons per scjuare mile. The
density of Massaehusetts is hut 479.2; of New ^'ork vState, 217.9.

Mami.VI'I'.W leads in density with 1(),\S22.9 persons per square mile,
it is, the most thiekly populated seetion of the United States.
Bkooki.^X is next, with a density of 28,427.5 persons per square mile.
Bronx has a density of 17,S54.() persons per sijuare mile.
(Jl l:l:ns has a density of 4,.H.'i.() persons per square mile.
Richmond is last with 2.044.4 persons per S(|uare mile.

Sex Ratio in New York

There are more women than men in .\e\v \ ork City. In 1920 the males
numbered 2,H02,638 — or 49.9 per cent. 'The females numtiered 2,S17.410 —
or 50. 1 per cent.

'The ratio of males to females is 99. > to 100.

In the entire I'nited States, howe\er, the table is reversed and there are
more men than women -the ratio beint; 104 males to every 100 females.



(jiiiDpiltil hy the Rruarch Dcpiirtniriit of

The New York Herald



n



Distribution of Population in NewYork

Married and Unmarried Men and Women

i HERE arc 2,001,025 men and boys 15 years of age and over in New York.
City. Of these, 1,143,643 — or 57.2 per cent. — are married; and 761,197 —
or 38. per cent. — arc single. The widowers number 78,999; the divorced
men number 4,303.

There are 2,026,797 women and girls 15 years uf age and over. ()f these,
1,1 15,670 — or 55.0 per cent. — are married; and 667,247 — or 32.9 per cent. —
arc single. The widows number 232,991 ; the divorced women number 6,775.

That women marry at younger ages than men is shown by the fact that of
the 530,325 females between the agjs of 15 and 24 years, 131,404— (jr 24.8
per cent. — are married; while of the 469,093 males of the same ages, only
47,841 — or 10.2 per cent. — arc married.

Of the 986,446 men between 25 and 44 years, 681,120 — «jr 69 per cent. — are
married. Of the 956,309 women of the same ages, 691,369 — -or 72.3 per cent.
— are married.

Of the 540,844 men over 45 years of age. 413,438 — or 76.4 per cent. — arc
married. Of the 537,000 women of the same ages, 291,640 — or 54.3 per cent.
— are married.

There are, in addition, 1,244 married men and 1,257 married women whose
ages are unknown.

The largest number of widowers and widows is in the age group of 45 years
and over. The largest number of divorced men and women is in the age
group of 25 to 44 years.

ConipUrd hy llic Rcsearih Dcpartmetit of

The New York Herald



12



The Characteristics of the Population

Population Grouped b)' Age.s

i HERE arc l.5''2,226 persons in New \nyk City below 15 years of age —
or 28 per cent, of the total population.

Of these, SO 1, 6 1, ^ are males and 7V().6I,^ are females.

There are 4,027,822 persons 15 years of age and over — or 72 per cent, of the
total population. Of these, 2,001,025 are males and 2,026,797 are females.
Total Population: 5,«20,048 TI,o,e a.cl, 077,844 per-

sons 45 Ncars of ay;c antl
over — or 10.2 per cent.
(it the total population.
Of those, 540,844 are
n-.alcs and 5.57,000 arc
females.

I'hcre arc 2,674,290 per-
sons between tlie ages of
18 and 44 — or 47.0 per
cent, of the total popu-
lation. Of these, 1,324,-
.398 are males and 1,349,-
892 are females.

Cliiidien under one year
of .i^e nuniher i08,''()8.
Ot these 55,168 are
males and 53,740 are fe-
males.




IJndei- 5 M'ais
5-9
10-14
15-19
20-44
45 and over
.A!4;e Unknown

ToiAl,



Male

283,873
269,45!
248,289
219,332
1,236,207
540,844
4,642

2,802,638



Fcmalr
27b.')')h
267,039
246,578
234,426
1,252,208
537,000
3,163

2,817,410





Fri ('.nil.




i)j Tiitiil


I'lllll


Pdpitlfttiori


560,869


10.0


536,490


9.5


494,867


8.8


453,758


8.1


2,488,415


44.3


1,077,844


19.2


7,805


.1


5.620,048


100.0



(Uiiiipilcd h\ flu- Rcsctirdi Depart iiicii I nj

The New York Herald



13



The Characteristics of the Population



Population Grouped b)i Ages

(ConlinucJ)



i HERE arc ,\476,()42 persons over 21 years of age — or 62 per cent, of the
total population. Of these, 1,737,043 arc males and 1,738,999 are females.



Births and Deaths

The infants born an-
nually in New York
number 134,240. This
is the figure for 1921,
indicating a rate per
1,000 population of
23.44. In 1Q16, 1,U,644
infants were born. In
1010, 130,377.

The number of deaths in
New York City in 1921
was 64,257. This is a
death rate of 11.17 jier
1,00 population. In
1916, the deaths num-
bered 77,801. In 1919,
74,433.



Persons 21 Years of Age and Over — By Nativity




In addition, (here are 6,870 Indians, Chinese, .lapanesc
;infl ()llu'rs. 21 yrars iif :\vv and (txcr



Persons 21 Years of Age and Over

Fi-m<ilr.i

742,403
599,606
221,798
142,875
32,317





.1/ «/(-.(


Manhattan


738,890


Brooklyn


601,605


Bronx-


218,214


Queens


140,657


Richmond


37,578



Total



1,737,043



1,738,999



Total

1,481,302

1.201,301

440,012

283,532

69,895

3,476,042



C'ltnpdcd by the Reicnrch Department of

The New York Herald



14



The Characteristics of the Population

Persons 11 Tears of Age and Over in the
Five Boroughs, b)i T^ativity



850,000
800,000
750,000
700,000
650,000
600,000
550,000
500,000
450,000
400,000
350,000
250,000
200.000
150,000
100.000
50,000



Foreign Born
Whites

Manhattan.. 827,420

Brooklyn .... 59.?.266

Bronx 243,093

Queens 105,012

Richmond .. 29,091



Total Citv.. 1.797,882



Native Whites
Native Parentage

Manhattan.... 242,332

Brooklyn 239,892

Bronx 63,464

Queens 68,088

Richmond .... 20,090

Total City 633,866



Native Whites
Foreign Parentage

Brooklyn 344.477

Manhattan.... 324.388

Bronx 130,290

Queens 106,851

Richmond .... 19,677

Total Citv 925,683




C'jinpUed by the Rcsc/in h Dcpnrtiitnit of

The New York Herald



15



The Characteristics of the Population

White and Colored



Of the 5,620,04S persons in New York City,
— are Whites, and 152,467 — or 2.7 per cent. — ;

The Chinese, Japanese, Indians and all others
0.2 per cent.

Total Population, 5,r)20,048




5,459,463— or 97.1 per cent.
ire Negroes.

constitute 8, IIH persons — or



The Negro population in-
creased 66.9 per cent.
since 1910. The White
poinilation increased 16.9
per cent. 'Ilie total popu-
lation increased 17.9 per
cent.

Native Whites of
Native Parentage

Of the 5,620,048 persons
in New \'ork City, 1,164,-
834 — or 20.7 per cent, of
the total population — are
Native Whites of Native
Parentage (both parents
horn in the United States).

Of the Native Whites of
Native Parentage, 633,866
— or 54.4 per cent. — are
21 years of age and over.
Of these the males number
31 1.083 and the females
322,783.



Manhattan
Hrooklyn
Bronx .
Queens
Richmond



N/ilivi- H' hill's .
Niiti-vr Pitrnitaffc

388,279
456,240
132,770
149,342
38,203



Total Citv



,164,834



Prrrrnt. of

lioroiif///

Population

17.0
22.6
18.1
31.8
32.8



20.7



I'ncnil. of N. IV..
Native Parcnluijc,
in C.ily

},},.},

39.2

11.4

12.8

l.i



100.0



Compiled hy the Research Dep/irlment of

The New York Herald



IG



The Characteristics of the Population



J^lative Whites of J^ative Parentage

{Cniiliiiitrd)



Ln the actual number of Nati\c Whites of Nati\i' Parentage Hrookhn leads all the boroughs.
Manhattan is next. The other boroughs folhnv in this order: Queens, Hronx, Richmond.
In the percentage of total borough population that is Native White of Native Parentage, Rich-
mond leads all the boroughs. Queens is next. 'I'he other boroughs follow in the order named :
Brooklyn, Bronx, Manhattan.



Native Whites of Foreign Parentage

Of the 5,t)2(),()4S persons in New \\)\\ City, 2,,^(),^,(),S2 — or 41.0 percent of the total popula-
tion — aie Natixe Born Whites of Foreign Parentage (either one or both parents of foreign
birth). Of these, 1,87.?, 01.3 — or M.i per cent, of the total population — are Native Whites of
parents both of whom were foreign born; and 4.?0, ()()'' — or 7.7 per cent, of the total popula-
tion — arc Native Whites of parents one of whom \\ as foreign born.

Of the ,\ati\e Born Whites of Foreign Parentage, '*25,()iS3 — or 40.2 per cent, are 21 jcars
of age and o\er. Of these, 438,304 are males and 487,37'' are females.



I'll I, -111. Ill I'm nil. Ill N. H.,

Niilivi' H'/iilis. liiiiiiiii/li Fin riijii I'm riil/ii/r,

I'liiciijn I'm riiliii/r I'lif'iiliiliiiii in I'.ily

Manhattan . . . 858,547 37.6 37.3

Brooki\n . . . 809,420 43.1 37.7

Bronx .327,240 44.7 14.2

(Queens .... 202,043 43.2 8.8

Richmond . . . 45,217 38.8 2.0



Total Cit\ . 2,303,082 41.0 100.0



Brooklyn has the largest number of Native Whites of I'orcign Parentage. Manhattan is next.
The other boroughs follow in this order: Bronx, Queens, Richmond.

Bronx leads all the boroughs in the percentage of total iKjrough population that is Xati\e White
of Foreign Parentage. Queens is next. 'Fhe other boroughs follow closeU in this order:
BrookKii, Richmond, Manhattan.



Cotiipilcd hy the Research Definrtnietit of

The New York Herald



17



The Characteristics of the Population

Foreign Born Whites

Or the 5,620,()4S persons in New York City, 1,991,547— or 35.4 per cent.—
are Foreign Born Whites.

Of these Foreign Born Whites, l,797,SS2— or 90.3 per cent.— are 21 years of
age and over; 927,742 are males and 870,140 are females.

The number of Foreign Born Whites increased 63,844 since 1910. Their
percentage of the total population, however, decreased. In 1910, 40.4 per
cent, of the people were Foreign Born \A'hites. In 1920 — the percentage
was 35.4.





l''otrii/rr Hin n




H'liiirs


ALmliattaii .


M22, OSO


BrookUii .


650,287


Bronx . . .


266,971


Queens


111,676


Richmond


31,533


Total Citv


. 1,991,547



/'(■/( nit. iii I'm nil. n) I'. II.

Hill oiii/h I'lipiiliiliiiii H' liitcs in C.ily



40.4
32.7
36.5
23.8
27.1

35.4



46.3

33.1

13.4

5.6

1.6

lUU.U



Manhattan of all the horoughs has hy far the lar;i:est numher of Foreign Born Whites. Brook-
lyn is second. The other boroughs follow in this order: Bronx, Queens, Richmond.

The percentage of Foreign Born Whites in the total horougli ]iiiinil,ition is also highest in Man-
hattan. Bronx is second. The other Boroughs follow in this onlei": !?rookl\n, Richmond,
Queens.

Bronx alone of the five horoughs has now a larger percentage of I'Oreign Born Whites in its
otal population than in 1910. The increase was from 34.6 per cent, in 1910 to 36.5 per cent, in
1920. In all tlie other horouglis the percentage of Foreign Born W'hites was smaller in 1920
than in 1910.



Criinpitrd by the Rcsetirrit Department of



The New York Herald







The Characteristics of the Population


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