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BETTY WALES
ON THE CAMPUS



by
MARGARET WARDE

,L r
author o



BETTY
BETTY
BETTY
BETTY
BETTY
BETTY
BETTY



Of

WALES, FRESHMAN
WALES, SOPHOMORE
WALES, JUNIOR
WALES, SENIOR
WALES, B.A.
WALES & CO.
WALES DECIDES




ILLUSTRATED BY
EVA M. NAGEL





THE PENN PUBLISHING
COMPANY, PHILADELPHIA

1920








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<







COPYEIGHT
1910 BY
THEPENN

PUBLISHING
COMPANY




Betty Wales on the Campus



c t - c c c

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Introduction

MOST of the girls in this story first became
acquainted with each other in their freshman
year at Harding College, and the story of
their four jolly years together and their trip
to Europe after graduation is told in " Betty
Wales, Freshman," " Betty Wales, Sopho-
more," " Betty Wales, Junior," " Betty Wales,
Senior," and " Betty Wales, B. A."

It was during this memorable trip that
Betty met Mr. Morton, the irascible but gen-
erous railroad magnate. " Betty Wales &
Co." describes how Betty and her " little
friends ' opened the successful " Tally-ho
Tea-Shop' in Harding, and what came of it.
Babbie Hildreth's engagement to Mr. Thayer
was one result, and another was that Mr.
Morton gave to Harding College the money
for a dormitory for the poorer girls. Betty's
"smallest sister ' Dorothy was also in Hard-
ing attending Miss Dick's school, and it was
"5 -for her that Eugenia Ford invented the de-

3



X



4 INTRODUCTION

lightful Ploshkin. Somebody modeled one,
and as little plaster ploshkins were soon being
sold everywhere, it turned out to be one of
the Tally-ho's most popular and profitable
features. Betty had thought she would leave
the shop to Emily Davis and return to her fam-
ily, but this story tells how she found herself
again on the Harding Campus. And finally,
how Betty Wales, with the aid of one other
important person, chose her career and left
Harding, will be found in " Betty Wales
Decides."

MARGARET WARDE.



Contents

I. "TENDING UP'' AGAIN ... 9

II. ARCHITECT'S PLANS AND OTHERS . 29

III. THE CULT OF THE B. C. A.'s . . 47

IV. THE GRASSHOPPER WAGER . . 62
V. REINFORCEMENTS .... 78

VI. FRISKY FENTON'S MARTYRDOM . . 98
VII. THE DOLL WAVE . . . .116
VIII. MORE ARCHITECT'S PLANS, AND A MYS-
TERY ...... 140

IX. MOVING IN 158

X. GHOSTS AND INSPIRATIONS . . .174

XI. WHAT CHRISTMAS REALLY MEANS . 191

XII. RAFAEL PROPOSES .... 213

XIII. GENIUS ARRIVES .... 229

XIV. As A BULL PUP ORDAINS . . . 249

XV. A GAME OF HIDE-AND-SEEK. WITH

"FEATURES" ..... 268

XVI. THE MYSTERY DEEPENS . . . 285

XVII. THE MYSTERY SOLVED . . . 299

XVIII. FRISKY FENTON'S FOLLY . . .318

XIX. ARCHITECT'S FINAL PLANS CONSID-
ERED 337



Illustrations



PAGB



THEY WERE ALL THERE . , . Frontispiece

"I'M SORRY I WAS LATE " . . . .11

SITTING DOWN TO REST ON A BAGGAGE TRUCK . 84

"You MUST TAKE OFF YOUR APRON ' . . 160

JUST AS THEY HAD GIVEN HER UP . . . 241

THE OTHERS STOOD AROUND LISTENING . . 282

" WE'LL FIND 'EM, Miss," HE ASSURED HER . 327



Betty Wales on the Campus.

7



Betty Wales On The

Campus



CHAPTER I

" TENDING UP " AGAIN

BETTY WALES, with a red bandanna knotted
tightly over all her yellow curls except one or
two particularly rebellious ringlets that posi-
tively refused to be hidden pattered softly
down the back stairs of the Wales cottage at
Lakeside. Softly, because mother was taking
her afternoon nap and must on no account be
disturbed. Betty lifted a lid of the kitchen
range, peered anxiously in at the glowing
coals, and nodded approvingly at them for
being so nice and red. Then she opened the
ice-box, just for the supreme satisfaction of
gazing once more upon the six big tomatoes
that she had peeled and put away to cool
right after lunch which is the only proper
time to begin getting dinner for a fastidious

9



io BETTT WALES

family like hers. Finally she slipped on over
her bathing suit the raincoat that hung on
her arm, and carefully opened the front door.
On the piazza the Smallest Sister and a smaller
friend were cozily ensconced in the hammock,
" talking secrets," as they explained eagerly
to Betty.

" But you can come and talk too," they
assured her in a happy chorus, for Betty was
the idol of all the little girls in the Lakeside
colony.

Betty smiled at them and pulled back the
raincoat to show what was underneath.
" Thank you, dears, but I'm going for a dip
while the sun is hot. And Dorothy, don't
forget that you've said that you'd stay here
and see to everything till I get back. And if
more girls come up, don't make a lot of noise
and wake mother. Good-bye/ 5 And she was
off like the wind down the path to the beach
staircase.

Half a dozen welcoming shouts greeted her
from the sand.

" We've waited ages for you," cried one.

" Dare you to slide down on the rail,"
called another.




"I'M SORRY i WAS LATE"



.








* ^

,v^S



ON THE CAMPUS n

" No, slide down the bank," suggested a
third.

Betty gave her head a funny little toss,
threw the raincoat down to one of them and
slid, ran, jumped, and tumbled down the
sheer bank, landing in a heap on a mound of
soft sand that flew up in a dusty cloud around
the party.

" I'm sorry," she sputtered, wiping the dust
out of her eyes. " Sorry that I was late, I
mean. The sand is Don's fault, because he
dared me. You see, I had to mend all Will's
stockings, because he's going off to-morrow on
a little business trip. And then I had to see
to my fire, and remind Dorothy that she is
now in charge of mother and the house. Beat
you out to the raft, Mary."

Mary Hooper shook off her share of the
sand-cloud resignedly. " All right," she
said. " Only of course I've been in once al-
ready, and I'm rather tired."

" Tired nothing," scoffed one of the Benson
girls. " You paddled around the cove for five
minutes an hour ago, poor thing ! That's all
the exercise you've had to-day. Betty's the
one who ought to be tired, with all the cook-



12 BETTT WALES

ing and scrubbing and mending she does.
Only she's a regular young steam engine "

Betty leaned forward and tumbled Sallie
Benson over on her back in the sand.
" Hush ! " she said. " I don't work hard, and
I'm not tired, and besides, I shall probably
lose the race. Come along, Mary."

The race was a tie, but Betty declared that
Tom Benson got in her way on purpose, and
Mary Hooper retorted that Sally splashed her
like a whole school of porpoises. So they
finally agreed to try again going back, and
then they sat on the raft in the sunshine,
throwing sticks for Mary's setter to swim after,
and watching the Ames boys dive, until Will
appeared on the shore shouting and waving a
letter wildly an incentive to Betty's getting
back in a hurry that caused Mary to declare
the return race off also, especially as she had
lost it.

" Didn't want to bother you," explained
Will amiably, " but Cousin Joe drove me out
in his car, and I thought that maybe the
chief cook "

Betty seized the letter and ran. " I knew
things were going to happen," she murmured



THE CAMPUS 13

as she flopped up the beach stairway. " But
there's an extra tomato that my prophetic
soul told me to peel, and lots of soup, and lots
of ice-cream. Oh, dear, I'm getting this letter
so wet that I shan't ever be able to read it."
She held it out at arm's length and looked at
the address. It was typewritten, and there
was a printed " Return to Harding College'
in the corner. " Nothing but an old circular,
I suppose, 1 ' she decided, and laid it carefully
down in a spot of yellow sunshine on the floor
of her room to dry off.

Of course there was no time to open it until
dinner was cooked and eaten ; and then Cousin
Joe piled his big car full of laughing, chatter-
ing young people and drove them off through
the pine woods in the moonlight.

Betty was in front with Cousin Joe.
" Things look so much more enchanted and
fairylike if you're in front," she explained as
she climbed in.

Cousin Joe chuckled. " You always have
some good reason for wanting to sit in front,
young lady," he said. " When you were a
kid, you had to be where you could cluck to
the horses. But I certainly didn't suppose



I 4 BETTT WALES

you went in for moonlight and fairies and
that sort of thing. I thought you were a
hard-headed business woman, with all kinds
of remarkable money-making schemes up
your sleeves/ 5

Betty patted the embroidery on her cuff
and frowned disapprovingly at him. " You
shouldn't make fun of the Tally-ho Tea-Shop,
Cousin Joe. It does make money really
and truly it does."

" Well, I guess I know that/' Cousin Joe
assured her solemnly, " and I understand the
extremely marketable nature of ploshkins.
Will keeps me very well posted about his
wonderful sister's wonderful enterprises that
are backed by the Morton millions."

" Don't be silly, please, Cousin Joe," begged
Betty. "I've just done what any girl would
have under the circumstances, and I've had
such very scrumptious luck that's all."

Cousin Joe put on slow speed, and leaned
forward to stare at Betty in the moonlight.
" You've pulled off a start that any man
might envy you, little girl, and you're just as
pretty and young and jolly as if you'd never
touched money except to spend it for clothes



OAT THE CAMPUS 15

and candy. And you still love fun and look
out for fairies, and some day a nice young
man I say, Betty, here's a long straight
stretch. Change seats and see how fast
you can tool her up to the Pine Grove
Country Club for a cool little supper all
around/'

"Oh, could I truly try ?"

Betty's voice sounded like a happy child's,
and her eyes sparkled with pleasure and ex-
citement, as her small hands clutched the big
wheel.

Cousin Joe leaned back and watched her.
" I had a tough pull when I started out in
life," he was thinking, " and no ' such very
scrumptious luck,' either, and I let it sour me.
Betty's game, luck or no luck. Luck's not
the word for it, anyway. Of course people
want to keep friends with the girl who owns
that smile. It means something, her smile
does. It's not in the same class with Miss
Mary Hooper's society smirk. I can't see
myself why that nice young man that I
almost said was going to fall in love with her
some day doesn't come along several of him
in fact. But I'm glad I didn't finish that



16 BETTT WALES

sentence ; I suppose you could spoil even
Betty Wales."

Betty remembered her letter again when
she stepped on it in the dark and it crackled.
She had undressed by moonlight, so as not to
wake little Dorothy, who shared her room at
the cottage. Now she lit a candle, and open-
ing her letter read it in the dim flickering
light. Something dropped out a long slip
that proved, upon further examination, to be
a railroad ticket from Cleveland to Harding
and back again. And the typewritten letter
that might have been " only an old circular '
was signed by no less a personage than the
President of Harding College himself. Seeing
his name at the end, in the queer scraggly
hand that every Harding girl knew, quite
took Betty's breath away, and as for the letter
itself! When she had finished it Betty blew
out the candle and sank down in an awe-
stricken little heap on the floor by the window
to think things over and straighten them out.

Prexy had written to her himself the great
Prexy ! He wanted her to come and advise
with him and Mr. Morton and the architects
about the finishing touches for Morton Hall.



ON THE CAMPUS 17

Of all absurd, unaccountable ideas that was the
queerest.

" Mr. Morton originally suggested asking
you," he wrote, " but I heartily second him.
We both feel sure that the ingenuity of the
young woman who made the Tally-ho Tea-
Shop out of a barn will devise some valuable
features for the new dormitory, thereby fitting
it more completely to the needs of its future
occupants."

Morton Hall was the result of a sugges-
tion Betty had made to her friend Mr. Mor-
ton, the millionaire. It was to give the poorer
girls at Harding an opportunity to live on the
campus and share in the college life.

" Gracious ! ' sighed Betty. " He thinks I
thought up all the tea-room features. It's
Madeline that they want. But Madeline's in
Maine with the Enderbys, and wouldn't come.
And then of course Mr. Morton may need to
be pacified about something. I can do that
part all right. Anyway, I shall have to go,
so long as they have sent a ticket right away
too, or Mr. Morton will be sure to need pacify-
ing most awfully. I wonder what in the
world that postscript means."



i8 BETTY WALES

The postscript said, " I had intended to
write you in regard to another matter, con-
nected not so much with the architecture of
the new hall as with its management ; but
talking it over together will be much more
satisfactory/'

Betty lay awake a long while wondering
about that postscript. When she finally went
to sleep she dreamed that Prexy had hired her
to cook for Morton Hall, and that she scorched
the ice-cream, put salt in the jelly-roll, and
water on the fire. She burned her fingers
doing that and screamed, and it was Will
calling to remind her that he wanted break-
fast and his bag packed in time for the eight-
sixteen.

At the breakfast table the cook she ate
with the family gave notice. She was going
away that very afternoon.

" Most unbusinesslike," Mr. Wales assured
her solemnly, but with a twinkle in his eyes.

" Most absurd," Betty twinkled back at him.
" I can't suggest a thing to those architects,
of course, and they'll just laugh at me, and
Prexy and Mr. Morton will be perfectly dis-
gusted."



ON THE CAMPUS 19

" You've got to make good somehow/' Will
assured her soberly. " It isn't every girl that
gets her expenses paid for a long trip like that,
just to go and advise about things. You're
what they call a consulting expert, Betty.
I'll look up your trains and telephone you
from town. 11

" And I'll help you pack a bag," announced
the Smallest Sister. " You're just going in a
bag, like Will, and coming back for Sunday,
aren't you, Betty dear?'

" Yes, I'm just going in a bag," Betty as-
sured her laughingly, " and coming right back
to Lakeside for Sunday. But perhaps in
September well, we need not think about
September when it's only the middle of
August ; isn't that so, little sister ? '

The Smallest Sister stared solemnly at her.
" We ought to make plans, Betty. Now
Celissa Hooper wants me to be her chum if
I'm going to school in Cleveland this winter,
but if I'm going to be at Miss Dick's again
why of course I can't be chums with Celissa,
'cause I'm chums with Shirley Ware. So I
really ought to know before long who I'm to
be chums with."



20 BETTT WALES

" You certainly ought/' agreed Betty ear-
nestly. " But you'll just have to be very good
friends with Celissa and with Shirley and with
all the other girls until I come back, and then
mother and father and you and I can have a
grand pow-pow over you and me and the tea-
shop and Miss Dick's and everything else
under the sun. Now, who's going to wipe
dishes for me this morning? '

" I am. What's a grand pow-wow ? '

" We'll have one in the kitchen," Betty ex-
plained diplomatically, hurrying off with both
hands full of dishes.

But the pow-wow was a rather spiritless
affair.

" You're thinking of something else, Betty
Wales," declared the Smallest Sister accus-
ingly, right in the midst of the story of the
Reckless Ritherum, who is second cousin to
the Ploshkin and has a very nice tale of its
own. "If you're going to look way off over
my head and think of something else, I guess
I'd rather go up-stairs and make beds all by
my lonesome."

" I'm sorry, dearie," Betty apologized
humbly, " but you see I feel just like a reck-



ON THE CAMPUS 21

less ritherum myself this morning going
out to play with three terrible giants/'

" What giants are you going to play with? *
demanded the Smallest Sister incredulously.

"The fierce giant, the wise giant, and the
head of all the giants," Betty told her. " The
fierce giant eats reckless little ritherums for
his breakfast that's Mr. Morton. The wise
giant laughs at them when they try to show
him how to make the house that Jack built
that's the New York architect. The head of
all the giants that's Prexy shakes the paw
of the poor little Ritherum kindly, and asks
it not to be so silly again as to try to play
with giants, and it gets smaller and smaller
and smaller "

" Just exactly like Alice in Wonderland,"
put in the Smallest Sister excitedly.

" Until it runs home," Betty concluded,
" to play with a little girl named Dorothy
Wales, and then all of a sudden it gets big
and happy and reckless again."

" Then don't be gone long," advised
Dorothy eagerly, " because I'm always in a
hurry to begin playing with you some more."

" Thank you," Betty bowed gravely. " In



22 BETTT WALES

that case I won't let the fierce giant eat me,
nor the wise giant blow me away with his big
laugh, nor the head giant stare at me until I
vanish, recklessness and all, into the Bay of
the Ploshkin."

" I'd fish you up, if you did fall into the
bay," Dorothy assured her, with a sudden hug
that ended fatally for a coffee-cup she was
wiping.

" But it was nicked anyway, so never mind/'
Betty comforted her, " and you've fished me
up lots of times already, so I know you would
again."

" Why, I never " began the Smallest

Sister in amazement.

" All right for you," Betty threatened, put-
ting away her pans with a great clatter. " If
you've stopped believing in fairies and if
you've forgotten how you ever went to the
Bay of the Ploshkin and fished up ritherums
and did other interesting things, why should
I waste my time telling you stories?'

This terrible threat silenced the Smallest
Sister, who therefore never found out how or
when she had " fished up " her sister. But
on the way east Betty, still feeling very like



OAT THE CAMPUS 23

a ritherum, consoled herself by remembering
first her own simile, and then Will's " Maybe
I'm not proud to know you ! ' blurted out as
he had put her on board her train. A little
sister to hug one and a big brother to bestow
foolishly unqualified admiration are just the
very nicest things that a reckless ritherum
can have. And who hasn't felt like a reck-
less ritherum some time or other ?

Mr. Morton was pacing the station plat-
form agitatedly when Betty's train pulled in.

" Twenty-three minutes late, Miss B. A./' he
panted, rushing up to her. He had always
called her that. It stood for Benevolent
Adventurer, and some other things. Grasping
her bag and her arm, he pulled her down the
stairs to his big red touring car. " The way
these railroads are run is abominable a dis-
grace to the country, in my opinion. Now
when I say I'll get to a place at four p. M. I
mean it. And very likely I arrive at six by
train most unbusinesslike. Well, it's not
exactly your fault that idiots run our railroads,
is it, Miss B. A. ? I thought of that without
your telling me give me a long credit mark
for once. Well, I certainly am glad to see



24 BETTT WALES

you, and to find you looking so brown and
jolly. No bothers and worries these days,
Miss B. A. ? "

" Except the responsibility of having to
think up enough good suggestions for Morton
Hall to pay you for asking me to come and
for taking the time to be here to meet me,"
Betty told him laughingly.

Mr. Morton snorted his indignation. " That
responsibility may worry you, but it doesn't
me not one particle. Now, by the way, don't
be upset by any idiotic remarks of the young
architect chap that has this job in charge.
Whatever a person wants, he says you can't
have it that seems to be his idea of doing
business. Then after you've shown him that
your idea of doing business is to do it or know
the reason wh}% he sits down and figures the
thing out in great shape. He's a very smart
young fellow, but he hates to give in. I
presume that's why Parsons and Cope put
him on this job they've done work for me
before, and they know that I have ideas of my
own and won't be argued out of them except
by a fellow who can convince me he really
knows more about the job than I do. Just the



OAT THE CAMPUS 25

same, don't you pay much attention to his
obstruction game. Remember that you're
here because I want this dormitory to be the
way you want it."

Betty promised just as the car drew up in
front of the Tally-ho. " Thought you'd like
a cup of your own tea/' explained Mr. Morton,
" and a sight of your new electric fixtures,
and so forth. Miss Davis is expecting you.
Let's see." He consulted his watch, compar-
ing it carefully with Betty's and with the
clock in the automobile, which aroused his
intense irritation by being two minutes
slow. " It's now three forty-one. I'll be
back in nineteen minutes. If I can find that
architect chap, I'll bring him along. He
knows all the main features of the building
better than I do, and he's a pretty glib talker,
so I guess we'll let him take you over the
place the first time."

Exactly nineteen minutes later, just as
Betty and Emily Davis had " begun to get
ready to start to commence," according to
Emily's favorite formula, the inspection of
the tea-shop and the exchange of summer
experiences, the big red car came snorting



26 BETTT WALES

back and stopped with a jerk to let out a tall
young man, who ran across the lawn and in
at the Tally-ho's hospitably opened door.

" Mr. Morton wishes to know if Miss

Wales " he began. Then he rushed up

to Betty. " By all that's amazing, the great
Miss Wales is the one I used to know I How
are you, Betty ? '

" Why, Jim Watson, where did you come
from? " demanded Betty in amazement.

Jim's eyes twinkled. " From the Morton
Mercedes most recently, and until I get back
to it with you I'm afraid we'd better defer
further explanations."

Betty nodded. " Only you must just meet
Emily Davis Miss Davis, Mr. Watson. She's
a friend of Eleanor's too. And you must tell
me one thing. Is the architect out there with
Mr. Morton ? "

" No," said Jim solemnly, " he isn't, natu-
rally, since he's in here with you. Architect
Watson, with Parsons and Cope, at your serv-
ice, Miss Wales."

" Are you the real one the one in charge ? "
persisted Betty. " You aren't the one that
won't let Mr. Morton have his own way ? "



ON THE CAMPUS 27

" I am that very one," Jim assured her
briskly, " but there are some lengths to which
I don't go. So please come along to the car
in a hurry, or I shall certainly be sent back to
New York forthwith."

" Gracious ! That would be perfectly dread-
ful ! Good-bye, Emily." Betty sped down
the path at top speed, Jim after her.

" Did you stop to introduce yourself in
detail, Watson ? " inquired Mr. Morton irri-
tably, opening the door of the tonneau.

" He didn't have to introduce himself,"
Betty put in breathlessly, " but I made him
stop to explain himself, and now I certainly
shan't worry about his objections and opinions,
because I've known him for ages. Why, he's
Eleanor Watson's brother Jim. You've heard
Babe and me talk about Eleanor."

" I should say that I have," cried Mr.
Morton jubilantly. " So you can manage her
brother as nicely as you manage me, can you,
Miss B. A. ? I knew you ought to come up
and see to things. Hurry along a little,
Jonas, can't you? We're not out riding for
our health to-day. There are some little
things I haven't just liked, and now that I've



28 BETTT WALES

got Miss B. A. to help me manage you
Feeling scared, Watson ? '

" Not a bit, sir, thank you," said Jim with
his sunniest smile. " But I'm certainly feeling
glad to see Miss Betty again."

" What's that? Glad to see Miss B. A.?
Well, I should certainly hope so/' snapped
Jasper J. Morton. " I'd have a good deal less
use for you, sir, than I've had so far, if you
weren't.' 1



CHAPTER II

ARCHITECT'S PLANS AND OTHERS

STOPPING at Prexy's house to get him to
join the grand tour brought back Betty's
" ritherum ' feeling very hard indeed. Jim
was so dignified and businesslike when he
talked to Prexy and Mr. Morton ; they were
both so dignified and intent on their plans for
Morton Hall. And evidently they all seri-
ously expected Betty to do something about
it. Betty set her lips, twisted her handker-
chief into a hard little knot, and walked up
to the door, resolved to do the something ex-
pected of her or die in the attempt.

Jim, who was ahead, had the door open for
the others when Mr. Morton commanded a
halt.


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Online LibraryEdith K. (Edith Kellogg) DuntonBetty Wales on the campus → online text (page 1 of 15)